Interviews


"Personal Touch"
By Owen Mortimer - International Piano, UK; January / February 2019
German Pianist Burkard Schliessmann explains how he found inspiration for his latest album of Schumann by delving deep into Romantic literature and philosophy, as well as encountering the underwater world through his love of scuba

International Piano




International Piano magazine is essential reading for the piano enthusiats. Each issue brings you interviews with the world's leading pianists and rising talent in the sector as well as commentary on the piano greats of the pasts.



"Renaissance man"
By Andrew Anderson - Performaning Arts Yearbook, UK,  2018 / 19
Unlike many musicians, pianist BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN is devoted to a number of interests away from his instrument. He tells PAY how these impact his playing in a postivie way

International Piano






"Chopin by the Numbers? A perspective by Burkard Schliessmannn"
By Jerry Dubins - Fanfare Magazin, USA; Volume 39 No. 2, March / April 2016

When last I interviewed pianist Burkard Schliessmann in 38:4, the subject was Bach and Burkard’s new Divine Art SACD containing a handful of Bach’s well-known keyboard works. Since then, Burkard has been very busy. Touching base with him exactly one year later, I learn that he has just completed an even more ambitious project for Divine Art, a three-disc SACD set containing a representative cross-section of works by Chopin.

Included in Burkard’s new release are the 24 Preludes, op. 28, and a generous helping of the composer’s Scherzos, Ballades, and pieces in other genres that Chopin cultivated and made famous. Apart from the magnificent playing that distinguishes Burkard’s new three-disc set, what makes it different—the angle, if you will—is his decision to present his program in chronological order, or, by the numbers.

Other artists, of course, have done likewise in recitals of works by other composers, but such an approach takes on special significance with respect to Chopin. Burkard makes this clear in his extraordinarily extensive and detailed album note, in which he quotes Alexander Scriabin as once having remarked that “Chopin had shown little or no sign of further development during the course of his creative life.” It’s not just that Chopin composed almost exclusively for the piano; it’s that once he had perfected a formal typology—say a nocturne, a mazurka, or a polonaise—so the criticism goes, the template was set and he evidenced little desire to expand upon or explore it further, other than of course to replenish it again and again with gorgeous music.
Burkard is of the strong opinion that this was not the case—that Chopin has received a bum rap on this particular account—and he sets out to prove his point by programming the works on these three discs chronologically.

Burkard, the first thing I would note is that the opus numbers of Chopin’s works, unlike those of a number of other prominent composers, do align closely with the chronology of their composition. But there are some overlaps where Chopin worked on a particular piece, such as the Ballade No. 2 in F Major, op. 38, over a lengthy stretch of time—from 1836 to 1839, meanwhile completing other pieces with higher opus numbers first. And then, too, there are almost as many works without opus numbers, published both in the composer’s lifetime and posthumously, that bear composition dates proximate to the works with opus numbers. How do you sort this all out?

I don’t, or better didn’t, sort it out. Of course, I’m aware of all these circumstances. For example, the Ballade No. 2 in F Major you mention was originally planned with a completely different conclusion. Robert Schumann, to whom this work was dedicated, remembered quite well that Chopin played this piece with an end in F Major. And with many other pieces, too, we know from the manuscripts that Chopin continued to work and make changes here and there, even in the ornamentation; and he didn’t rest until he had a solution that satisfied him.

We know that unlike Liszt, who needed a large concert hall in which to demonstrate his brilliant abilities, Chopin preferred to play in intimate surroundings before “company,” rather than an “audience,” and that he regarded the sound world of his music as being realized more perfectly in a salon than on a concert platform. It need hardly be said that this does not label him as a salon composer in the derogatory sense. The word “salon” refers to the aristocratic qualities that distinguish Chopin and his interpreters: their culture, their sensibilities, and their nobility of taste. These qualities rule out “effect” for its own sake, however dazzling, but they do not exclude (as a misunderstanding of the word “salon” might suggest) deep feelings, fire, strength, and passion.

One already can see this in his mazurkas, those miniatures which kept him busy all his life. In these little jewels—small only as regards their dimensions—one can see how Chopin worked and how he is to be understood: as an incomparable master of contrasting characteristics within an unchanging form, a Romantic lyricist who inherited elegance from the French and a fiery temperament from his Polish ancestors. And what immense variety there is in this music! Contemplation abruptly gives way to a compulsive desire to dance, swiftly followed in turn by a re-creation of the opening mood, as in the Mazurka in G Major, op. 67/2. Or, take the Mazurka in C Major, op. 56/2: A powerful chordal, almost rustic, dance suddenly loses itself in a delicate ornamental texture of quaver figuration within broad legato phrases.

In the posthumously published four Mazurkas of op. 68, two contrasting dance melodies are brought together: the charming youthful piece (No. 2) in which the almost coquettishly elegiac A-Minor section gives way to an elegant pocopiùmosso A-Major section (though this, too, is of short duration), and Chopin’s last composition, dictated on his deathbed, that profoundly poignant F-Minor Mazurka (No. 4), in which the dance rhythm survives only as a faint recollection beyond a veil of mist. The extended middle part is available only in a very few editions. All of this occurs within a sphere of melodic invention full of flexibility and charm, which belongs psychologically among the criteria governing our use of the word “dancelike,” and which in the case of Chopin’s mazurkas is perhaps more captivating than their origins in Polish folklore. In a harmonic context, which has been described aptly as “pre-Tristan chromaticism,” and which prepared the way for Debussy’s innovations in the field of harmonic coloration, Chopin has worked very long on these details to achieve his unique musical profile.

When we look at his manuscripts, we see that Chopin worked very hard on his ideas and had something special in mind. Very often he wrote something down, then rejected it and made many corrections, coming up with a completely different version, or, curiously, sometimes coming back to first version. We also know that he started work on the Preludes, op. 28, much earlier, but finished them in Mallorca in the winter of 1838–39. Having arrived in Mallorca, Chopin wrote from Valldemosa on December 28, 1838 to his friend Julian Fontana:

“Between cliff and sea, in a great, abandoned Carthusian abbey, you can imagine me in a cell whose doors are bigger than the house gates in Paris, unkempt, without white gloves and pale as ever. The cell is like a coffin with a high dusty vaulted roof. A small window, before which grow orange trees, palms, cypresses. Opposite the window, beneath a filigree rosette in Moorish style, stands my camp bed. Beside it an old empty writing-desk, which can scarcely be used, upon it a leaden candlestick (there is such luxury here!) with a little candle, Bach’s works, the folder with my own scribble and writing materials that do not belong to me. A stillness—one could scream—it is always silent. In a word, I write to you from a strange place.”

In support of your primary argument that Chopin did develop and evolve, can you point to some of the salient differences between pieces that are not necessarily adjacent to each other because they are of a different form—such as the Barcarolle in F sharp Major, op. 60, and the Polonaise-Fantaisie in A flat Major, op. 61—but between two pieces of the same type, one being later than the other—such as the Scherzo No. 2 in B flat Minor, op. 31, and the Scherzo in C sharp Minor, op. 39?

The Berceuse, the Barcarolle, and especially the Polonaise-Fantaisie (which is Chopin’s last major work in length and form) really show enormous development from his early works. The Berceuse in D flat Major, op. 57, is acknowledged as a classic example of unparalleled delicacy of sound. It is wonderful to see the inspired invention with which an ostinato bass figure, comparable to a chaconne, is overlaid with broken chords, fioritura, arabesques, trills, and cascading passages formed and developed as variations, which emerge at first from a dreamlike peace in ever faster coloratura and brilliant iridescence to a virtuosic middle section, only to sink back into that visionary peace when the quaver rhythm blends with the rocking left-hand figure.

The Barcarolle, op. 60, is a creation of sublime beauty. In its range of expression, its rainbow of colors, its rocking rhythm, and its perfectly judged formal design, it’s one of Chopin’s masterpieces. Carl Tausig wrote of the Barcarolle:

“This is a study of two persons, a love scene in a secret gondola; let us say this dramatization is the very symbol of lovers meeting. This is expressed in the thirds and sixths; the dualism of two notes (persons) is constant; all is for two parts or two souls. In this modulation in C sharp Major (dolce sfogato), there is surely kiss and embrace! That much is clear!—when after three opening bars the fourth introduces this gently swaying theme as a bass solo, and yet this theme is used only as accompaniment throughout the whole fabric upon which the cantilena in two parts comes to rest, we are dealing with a sustained, tender dialogue.”

Interesting: The dolce sfogato in bar 78 appears for the first time in the history of composition. Really sensational!

The Polonaise-Fantaisie, op. 61, is Chopin’s last great work for piano. It cannot in fact be considered a true polonaise. It is far more of a fantasia, whose unusual form corresponds to that of a symphonic poem or a large-scale symphonic work. Its musical program is more that of a ballade than that of a dance. It is legitimate to ask whether this late work of Chopin deserves to have its sustained air of inner reflection disturbed by coquettish fancies. The underlying maestoso character (with the tempo heading Allegro-Maestoso) governs the mood of the whole work and calls for something that will “bear the load, maintain equilibrium, yet remain weightless.” It is a key composition among Chopin’s last works, which are characterized by feverish unrest and offer no daring images or sunny landscapes. Franz Liszt’s poetic depiction sounds strange to us today, particularly in connection with his own works:

“These are pictures that are unfavorable to art, like the depiction of all extreme moments, of agony, where the muscles lose all their tension and the nerves, no longer tools of the will, become the passive prey of human pain. A sorrowful prospect indeed, which the artist should accept into his domain only with the utmost care.”

These are moving words indeed, but I believe that Liszt came into conflict with the formal layout of this work, possibly in much the same way in which Eduard Hanslick bluntly dismissed Franz Liszt’s own B-Minor Sonata as “the fruitlessly spinning wheels of a genius driven by steam.” This presents the performing artists with the challenge of shaping this work so as to do justice to its content: compelling, balanced organic structure throughout, with a view of its greatness, despite the risk of losing oneself in the limited execution of its wonderfully thrilling details.

How did you come to choose the specific pieces for your Chopin collection that you did? And more to the point, what do you find in these particular pieces that supports your argument about the composer’s development?

The pieces I selected have, for many years, been part of my life and of my engagement with Chopin. I played them (and still do!) in various recitals and know how the audience reacts. Lastly, I would say, that these pieces are parts of myself. I wanted to put the smaller pieces next to the major ones. For example, I see the Preludes, op. 28, not as a collection of miniatures, but as a big, coherent major cycle, like Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier. Chopin’s cycle is composed of 24 pieces that encompass all 12 major and minor keys; his Preludes, however, are not in chromatic progression but follow the principle of the circle of fifths.

My next recording plans include the three sonatas. With them I will show that Chopin not only was a great admirer of the classical form but that he was able to manage large-scale sonata-allegro form with all its classical rules and demands.

In all honesty, Burkard, I have to tell you that I’m not as big a fan of Chopin as I know many readers of this magazine are. I’ve admitted in the past that there’s something about Chopin’s music I find depressing. It’s not that there’s a feeling of sadness to much of it; a lot of music makes us shed a tear or two. But feeling sad and depressed, for me at least, are two different things. What much of Chopin’s music communicates to me is a sort of despondency or forlornness, as if it’s completely bereft of hope. I know there are upbeat pieces among his output, and certainly a lot of thunderous, virtuoso fireworks in many works, but my overall takeaway impression of the music is of an abiding pall, and not of a kind I personally respond to. What would you say to someone like me that might help me to hear Chopin in a different way?

Your attitude and reservations are a good place to start. So, let’s go back to Alexander Scriabin. He once expressed the view that Chopin had shown little or no sign of further development during the course of his creative life. His concentration on the piano was often attacked and misinterpreted as “one-sided” or “unimaginative”; though Scriabin himself in his first decade had been an epigone of the music of Chopin, especially in Scriabin’s first compositions, such as the Preludes, op. 11, and the Sonata No. 3 in F sharp Minor, op. 23, which is his last sonata using traditional form and which represents the climax of a movement discernible in his earlier works. Comments about Scriabin, written by Boris Pasternak, who took a paternal interest in the composer, may assist us to a greater understanding of him in comparison and opposition to Chopin:

“It was the first settlement of mankind in worlds which Wagner had discovered for mythical creatures and monsters. Drumrolls and chromatic waterfalls of trumpets, which sounded as cold as the jet from a firehouse, frightened them away…[A] Van Gogh sun glowed over the fence of the symphony. On its windowsills lay the dusty archives of Chopin….I could not but weep when I heard this music.”

So far, we already can see the deep chasm between the philosophy and aesthetics of both composers. This is reason enough to take a fresh look at the art of Frédéric Chopin. Alexander Scriabin’s inner and outer creative path was that of a confirmed cosmopolitan. A variety of creative and maturational processes shaped his artistic activities as composer, pianist, and philosopher, starting as an inheritor of the Chopin tradition and concluding as a forerunner of early atonality and serial music, with his last sonatas and preludes powerfully shaping and influencing the landscape of this creative sphere. The accord mystique created by him on the basis of the tritone served as an electrifying pole, and thus, the breeding-ground for his compositional subtleties, drawing the energy fields of his major symphonic works and his late sonatas into the center of his own dodecaphonic thinking. So, this very chord acted as the focus of the serial idea itself and reverberated throughout the entire compositional world. This may make Frédéric Chopin, who always led a secluded life and gave very few insights into his artistic and private life, seem a pallid character by comparison.

However, it would be a mistake to compare Chopin’s agenda as a composer to that of Alexander Scriabin, let alone equate the two. Let us remind ourselves that Robert Schumann dedicated his Kreisleriana to Chopin, who thought little of the work on account of its deliberate disjointedness, confusion, complexity, and exaltation. Chopin’s own sense and awareness of Classical form made him a stranger to the world of phantasmagoria.

Although often at the heart of society life in Paris, Chopin saw the profligate glamour of its banquets more as a necessary evil than as an inner need. At his beloved Nohant, he often fled the ever-present social scene and concentrated his attention on exchanges with close friends in the artistic community, such as Delacroix. His reticence is evident not only in his own personality but in his compositional thinking, which shows that he shunned influences from outside the musical sphere. The Romantic interweaving of music and literature that was characteristic of Schumann and Liszt was a negligible source of inspiration for him; Chopin’s music, the expression and mirror of his innermost being, was and remained autonomous, free from all extraneous impulses and thus independent of outward circumstances.

In a relatively short creative life of 20 years or so, Chopin redrew the boundaries of Romantic music, and his self-imposed restriction to the 88 keys of the piano keyboard sublimated nothing less than the aesthetic essence of piano music. It was his total identification with the instrument which, in its radical regeneration of the lyric and the dramatic, phantasy and passion, and their unique fusion, shaped a tonal language which united an aristocratic sense of style and formal Classical training and intuition with an ascetic rigor. Chopin’s precisely marshaled trains of thought permitted no experiments, and so he did not “wander about” within stylistic points of reference as Scriabin was to do.

Today, more than 150 years after his death, Frédéric Chopin’s eminence as a composer remains undisputed. There must now be general agreement that he was not a writer of salon compositions but a truly great composer. Like Mozart, Schubert, and Verdi, Chopin was a gifted tunesmith. There can few if any musicians who have created melodies of such subtlety and nobility. His Ballades, Scherzos, Études, Polonaises, the 24 Preludes, the B flat Minor and B-Minor Sonatas, the latter with a final movement—as Joachim Kaiser once formulated it—in which “a mortally ill genius composed a glorious, wonderfully overheated anthem to the life force,” have never disappeared from the concert hall repertoire or the record catalogs.

Chopin’s biography, on the other hand, remains obscure. A man who “withheld” himself all his life in contrast to the openness and accessibility of his contemporary Franz Liszt, he always conveyed the impression of a suffering soul, not to say a martyr, almost as if this was to nourish or even underpin his inspiration. It is no wonder that popular literature dubbed him a “tuberculous man of sorrows” and “a consumptive salon Romantic.” Striving for crystalline perfection, he never ventured outside his own domain. The refusal to compromise what was innate to his character finally compelled him to break off his long-lasting liaison with George Sand and her daughter Solange. He was a loner and undoubtedly an elitist, but at the same time a sufferer. This is made clearer by a comparison with the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, who is said as a child to have given “martyr” as his chosen career. Chopin too must have shared this cult of the pater dolorosus.

Although a European celebrity, he was surrounded even then by an aura of mystery. Even as a practicing pianist, he was a special case. His playing is described by all his contemporaries as something exceptionally individual. Rarely, indeed, did he appear on the concert platform, feverishly awaited by his followers, “for the man they were waiting for was not only a skilled virtuoso, a pianist versed in the art of the keyboard; he was not only an artist of high reputation, he was all that and more yet than that; he was Chopin,” as Franz Liszt wrote in 1841 in his review of a Chopin concert. Liszt gave his own view of Chopin’s reclusiveness: “What would have marked a certain retreat into oblivion and obscurity for anybody else gave him a reputation immune from all the whims of fashion. This precious, truly high and supremely noble fame was proof against all attacks.”

The reason for his reclusiveness and for the rarity of his appearances on the concert platform is given by Chopin himself in his observation to Liszt, whose virtuosity Chopin always admired: “I am not suited to giving concerts; the audience scares me, its breath stifles me, its inquisitive looks cripple me, I fall silent before strange faces. But you are called to this; for if you do not win over your audience, you are still capable of subjugating it.”
Ignaz Moscheles, himself one of the leading pianists of the 19th century, gave what is perhaps the most expressive and beautiful commentary on Chopin’s pianistic status and ability when he wrote in 1839:

“His [Chopin’s] appearance is altogether identified with his music; both are tender and ardent. He played to me at my request, and only now do I understand his music, can I explain to myself the ardent devotion of the ladies. His ad libitum playing, which degenerates into a loss of bar structure among the interpreters of his music, is in his hands only the most delightful originality of performance; the dilettantish hard modulations, which I cannot rise above when I play his pieces, no longer shock me, because he trips through them so delicately with his elfin touch; his piano is so softly whispered that he needs no powerful forte to express the desired contrasts; accordingly one does not miss the orchestra-like effects which the German school demands of a pianoforte player, but is carried away, as if by a singer who yields to his feelings with little concern for his accompaniment; in a word, he is unique in the world of pianoforte players.”

There has been much discussion about the manner of his rubato playing, with his contemporaries greatly differing in their views.

“His playing was always noble and fine, his gentlest tones always sang, whether at full strength or in the softest piano. He took infinite pains to teach the pupil this smooth, songful playing. ‘Il (elle) ne sait pas lierdeux notes’ [He (she) does not know how to join two notes], that was his severest criticism. He also required that his pupils should maintain the strictest rhythm, hated all stretching and tugging, inappropriate rubato and exaggerated ritardando. ‘Je vousprie de vousasseoir’ [Please be seated], he would say on such occasions with gentle mockery.”

This recollection of a female pupil polarized whole generations of piano professors in their search for the meaning of “rubato,” particularly in view of other, more weighty opinions, such as those of Berlioz, who saw Chopin’s playing as marred by exaggerated license and excessive willfulness: “Chopin submitted only reluctantly to the yoke of bar lines; in my opinion, he took rhythmical independence much too far….Chopin could not play at a steady pace.” Evidently he did not allow his pupils the license he reserved for himself.

Franz Liszt, in his 1851 biography of Chopin, explained:

“Even if these pages do not suffice to speak of Chopin as we should wish, we hope that the magic which his name justly exercises will add all that our words lack. Chopin was extinguished by slowly perishing in his own flame. His life, lived far from all public events, was as it were a bodiless being that reveals itself only in the traces he has left us in his musical works. He breathed his last in a foreign country that never became a new home for him; he stayed true to his eternally orphaned fatherland. He was a poet with a soul filled with secrets and plagued by sorrows.”

Also interesting is that Liszt himself preferred the rich-toned and brilliant Érard as an instrument, while Chopin looked for the much more sensitive and fragile Pleyel, where he had a wide range of colors and also could emphasize darker sonorities. In conclusion, Chopin nothing has to do with a “thunderer”; it’s the art of a quiet and silent genius, delicate and fragile.

And, last but not least, Chopin was a great admirer of Johann Sebastian Bach and was inspired by his work. Chopin took The Well-Tempered Clavier, in the new Paris edition, to Mallorca with him and applied himself to a special study of Bach’s masterpiece. His love of Bach links him with Felix Mendelssohn, and also with Ferdinand Hiller. Together with Hiller and Liszt, Chopin had performed Bach’s Concerto for Three Pianos. Bach epitomized for Chopin greatness and order and peace. Bach also signified refuge in past times. It was that for which he yearned at all times and in all places.

Chopin had been drawn to Bach’s works in his early years by his Warsaw teacher Wojciech Żywny, not at all in accordance with the tastes of his day. Chopin made his own pupils study Bach’s preludes and fugues in great detail, and during the two weeks of the year in which he prepared himself for a major concert, he played nothing but Bach. In his Études, Chopin showed how well he had mastered the laws of logic and structure that he admired in Bach. In composing his 24 Preludes, Chopin once again revealed his debt to Bach. True, none of his preludes is followed by a fugue, but each piece is self-contained and makes its own statement.

In the Revue et Gazette musicale of May 2, 1841, Franz Liszt had this to say of Chopin’s recital of April 26 that year:

“The Préludes of Chopin are compositions of quite exceptional status. They are more than pieces, as the title might suggest, that are intended to introduce other pieces; they are poetic preludes comparable to those of a great contemporary poet [possibly Lamartine], which cradle the soul in golden dreams and lift it into ideal realms. Admirable in their variety, they reveal the work and the skill that went into them only upon careful examination. All seems here a first cast of the die, full of élan and sudden inspiration. They have the free and full spirit that characterizes the works of a genius.”

Robert Schumann, on the other hand, was bewildered by the Preludes: “They are sketches, the beginnings of studies, or if you will, ruins, single eagle’s wings, motley and jumbled. There is sick, feverish, odious stuff in the volume; let each seek what he desires.”

Maybe Schumann recognized traits of his own here. In any case, he had already been subjected to criticism of this kind. In a review of 1839, the music critic Ludwig Rellstab finds fault with Schumann’s Kinderszenen for “feverish dreams” and “oddities.” Schumann saw in Bach the origin of all combinatorics in music; for Chopin, however, Bach meant size, order, and tranquility, but also security in the past.

Chopin himself was quite cross when George Sand talked of “imitative sound-painting,” and protested vehemently against theatrical interpretations. “He was right,” admitted Sand later. He was furious, too, when she translated his D♭-Prelude into mystical experiences and spheres: “The Prelude he composed that evening was surely full of the raindrops that danced on the echoing tiles of the abbey; in his imagination, though, and in his song, these drops were transformed into tears that fell from heaven into his heart.” In fact, Chopin composed on Mallorca as he always did, nobly, majestically, elegiacally.

George Sand’s daughter Solange expressed and elaborated on this in 1859:

“Chopin! Elect soul, entrancing spirit, ready to joke in the hours in which bodily pains allowed him a little respite. Born a superior being, exquisite manners. Sublime and melancholic genius! Purest decency and honor, finest tenderness. The modesty of good taste, unselfishness, generosity, unchangeable devotion. An angelic soul, tossed down to earth in a tormented body, to complete a mysterious redemption here. Is his life of thirty-nine years of agony the reason that his music is so exalted, so graceful, so select?”

My goodness, Burkard, that was surely way more of an answer to my question than I bargained for. It’s very interesting, though, because so many of the writings about Chopin you quote, and so much of how he seems to have been seen by his contemporaries, tends to reinforce our image of him as a sort of delicate, fragile, epicene of a boy-man that has come down to us in popular lore. Personally, I don’t buy it. He may have been sickly, yes, but his music is not sentimental salon music. Much in Chopin speaks with pride, strength, and resolve. I do want to ask you one last question, though, since you touched on it in your answer above, and that has to do with Chopin’s pianos. The composer is quoted as saying, “When I am not in the mood, I play on the Érard piano, where I find the ready tone easily. But when I am full of vigor and strong enough to find my very own tone, I need a Pleyel piano.” One might wonder what Chopin was not in the mood for when he preferred an Érard, but my question to you, Burkard, is how you would feel about playing Chopin on an actual Érard or Pleyel, as opposed to a modern concert grand. It has been done. If those were the instruments Chopin knew and was writing for, how might their tone, timbre, and mechanisms alter our impression of his music?

When Chopin played on a Pleyel, it was a big challenge to his technique and his sensitivity to sound and colors. A Pleyel was a much more sensible and sensitive instrument than an Érard. In the case of a Pleyel, Chopin was challenged to shape each single tone. This is what he meant when he said, “When I am full of vigor and strong enough to find my very own tone, I need a Pleyel piano.”

I regret that the Érards, which Liszt preferred, or the Pleyels that Chopin played are not built any more today. The modern ones don’t have anything to do with the historic ones, and Pleyel, to my regret, no longer exists today. So, we only can remember on a few remaining historic instruments, what their tone, timbre, and mechanism were like. As you know, I’m no fan of old and historic instruments. Also in the case of Bach, I prefer new and technically perfect instruments (I spoke in earlier interviews in Fanfare 31:3, 38:4, and 31:3 about this).

I very much respect those artists that specialize on playing historic instruments, but I personally feel at home on new instruments, which are perfect in mechanism, tone, and timbre, and which allow me an unlimited range of colors. I’m convinced this allows me to be much closer to the intention, as well as the perfectionism Chopin wanted.

One of the biggest changes since the 1960 Chopin celebrations has been the growth of the period performance movement. I personally remain committed to a modern instrument. Why?

We know that Chopin preferred the sound of Pleyel, which was much clearer, more intimate, and nearly chamber-music-like than the Érard Liszt used, which was richer-toned and orchestral. I personally never even wanted (how crazy and terrible to say it!) to play on an old or historical piano, because the technique itself wouldn’t be sufficient for my demands.

For this edition, I used a special Steinway, an instrument I sought for many years. It has an extreme clarity and sonority, extreme colorfulness, and an unlimited range of registrations over the entire keyboard. It’s an exceptional instrument that is ideal for music of Classical style. Georges Ammann, world famous technician of Steinway, again did a great job and has been on my side the whole time. He has exclusively been looking after my instruments for years. For this music, you absolutely need a special tone, a special sound. And something else special the instrument must have; it’s the phenomenon of Jeu perlé! The instrument I’m using reacts here in perfect manner, and when you hear, for example, the closing figures of the Barcarolle or the Fantaisie, you will know what I mean and how it should be!

The studio of Teldex in Berlin is a hall with phenomenal acoustics and very special warmth of sound. That’s where I also recorded my Goldbergs (Bayer BR 100 326). Again I used one of my own Steinways, and again worked with my Teldex team, FriedemannEngelbrecht, Tobias Lehmann, and Julian Schwenkner as recording producers, and Julian Schwenkner and Wolfgang Schiefermair as my recording engineers. To bring out such a result requires the combination and synergy of all powers. If only one link is missing from the chain, the complete project is “out.”

To conclude: The things that are most important to me in such a project are perfectionism and truth—truth of interpretation, truth of sound, truth of the instrument, truth of the hall, truth, lastly, of all. This means “Artistic Integrity” to me. Coming back to my artistic aims in my new Chopin, it’s a special combination of lyricism, poetry, virtuosity, noblesse (!), and Classical strength, but also of Romantic enthusiasm and passion in bringing out this “obscure man,” Chopin, to create an experience never before heard.

Let’s close with Schumann’s famous description of Chopin: “Chopin’s works are cannons camouflaged by flowers. In this, his origin, in the fate of his nation, rests the explanation of his advantages and of his faults alike. If the talk is of enthusiasm, grace, freedom of expression, of awareness, fire and nobility, who would not think of him, but then again, who would not, when there is talk of foolishness, morbid eccentricity, even hatred and fury!”

This has been my ideal since earliest childhood. One cannot describe Chopin better. Here you find the “explosion,” which is hidden under a surface, which means something completely different than superficial thunder.

Go to Top



Interview Burkard Schliessmann (December 2015)
By Oliver Fraenzke -
The New Listener - Das Hörerlebnis unter der Lupe ... December 31, 2015
I
Am 8. Januar 2016 erscheint die neueste CD-Einspielung des deutsch-amerikanischen Konzertpianisten Burkard Schliessmann, „Chronological Chopin“. Auf drei CDs spielt Schliessmann für Divine Art viele der Höhenpunkte aus dem Schaffen des polnischen Komponisten vom ersten Scherzo Op. 20 chronologisch aufwärts bis zur Polonaise-Fantasie Op. 61, inbegriffen alle Balladen und Scherzi, die 24 Préludes sowie einige Einzelwerke.
Bereits im Vorfeld der Veröffentlichung durfte ich für „The New Listener“ das neue Tripelalbum hören und den Pianisten zu Chopin, zu seiner Art der Darbietung, zur Programmauswahl sowie natürlich auch über sich und sein Künstlertum interviewen.
 


BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN

 

In Ihren bisherigen Einspielungen widmeten Sie sich bereits einigen sehr zentralen Komponisten rund um Chopin, sowie Johann Sebastian Bach, der durchaus gewichtigen Einfluss auf die Musik Chopins hatte, oder Alexander Scriabin, welcher sich in seinem Frühwerk hauptsächlich den polnischen Komponisten als Idol erwählt hatte. Doch auch mit Musik Frédéric Chopins erschien bereits unter anderem 2003 eine CD von Ihnen. Nun folgt ein wahres Mammutprogramm, wo Sie auf gleich drei CDs etliche seiner Hauptwerke wie die Balladen, die Scherzi, die Préludes und weiteres veröffentlichen, teils zum wiederholten Male. Aber warum Chopin? In Ihrem Booklettext nannten Sie ihn als Ihren „Lieblingskomponisten“. Was macht ihn zu diesem und was ist so einzigartig an seiner Musik, dass Sie ausgerechnet ihn auserwählten für dieses große Projekt?

[Burkard Schliessmann:]

Chopin kann man nur verstehen und begreifen, wenn man verinnerlicht hat, dass er und seine Musik ein „ganzes Leben“ sind. So ist es eine Frage der Ästhetik, auf welch unverwechselbare Art und Weise seine Musik eine einzigartige Balance zwischen ‚Bedeutung des Moments und Forderung der Sache sind’. Hier geht es nicht um bloße ‚schöne Gefühlsduselei’, sondern um ‚kontrollierte Emotionalität’, basierend auf einem tiefen Verständnis der ‚klassischen Formen’ und deren inneren Strukturen.

In einer relativ kurzen Schaffenszeit von etwa 20 Jahren hat er die Grenzen der romantischen Musik neu definiert, wie er auch in der Beschränkung auf das Medium der 88 Tasten eine ästhetische Konzentration der Klaviermusik schlechthin sublimierte. Es war die völlige Identifizierung mit dem Instrument, welche in der radikalen Hervorbringung von Lyrik und Dramatik, Phantasie und Leidenschaft und deren einzigartiger Verschmelzung eine Tonsprache von aristokratischem Stilempfinden, formaler, klassischer Schulung und Formempfinden sowie Strenge vereinte. Chopins punktgenaues Denken erlaubte keine Experimente, weswegen er bezüglich seines stilistischen Denkens auch nicht »umherirrte«, wie Scriabin es getan hat.

Vergegenwärtigen wir uns: Alexander Scriabin äußerte einmal, dass Chopin sich in seiner gesamten Schaffenszeit so gut wie überhaupt nicht weiterentwickelt habe. Oft wurde ihm auch vielerseits die Konzentration auf das Klavier als »Einseitigkeit«, bisweilen »Einfallslosigkeit«, angeheftet und fehlgedeutet.

Alexander Scriabins innerer und äußerer Schaffensweg war der eines ausgesprochenen Kosmopoliten. Mehrere Schaffens- und Reifungsprozesse prägten sein künstlerisches Wirken als Komponist, Pianist, aber auch als Philosoph, ausgehend von einer – fast möchte man sagen – epigonalen Nachfolge der Werke Chopins bis hin zur Vorwegnahme der frühen Atonalität und seriellen Epoche, wofür seine letzten Sonaten und Préludes als Pionierleistungen die Landschaft dieses kompositorischen Denkens nachhaltig prägten und beeinflussten. So wie der von ihm auf Basis des Tritonus geschaffene »accordmystique« die Energiefelder seiner symphonischen Großwerke, aber auch der späten Sonaten als elektrisierendes Zentrum – und somit als Grundlage zur Abspaltung kompositorischer Raffinessen dienend – in den Mittelpunkt seines eigenen dodekaphonischen Denkens rückte, so wurde dieser Akkord zum Focus der tatsächlichen seriellen Idee und revoltierte somit in der gesamten kompositorischen Welt. Unter diesem Blickwinkel vermag Frédéric Chopin, der stets zurückgezogen lebte und kaum Einblicke in sein Künstler- und Privatleben gewährte, (scheinbar) zu verblassen.

Frédéric Chopins Rang als Komponist ist heute, mehr als 150 Jahre nach seinem Tod, unbestritten. Man dürfte sich auch endlich darüber einig geworden sein, dass er kein Salonkomponist, sondern ein wirklich »großer« Komponist war.

Ähnlich wie Mozart, Schubert und Verdi gehört Chopin zu den begnadeten Melodikern. Kaum ein anderer Musiker schuf Melodien von solcher Feinheit und Noblesse, von solchem Adel. Seine Balladen, Scherzi, Etüden, Polonaisen, die 24 Préludes, die b-moll- und h-moll-Sonate, mit deren Finalsatz – wie Joachim Kaiser es einmal formulierte – »ein todkrankes Genie einen herrlichen, grandios überhitzten Hymnus auf die Gewalt des Lebens komponiert hat«, gehören zum festen Konzert- und Schallplattenrepertoire.

Chopins Biographie hingegen liegt weitgehend im Dunkel. Er, der sich zeitlebens »entzog«, der Weltoffenheit eines Franz Liszt diametral entgegengesetzt, vermittelte stets den Eindruck eines Leidenden, beinahe möchte man sagen: eines Märtyrers, fast schon so, als ob dies Teil oder gar Grundlage seiner Inspiration sein sollte. Nicht umsonst stempelte die belletristische Literatur ihn zum »tuberkulösen Schmerzensmann« und »schwindsüchtigen Salonromantiker«. Nach kristalliner Vollkommenheit strebend, residierte er stets im eigenen Schneckenhaus. Seine charakterliche Kompro-misslosigkeit zwang ihn letztlich auch zum Bruch seiner jahrelangen Bindung zu George Sand und deren Tochter Solange. Ein Einsamer, gewiss elitär, aber eben auch ein Leidender. Der Vergleich mit dem dänischen Philosophen Søren Kierkegaard erhellt das Gemeinte. Dieser soll als Kind den Berufswunsch »Märtyrer« geäußert haben. Zweifelsohne hatte auch Chopin etwas vom Kult dieses »Pater dolorosus«.

Obwohl bereits zu Lebzeiten eine europäische Berühmtheit, umgab ihn schon damals die Aura des Geheimnisvollen. Auch als ausübender Pianist nahm er eine Sonderstellung ein. Sein Spiel wird von allen Zeitgenossen als etwas einzigartig Individuelles geschildert. Äußerst selten erschien er auf dem Konzertpodium, fieberhaft erwartet von seinen Anhängern, »denn der, auf den man wartete, war nicht nur ein geschickter Virtuose, ein in der Kunst der Noten erfahrener Pianist; es war nicht nur ein Künstler von hohem Ansehen, er war das alles und mehr noch als das alles – es war Chopin«, schreibt Franz Liszt 1841 in der Rezension eines Chopin-Konzertes. Liszt äußert sich weiter über Chopins Zurückgezogenheit: »Was aber für jeden anderen der sichere Weg ins Vergessenwerden und in ein obskures Dasein gewesen wäre, verschaffte ihm im Gegenteil ein über alle Capricen der Mode erhabenes Ansehen. […] So blieb diese kostbare, wahrlich hohe und überragend vornehme Berühmtheit verschont von allen Angriffen.«

Den Grund für seine Zurückgezogenheit und sein seltenes Erscheinen auf dem Podium erklärt Chopin selbst, und seine Bemerkung zu Liszt, dessen Virtuosität Chopin stets bewunderte, ist entsprechend aufschlussreich: »Ich eigne mich nicht dazu, Konzerte zu geben; das Publikum schüchtert mich ein, sein Atem erstickt, seine neugierigen Blicke lähmen mich, ich verstumme vor den fremden Gesichtern. Aber Du bist dazu berufen; denn wenn Du Dein Publikum nicht gewinnst, bist Du doch imstande, es zu unterwerfen.«

Franz Liszt charakterisierte Chopin in seiner Chopin-Biographie von 1851:
»Wenn auch diese Blätter nicht ausreichen, von Chopin so zu reden, wie es unseren Wünschen entsprechen würde, so hoffen wir doch, daß der Zauber, den sein Name mit vollem Recht ausübt, all das hinzufügen wird, was unseren Worten fehlt. Chopin erlosch, indem er sich allmählich in seiner eigenen Glut verzehrte. Sein Leben, das sich fern von allen öffentlichen Ereignissen abspielte, war gleichsam ein körperloses Etwas, das sich nur in den Spuren offenbart, die er uns in seinen musikalischen Werken hinterlassen hat. Er hat sein Leben in einem fremden Lande ausgehaucht, das ihm nie zu einer neuen Heimat wurde; er hielt seinem ewig verwaisten Vaterland die Treue. Er war ein Dichter mit einer von Geheimnissen erfüllten und von Schmerzen durchwühlten Seele.«

Wesentlich ist auch für das Verständnis und die Interpretation von Chopin und seiner Musik der Begriff der „Askesis“ im Sinne der griechischen Ethoslehre: „Askesis“ nicht etwa im Sinne von “Verzicht“ oder „Entsagung“, sondern gerade dem Gegenteil, nämlich des unabingbaren „Dran-Bleibens“ an der Sache: Eine Eigenschaft, die ihn auch mit wenig anderen Großen der Musikgeschichte verband: Bach, Mozart – um nur zwei zu nennen: Niemals nachlassende Energie, die ein Kunstwerk bis zu seiner letzten Form prägte. Verfolgt man die Entstehung der großen Werke Chopins, so sieht man die ungeheure Entwicklung. Selbst an Verzierungen arbeitete er unerbittlich, entwarf mehrere Versionen, um letztendlich zu einer ganz bestimmten Version zu finden, die er als bindend ansah.

In diesem Zusammenhang ist auch seine tiefe Bindung zu Bach zu verstehen.

So hatte Chopin Das Wohltemperierte Klavier, die neue Pariser Ausgabe, mit nach Mallorca gebracht und widmete sich einem besonderen Studium des Hauptwerkes von Johann Sebastian Bach.

Die Liebe für Bach verbindet ihn mit Felix Mendelssohn, auch mit Ferdinand Hiller. Mit Hiller und Liszt hatte Chopin Bachs Konzert für drei Klaviere aufgeführt. Bach bedeutet für Chopin Größe und Ordnung und Ruhe. Bach bedeutet auch Geborgenheit in der Vergangenheit. Nach der sehnt er sich immer und überall zurück. Bereits in frühester Jugend wurde Chopin durch seinen Warschauer Lehrer Wojciech Żywny auf Bachs Werke aufmerksam gemacht – für den damaligen Zeitgeschmack höchst ungewöhnlich. Seine Schüler lässt Chopin im Wesentlichen Bachs Präludien und Fugen studieren, und in den beiden Wochen, in denen er sich einmal im Jahr auf ein Konzert im größeren Rahmen vorbereitet, spielt er ausschließlich Bach. Bereits in seinen Études hat Chopin gezeigt, wie gut er selbst jene Gesetze der Logik und Konstruktion beherrscht, die er bei Bach bewundert. Nun komponiert Chopin seine 24 Préludes op. 28 und knüpft erneut an Bachs Tradition an. Zwar folgt keinem seiner Préludes eine Fuge, dennoch ist jedes Stück in sich geschlossen und birgt eine eigene Aussage. Wie Bachs Wohltemperiertes Klavier ist Chopins Zyklus auf vierundzwanzig Einheiten angelegt und umfasst alle zwölf Töne in Dur und Moll; allerdings sind sie gemäß dem Quintenzirkel angeordnet und nicht in einer chromatischen Fortschreitung der Tonarten.

In einer Rezension in der Revue et Gazette musicale vom 2. Mai 1841 schreibt Franz Liszt über Chopins Konzert vom 26. April 1841: »Die Préludes von Chopin sind Kompositionen von ganz außergewöhnlichem Rang. Es sind nicht nur, wie der Titel vermuten ließe, Stücke, die als Einleitung für andere Stücke bestimmt sind, es sind poetische Vorspiele, ähnlich denjenigen eines großen zeitgenössischen Dichters [gemeint ist vermutlich Lamartine], die die Seele in goldenen Träumen wiegen und sie in ideale Regionen emporheben. Bewundernswert in ihrer Vielfalt, lassen sich die Arbeit und die Kenntnis, die in ihnen stecken, nur durch gewissenhafte Prüfung ermessen. Alles erscheint hier von erstem Wurf, von Elan, von plötzlicher Eingebung zu sein. Sie haben die freie und große Allüre, die die Werke eines Genies kennzeichnet.«

Robert Schumann stimmten die Préludes op. 28 hingegen ratlos: »Es sind Skizzen, Etudenanfänge, oder will man, Ruinen, einzelne Adlerfittige, alles bunt und wild durcheinander. Auch Krankes, Fieberhaftes, Abstoßendes enthält das Heft; so suche jeder, was ihm frommt.«

Möglicherweise erkannte Schumann hier bereits eigene Wesenszüge. Zumindest sah er sich Vorwürfen dieser Art auch schon ausgesetzt. So schreibt der Kritiker Rellstab 1839 in der Rezension von Schumanns Kinderszenen von »Fieberträumen« und »Seltsamkeiten«.

Chopin selbst reagierte hingegen ärgerlich, als George Sand von »nachahmender Tonmalerei« sprach, und er protestierte mit aller Kraft gegen theatralische Deutungen. »Er hatte recht«, gestand später George Sand einsichtig. Ebenso hätte ihn wütend gemacht, wie sie über das Prélude in Des-Dur schrieb und es in mystische Erlebnisse und Sphären transferierte: »Das Prélude, das er an jenem Abend komponierte, war wohl voll der Regentropfen, die auf den klingenden Ziegeln der Kartause widerhallten; in seiner Fantasie aber und in seinem Gesang hatten sich diese Tropfen in Tränen verwandelt, die vom Himmel in sein Herz fielen.«
Tatsächlich komponierte Chopin auf Mallorca nicht anders als sonst: nobel, majestätisch, elegisch.

Zu meiner eigenen Interpretation: ALLE Interpretationen dieser neuen Edition sind Neu-Aufnahmen, die in mehreren recording-sessions in den teldex-studios in Berlin gemeinsam mit den Produzenten Friedemann Engelbrecht, Tobias Lehmann und Julian Schwenkner entstanden sind. Das Instrument, einer meiner eigenen Steinways ist ein ganz besonderes Instrument, das von Georges Ammann stets meisterhaft intoniert wurde. Das Arbeiten mit diesem Team vollzog sich in einer regelrechten Trance, kennen wir uns seit vielen Jahren und vertrauen einander. Bereits die Goldberg-Variationen hatte ich mit Engelbrecht und Schwenkner (erschienen 2007 auf Bayer) eingespielt, ebenso die‚ Chopin-Schumann Anniversary Edition’ von 2010 (erschienen auf MSR-Classics, USA, im Jahre 2010). Bezieht man die von Ihnen erwähnte Einspielung von 2003 der Balladen und anderen großen Werken (erschienen auf Bayer) mit ein, handelt es sich in der nun vorliegenden Edition also bereits um die dritte Version einiger Interpretationen. Beispielsweise der Balladen, der Fantaisie op. 49, der Barcarolle op. 60 und der Polonaise-Fantaisie op. 61. Gerade in der Barcarolle und der Polonaise-Fantaisie spürt man ganz besonders meine persönlich-künstlerische Entwicklung an und mit den Werken. Insgesamt ist es ein Leben ‚mit’ jenen Werken, die meine letzten Jahre der Beschäftigung mit Chopin prägten. Man kann aber hier auch deutlich die Unterschiede der Akustik und den damit verbundenen Einfluss auf Interpretation sehen: Während die Einspielung von 2003 in der Friedrich.Ebert-Halle in Hamburg entstand, wurden die Einspielungen 2010 in einem ganz besonderen Saal, dem altehrwürdigen Rundfunkzentrum in der Nalepastraße in Berlin realisiert. Auch jeweils unterschiedliche Steinways (ebenfalls mein Eigentum) sind hier zu hören. Die hier aktuell vorliegenden Einspielungen sind allesamt in den teldex-studios entstanden. Wahrheit der Musik, Wahrheit des Klanges und Wahrheit der Interpretation bilden für mich ein „untrennbares Ganzes“. Darin sehe ich die Verwirklichung meiner persönlichen „Askesis“ …

Vielen Dank für diese ausführliche und weitschweifende Antwort, die bereits einige meiner weiteren geplanten Fragen beantworten konnte und die auch vieles beinhaltet, was in Ihrem Booklettext ausgeführt wird.

Doch entsprechend bieten Ihre Worte auch viele Anknüpfungspunkte für neue Fragen. Zunächst interessant ist natürlich das Paradoxon, Chopin habe die Grenzen der Romantik neu definiert, sei aber gleichzeitig einseitig gewesen und habe sich nicht weiterentwickelt. Ist also diese Neudefinition Ihrer Ansicht nach ein spontaner Glücksgriff, ein ganz persönlich geborener Stil, der ohne Entwicklungsprozess sofort voll ausgereift und dergestalt für künftige Generationen richtungsweisend war? Anders lassen sich aus meiner Perspektive die zwei widersprechenden Thesen nicht kombinieren – oder sehen Sie einen dieser beiden divergierenden Aussprüche als unzutreffend an?

Und was hat es mit der Beschränkung auf das Klavier auf sich? In allen Werken Chopins tritt das Klavier auf, hinzugenommenes Orchester, Cello, Singstimme oder andere Mitstreiter sind die absolute Ausnahme. War diese Einseitigkeit entscheidend für den Individualstil und die (sofern doch existierende) Entwicklung Chopins? Wäre seine Musik überhaupt für andere Besetzungen denkbar?


Man muß unterscheiden und deutlich voneinander trennen: Zum einen sehen wir uns mit Alexander Scriabin und dessen Haltung zu Chopin konfrontiert. Selbstverständlich war Scriabin (im übrigen auch einer meiner Favoriten!) in seiner ersten kompositorischen Schaffensperiode ein Epigone Chopins. Boris Pasternak, einst ein väterlicher Freund Scriabins – schrieb: „… auf den Fenstersimsen lagen die verstaubten Archive Chopins …“. Seine erste Schaffensperiode steht deutlich unter dem Einfluss Chopins. Besonders die Préludes op. 11 drücken jenes Spannungsfeld. Mit der Sonate Nr. 3 in fis-moll op. 23 schloß Scriabin die Orientierung an der „Tradition“ ab. Von nun an geht sein Denken in eine völlig andere Richtung. Ich bin sicher, ohne Scriabin und besonders der dritten Schaffensphase hätte die gesamte Musikgeschichte eine andere Entwicklung genommen. ER war es, der die Zwölftontechnik begründete: Der „accord mystique“, im Zentrum der Werke stehend, war Energieträger für sämtliche Ideen. Scriabins früher Tod – musikgeschichtlich zweifelsohne tragisch – birgt dennoch ein versöhnliches Fazit, erscheint eine kompositorische Weiterentwicklung nach seinen letzten Werken fast unmöglich. Zumindest schwer vorstellbar wie Scriabin hätte weiterverfahren sollen, wäre ihm ein längeres Leben gegönnt gewesen. Unter diesem Blickwinkel ist auch zu versehen, dass Scriabin in einem Interview vom 28. März 1910 äußerte: „Chopin ist ungemein musikalisch, und darin ist er all seinen Zeitgenossen voraus. Er hätte mit seiner Begabung zum größten Komponisten der Welt werden können; aber leider entsprach sein Intellekt nicht seinen musikalischen Qualitäten. […] Merkwürdigerweise hat sich Chopin als Komponist so gut wie überhaupt nicht entwickelt. Fast vom ersten Opus an steht er als fertiger Komponist da, mit einer deutlich abgegrenzten Individualität“. Scriabin stand für eine völlig andere kompositorische Entwicklung, nämlich derjenigen, die sich an „Experimentierung“ orientierte. Chopin hingegen vertraute der „klassischen Tradition“ und entwickelte aus deren Energiefelder jene puristische Form der Musik, die andere,,unter anderem auch Robert Schumann, in der damaligen Zeit missverstanden.

Friedrich Nietzsche beschreib in „Menschliches, Allzumenschliches II“ von 1877– 79 sehr gut das „Festhalten“ in der Tradition, welches er als „Konvention“ deutet: „Der letzte der neueren Musiker, der die Schönheit geschaut und angebetet hat, gleich Leopardi, der Pole Chopin, der Unnachahmliche – alle vor ihm und nach ihm Gekommenen haben auf dies Beiwort kein Anrecht – Chopin hatte dieselbe fürstliche Vornehmheit der Konvention, welche Raffael im Gebrauche der herkömmlichsten einfachsten Farben zeigt, – aber nicht in Bezug auf Farben, sondern auf die melodischen und rhythmischen Herkömmlichkeiten. Diese ließ er gelten, als geboren in der Etikette, aber wie der freieste und anmutigste Geist in diesen Fesseln spielend und tanzend – und zwar ohne sie zu verhöhnen“. Insofern in konkreter Beantwortung Ihrer Frage: Ja, eindeutig ein „Glücksgriff“, ein ganz persönlicher Stil, der ohne Entwicklungsprozess voll ausgereift war und für Generationen richtungsweisend war, ein Zusammentreffen vieler Parameter und Kräfteballungen sowie Energiefelder, aber auch soziologische Aspekte, die jene Konzentration ermöglicht haben.

So ist jene Beschränkung auf das Medium der 88 Tasten als eine ästhetische Konzentration zu verstehen. Durch die völlige Identifizierung mit dem Instrument, welche in der radikalen Hervorbringung von Lyrik und Dramatik, Phantasie und Leidenschaft und deren einzigartiger Verschmelzung eine Tonsprache von aristokratischem Stilempfinden, formaler, klassischer Schulung und Formempfinden sowie Strenge vereinte, ist eine „Besetzung“ für anderes Instrumentarium schwerlich vorstellbar. Chopins punktgenaues Denken erlaubte daher auch keine Experimente, weswegen er bezüglich seines stilistischen Denkens auch nicht »umherirrte«, wie Scriabin es beispielsweise getan hat. Umgekehrt gilt, dass „Transkriptionen“ seiner Werke ebenso ins Leere laufen und die innere Essenz niemals zur Geltung bringen kann.

Bezeichnend ist, dass Anton Rubinstein, selbst Pianist und Virtuose, in Die Musik und ihre Meister, 1891 jene „Konzentration“ auf das Klavier folgendermaßen charakterisierte: „Alle bisher Genannten [aufgeführt waren u. a. Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Weber, Schumann, Mendelssohn] haben ihr Intimstes, ja, ich möchte beinahe sagen ihr Schönstes dem Clavier anvertraut, – aber der Clavier-Barde, der Clavier-Rhapsode, der Clavier-Geist, die Clavier-Seele ist Chopin. – Ob dieses Instrument ihm, oder er diesem Instrument eingehaucht hat, wie er dafür schrieb, weiß ich nicht, aber nur ein gänzliches In-einander-Aufgehen konnte solche Compositionen ins Leben rufen. Tragik, Romantik, Lyrik, Heroik, Dramatik, Phantastik, Seelisches, Herzliches, Träumerisches, Glänzendes, Großartiges, Einfaches, überhaupt alle möglichen Ausdrücke finden sich in seinen Compositionen für dieses Instrument und alles Das erklingt bei ihm auf diesem Instrument in schönster Äußerung“.

Scriabin ist zweifelsohne ein sehr interessanter Fortführer Chopins und leitet ja tatsächlich auch direkt über in die freie Tonalität. Aber darf ich fragen, wieso ausgerechnet der mystische Akkord oder Prometheusakkord (ein von Scriabin gefundener sechsstimmiger Quartenakkord, der statt einer Grundtondefinition ein Klangzentrum bildet; auf dem Zentrum C lauten seine Töne C-Fis-Ais-E-A-D) Initiator der 12-Ton-Technik sein soll? Natürlich weicht er vom klassischen Tonalitätsempfinden ab, doch schafft er noch immer Zentren, die ja gerade im Prometheus auch lange Zeit stabil bleiben, und sucht nicht die völlige Auflösung von Bezügen, sondern das Schaffen neuer Verbindungen.

Jedoch zurück zu Chopin. Sie machten bereits einige Aussagen, wie Frédéric Chopin selber am Klavier gespielt und wie er seinen Schülern doch ganz andere Sachen beigebracht haben muss. Gibt es genauere Quellen, die auf sein Spiel und seine Lehrmethoden eingehen und was ist uns überliefert? Und wie sieht es heute aus, sollten wir uns an sein Spiel halten, oder an seine gelehrten Methoden – oder sollten wir doch davon Abstand nehmen und einen eigenen Zugang zu Chopins Musik suchen?

Wir finden bei Scriabin anfangs bei mit erstaunlich eigener Gestik eine vermengte subtile Chopin-Nachfolge, die Elemente Liszts, Schumanns und Brahms ebenso integrierte wie neutrales Salonpathos – und das alles unter Vermeidung folkloristischer Anklänge. Von hier aus gelangte er zu einem exakt kalkulierbaren harmonischen System von transponierbaren Quartenakkorden. Von hier aus erreichte sein Denkstil immer mehr elitär-arrogante Bereiche individualspekulativer Selbstüberhöhung auf der Basis einer regelrecht verformten Theosophie. Seine Tagesbuchnotizen lesen sich wie eine riesige Kluft zwischen seinem bedeutsamen künstlerischen Schaffen einerseits und jenen merkwürdigen persönlich-denkerischer Züge andererseits. Seine Charakterzüge waren geprägt von Fatalismus, Egozentrik, Aktionswahn, Idealismus, Mystik, Prophetie und Hybris. Am Ende seines Lebens sah er sich sogar als Messias, der der Menschheit mit einem geplanten musikalisch-kultischen Riesenopus das Medium zur Läuterung vermitteln sollte. Auch wenn sein Versuch, die Musik zu erhöhen, sie mit Farben, Düften und Worten zu einem im Kern tief humanen Gesamtkunstwerk von bleibender Wirksamkeit zu geschalten, gescheitert ist, gehört rein musikalisch aber zu den geistigen und erregend differenziertesten Beständen der Kulturwelt. Hierdurch weist sich Scriabin als Persönlichkeit aus, die Scriabin als Persönlichkeit der um 1870 geborenen Komponisten die stilistisch-harmonische und tonale Landschaft des anbrechenden 20. Jahrhunderts neu definierte.

Auch wenn bei Schönberg die 12-Tonreihe am Anfang eines Werkes das entscheidend-strukturelle Medium darstellt, so ist es gerade bei Scriabin der im Zentrum eines Werkes sehende Prometheusakkord, der von hier aus Energien nach vorne und hinten ausstrahlt, serielle Techniken bzw. Variations- und Montagetechniken bildet und im übrigen eine kleine Sekund nach oben – also chromatisch – transponiert alle 12 Töne der Skale repräsentiert.

Versucht man Scriabin zu „erklären“, so findet man bei Boris Pasternak folgende Zeilen: „Das war die erste Ansiedlung des Menschen in Welten, die Wagner für Fabelwesen und Mastadons entdeckt hatte, Paukensachläge und chromatische Wasserfälle aus Trompeten, die so kalt klangen wie Strahl einer Feuerspritze, scheuchten sie hinweg … über dem Zaun der Symphonie glühte die Sonne van Goghs. Auf ihren Fenstersimsen lagen die verstaubten Archive Chopins … ich konnte diese Musik nicht ohne Tränen anhören.“

Bei Chopin wissen wir über seine zahlreichen Schüler – hauptsächlich davon verdiente er sein Geld – genau, wie und was er unterrichtete. Beispielsweise Karol Mikuli: Mikuli studierte zuerst in Wien Medizin, ging aber 1844 nach Paris und wurde Schüler Chopins – später war er dessen Assistent – und Rebers in der Komposition. Die Revolution 1848 vertrieb ihn in seine Heimat. Nachdem er sich als Pianist durch Konzerte in verschiedenen österreichischen, russischen und rumänischen Städten bekanntgemacht, wurde er 1858 zum künstlerischen Direktor des Galizischen Musikvereins zu Lemberg (Konservatorium, Konzerte und so weiter) gewählt. 1888 trat er von der Leitung des Musikvereins zurück und leitete nur noch eine Privatschule. Er veröffentlichte die erste Gesamtausgabe der Werke Chopins, deren unübertroffener Interpret er bis zum Ende seines Lebens war. Mikulis Ausgabe von Chopins Werken (Kistner) enthält viele Korrekturen und Varianten nach Chopins eigenhändigen Randbemerkungen in Mikulis Schulexemplar. Sie sollten für uns bindend sein. Auch ich orientiere mich an ihnen.

Moscheles, selbst einer der bedeutendsten Pianisten des 19. Jahrhunderts, findet 1839 die vielleicht aussagekräftigsten und schönsten Worte zu Chopins pianistischem Rang und Können: »Sein [Chopins] Aussehen ist ganz mit seiner Musik identificirt, beide zart und schwärmerisch. Er spielte mir auf meine Bitten vor, und jetzt erst verstehe ich seine Musik, erkläre mir auch die Schwärmerei der Damenwelt. Sein ad libitum-Spielen, das bei den Interpreten seiner Musik in Taktlosigkeit ausartet, ist bei ihm nur die liebenswürdigste Originalität des Vortrags; die dilettantisch harten Modulationen, über die ich nicht hinwegkomme, wenn ich seine Sachen spiele, choquiren mich nicht mehr, weil er mit seinen zarten Fingern elfenartig leicht darüber hingleitet; sein Piano ist so hingehaucht, daß er keines kräftigen Forte bedarf, um die gewünschten Contraste hervorzubringen; so vermißt man nicht die orchesterartigen Effecte, welche die deutsche Schule von einem Klavierspieler verlangt, sondern läßt sich hinreißen, wie von einem Sänger, der wenig bekümmert um die Begleitung ganz seinem Gefühl folgt; genug, er ist ein Unicum in der Clavierspielerwelt.«

Viel diskutiert blieb auch die Art und Weise seines Rubatos, wo die Aussagen seiner Zeitgenossen ein völlig unterschiedliches Bild ergeben. »Sein Spiel war stets nobel und schön, immer sangen seine Töne, ob in voller Kraft, ob im leisesten piano. Unendliche Mühe gab er sich, dem Schüler dieses gebundene, gesangsreiche Spiel beizubringen. ›Il (elle) nesaitpaslierdeuxnotes [Er (sie) weiß nicht, wie man zwei Töne miteinander verbindet]‹, das war sein schärfster Tadel. Ebenso verlangte er, im strengsten Rhythmus zu bleiben, haßte alles Dehnen und Zerren, unangebrachtes Rubato sowie übertriebenes Ritardando. ›Je vousprie de vousasseoir [Bitte, bleiben Sie sitzen]‹, sagte er bei solchem Anlaß mit leisem Hohn.« Diese Aussage einer Schülerin polarisierte ganze Generationen von Klavierprofessoren im Bemühen um den Begriff »Rubato«, vor allem aufgrund auch anderslautender, gewichtiger Worte, beispielsweise denjenigen von Berlioz, die in Chopins Spiel übertriebene Freiheit und allzugroße Willkür sahen: »Chopin ertrug nur schwer das Joch der Takteinteilung; er hat meiner Meinung nach die rhythmische Unabhängigkeit viel zu weit getrieben. […] Chopin konnte nicht gleichmäßig spielen.« Offenbar gestattete er seinen Schülern jene Freiheiten nicht, die er für sich selbst relativierte.

Weitere Schüler/Schülerinnen waren u.a. Marcelina Czartoryska, Émile Decombes, Carl Filtsch, Adolphe Gutmann, Maria Kalergis, Georges Mathias, Delfina Potocka, Charlotte de Rothschild, Jane Stirling, Thomas Tellefsen und Pauline Viardot.

Chopin selbst arbeitete am Schluß seines eigenen Lebens noch an einer eigenen Klavierschule, die, wie man nach Aufzeichnungen weiß, Methodik (er komponierte ja auch eigens „pour la Méthode des Méthodes de Moscheles et Fétis“, die in zweiseitigen Übungen 1841 von Maurice Schlesinger ohne Opuszahl veröffentlicht wurden) und Technik neu definieren sollte. Leider kam es zur finalen Fertigstellung nicht mehr …

Die Tradition und Stilistik des Chopin-Spiels hat sich ja auch stetig verändert. Paderewski, Cortot, Rubinstein, Pollini, Zimerman, Pogorelic, Schliessmann …

Sicher eine jeweilige Frage der Zeit des jeweiligen Zeitgeistes und der damit verbundenen Erkenntnisse …

Wie Sie so klar formulierten, verändert sich das Chopinspiel immer weiter und viele Pianisten bringen neue Aspekte ans Licht. Wo sehen Sie sich in dieser Tradition der Chopinrezeption? Versuchen Sie sich an das zu halten, was über Chopins eigenes Spiel bekannt ist oder doch eher an das, was er gelehrt hat? Oder wollen Sie einen neuen Weg einschlagen und die Entwicklung der sich verändernden Traditionen weiterführen?

Kaum ein Spiel bzw. eine Stilistik hat sich im Laufe der Jahre immer wieder derart stark verändert, wie diejenige des Chopin-Spiels. Tatsächlich hat man auch früher von regelrecht typischen „Chopin-Spielern“ gesprochen. Cortot war zum Beispiel ein solcher. Auch wenn ich ihn unglaublich schätze und verehre, gerade wegen seines intuitiv-inspirierten und improvisatorischen Spiels, war sein Spiel am Schluss, bestimmt auch wegen seiner Krankheit und des damit verbundenen Morphinismus, außerordentlich manieriert und entmaterialisiert. Die unmittelbare „Antwort“ darauf war Rubinstein: Sein Spiel männlich-kraftvoll, die klassizistische Note und damit Strenge von Chopin hervorhebend (Beethoven sah er als Romantiker!), war er der Gegenpol zu Cortot. Er „rückte gerade“, was Cortot entmaterialisiert hatte. Man muß sich dies ähnlich vorstellen wie die vielen Bach-Interpretationen nach der Wiederentdeckung durch die Wiederaufführung der Matthäuspassion Bachs durch Mendelssohn: Wie viele regelrechte Entstellungen mußte Bach seit diesem Zeitpunkt „erfahren“, so dass eine Wiederherstellung der Ordnung durch Rosalyn Tureck und insbesondere Glenn Gould mehr als notwendig war. „Interpretations-Kultur“ – bezeichne ich jenes Phänomen. Es ist die Verantwortung eines Interpreten, die Antwort auf die Errungenschaften eines Kollegen zu geben. Anders wären auch Persönlichkeiten in der Chopin-Tradition nach Rubinstein wie Argerich, Pollini, Zimerman, Pogorelich etc. nicht denkbar.

Sie führen viele der auf „Chronological Chopin“ eingespielten Werke bereits seit längerer Zeit im Repertoire und haben viele davon schon einmal auf einer CD festgehalten. Wie verändert der zeitliche Abstand die Art, Chopin zu spielen? Gibt es dabei Grundtendenzen, werden die Werke beispielsweise langsamer, weil nun mehr zwischen den Tönen entstehen kann, oder verändert sich die Art und Ausführung des Rubatos?

Ich selbst sehe mich in jener Tradition, Altes mit Neuem zu verbinden, lese ständig unterschiedliche Texte und setze mich extrem mit den »Verzierungen« auseinander, da diese einem ganz besonderen Augenmerk bedürfen. Im Anhang der ‚Paderewski-Edition‘ beispielsweise kann man viel lernen … Dies ist durch seine eigenen Handschriften überliefert und bindend. Am Rubato kann man auch wenig ändern: Willkürliches gibt es bei Chopin nicht, dafür hat er selbst viel zu lange an seinen Handschriften gesessen. An einem Werk wie der F-Dur Ballade saß er von 1836 – 1839. Den Schluss änderte er mehrmals: Noch Robert Schumann hörte ihn in F-Dur, bevor ihn Chopin endgültig in fahles a-moll abdunkelte und das Werk balladesk beendete.

Dennoch: Ihre Frage beantworte zumindest ich – ich denke, es steht mir zu – mit einem klaren Ja: Selbstverständlich habe ich eine Vision und möchte die Weiterentwicklung der Chopin-Interpretation vorantreiben. Insbesondere klanglich: Jener Aspekt ist mir heilig, an jener Komponente weder ich ein Leben lang arbeiten. Ich bin Synästhetiker und sehe die Welt der Klänge in Farben. Insbesondere deshalb blicke ich sowohl über 88 Tasten und über ein Orchester hinaus …

Generell denke ich über Grenzen hinweg und sehe ausschließlich jene Komponente, die als Transzendenz jenseits einer Komposition zu finden ist. Es ist eine Vision, von der ich geleitet werde, eine Vorstellung, die selbst die Kräfte (m)einer Intuition bei weitem überschreitet.

Auf keinen Fall werden die Werke im Laufe der Zeit langsamer beziehungsweise sind langsamer geworden, im Gegenteil. Heute betone ich eher sogar die virtuose Linie. Aber die „objektive Richtigkeit“ hat sich verändert. Wenn man derart intensiv wie ich das Leben mit den Werken verbringt, so weiß man auch schnell, wo die „Durchlässigkeit“ für Freiheiten liegt und wo diese gestattet sind. Ich selbst kann über mich und meine Interpretationen sagen, dass die »innere Stimmigkeit« „runder“ wird. Der angestrebte, große Bogen wird deckungsgleicher mit meiner Vision …

Auch diese Antwort bietet wieder sehr viele Anknüpfungspunkte. Dazu interessiert mich zunächst, was Sie damit meinen, es gäbe kein willkürliches Rubato? Oder anders gefragt, wie und an welchen Stellen hat dann das Rubato zu sein und wie genau sollte es ausgeführt werden?

Sie haben vor allem den Klang betont und dass Sie über den Rand des Konzertflügels hinaus blicken. Welchen Klang streben Sie denn an, wie hat dieser zu sein und an was orientiert er sich?


»Rubato« ist ein musikalisches Phänomen, was niemals „willkürlich“ sein darf, etwas, was minuziös geplant sein muß und auch exakt – falls man den Text genau liest und ihn versteht – im Text direkt und indirekt verankert ist bzw. daraus hervorgeht. Bei ‚Chopin‘ darf Rubato niemals willkürlich eingesetzt werden. Bereits Artur Schnabel (von mir hochverehrt) hat Rubato bei Chopin „gelehrt“. Gerade ER war es ja auch, der Notentexte generell intellektuell verstanden hat und erst danach seinem Gefühl vertraute. Auch für mich ist das „Chopinsche-Rubato“ klar: Die Gestaltung beruht auf der „Linienführung des Basses“: Bleibt diese gleich bzw. liegt sie auf einem repetierenden »Orgelpunkt«, so darf das Tempo in keiner Weise verändert werden. Erst mit der Veränderung der melodischen Linienführung des Basses darf (auch) das Tempo variieren. Ein Effekt von ungeheurer Wirkung, die, entsprechend eingesetzt, beklemmend sein kann.

Umso geplanter und sparsamer »Rubato» eingesetzt wird, umso bedeutungsvoller ist jedes Detail. »Rubato« unterliegt der inneren Struktur und Gesetzmäßigkeit einer Komposition.

Genauso ist es mit »Klang«: Ich habe eine absolut konkrete Vorstellung von jedem einzelnen Ton: Sowohl demjenigen, den ich selbst spiele, aber auch vom Instrument selbst. Letztlich ist es eine Einheit. Der Ton eines Instruments beruht aber auch auf dessen mechanischen Regulierungen, auch hier konvergieren alle Kräfte zu einem großen Ganzen. Der »Klang«, den ich anstrebe und bevorzuge, ist ein sonorer, runder und tragfähiger Klang ohne jegliche Härte. In jedem Ton lebt eine eigene Welt. Seit vielen Jahren (genau gesagt seit 1984) arbeite ich mit Georges Ammann, jenem berühmten Techniker von STEINWAY & SONS, der ebenso exakte Vorstellungen von Klang und Regulierung eines Instruments hat und dies als Einheit sieht. Bei meinen Aufnahmen ist er ständig an meiner Seite – wir sind ein absolut verläßliches Team …

Den Konzertflügel fasse ich als „Streichinstrument“ auf. Perkussion ist mir fremd und ein völlig methodisches Missverständnis: Einzig die »Streichergruppe« ist in der Hervorbringung eines Tones und dem Nachzeichnen des horizontalen Verlaufs eines Notentextes methodisch verwandt. Und hierin liegt das große Missverständnis, pädagogisch-methodisch insbesondere der Asiaten: Da das perkussive Element die gesamte Technik beherrscht, ist deren „Klang“ (?) metallisch hart.

Ich selbst orientiere mich am ‚Cello‘: Das Cello verfügt über jenen sonoren-tragfähigen Klang, wird ja auch als „Verlängerung der menschlichen Stimme“ bezeichnet. Hinzu kommt eine sexuell-erotische Komponente dieses Instruments.

„Wenn wir uns die vom Tanz dominierte Musik Bachs anhören, wird uns unweigerlich bewußt, dass er, wiewohl er von der barocken Sicht des Tanzes als menschliche und weltliche Ordnung ausgegangen sein mag, dessen alte religiös magische Implikationen wieder heraufbeschwor“. So beginnt das Kapitel mit der Überschrift „Stimme und Körper: Bachs Solocellosuiten als Apotheose des Tanzes“ in Wilfrid Meilers‘ Buch Bach and the Dance of God. Meilers legt in der Folge nahe, dass wir „wenn wir uns das Zeitalter des Barock als den Triumph des Humanismus nach der Renaissance vorstellen, die sexuelle Symbolik von Bogen und Saite als allumfassend akzeptieren [können]. Das Instrument ist weiblich passiv, der Bogen männlich aktiv; zusammen führen sie zur Schöpfung“. Außerdem stellt er fest, dass „Bachs Musik für Solovioline und für Solocello die vollendetste Manifestierung dieser Vermenschlichung eines Instrumentes [ist]“ und dass das Cello, noch mehr als die Violine, den gesamten Menschen widerspiegelt. Der Grund dafür ist, behauptet er, dass „sein Timbre von allen Instrumenten dem einer männlichen Stimme mit großem Umfang am ähnlichsten [ist]; was das Körperliche anbelangt, so erfordert es Bewegungen der Arme, des Rumpfes und der Schultern, was bedeutet, dass man beim Cellospielen gleichzeitig im Takt singt und tanzt“.

… und exakt so fasse ich den Konzertflügel auf. …

Bezüglich der »Methodik« meine ich die Einbeziehung des gesamten Armes (von der Handwurzel bishin zum Oberarm und der Schulter) und dessen Linienführung sowie des gesamten Körpers zur Hervorbringung eines Tones sowie des Nachzeichnens der horizontalen Linie des Notentextes.

Sie hoben hervor, die virtuose Linie mittlerweile mehr zu betonen, aber war Chopin nicht eher der vordergründigen Virtuosität abgeneigt und nutzte sie rein zum Ausdruck seiner Musikalität? Warum sollte dann eben dieses Element hervorgehoben werden?

Mit der „virtuosen Linie“ möchte ich nicht missverstanden werden: Natürlich ist hier keine „vordergründige Virtuosität“ gemeint, sondern jene Ebene der Allumfassenheit, der Selbstverständlichkeit, der alle Bereiche der objektiven, aber auch subjektiven Richtigkeit miteinschließt. Jene von mir angesprochene Virtuosität beschreibt eben jene bereits angesprochene Transzendenz, wo Schwerelosigkeit und Bedeutungsvolles sowie Ebenmäßigkeit des Ablaufs zu einer Einheit verschmelzen … Bedeutung des Moments und Forderung der Sache …

Der Pianist Artur Schnabel, ein hochgeschätzer Beethovenapologet, bezeichnete Chopin spöttisch als einen rechtshändigen Melodiker. Andererseits schätzte Brahms, bekanntlich ein ausgewiesener Kontrapunktiker, Chopin und dessen Werke außerordentlich, setzte sich für sie ein und verlegte sogar einige. Was für eine Bedeutung als Komponist würden Sie Chopin innerhalb dieses Meinungsdisputes attestieren?

Ein hochspannender Themenkomplex. Tatsächlich war Artur Schnabel ein hochgeschätzter Beethovenapologet, der in dieser Generation und in dieser Zeit eine Revolution bzgl. der Interpretation der ‚Klassischen Klaviermusik‘, insbesondere der Beethoven-Interpretation, begründete. Seine Art, »Text« zu lesen und zu verstehen, war einzigartig und bahnbrechend.
Spannungsfelder nach unterschiedlichen Parametern – melodische, harmonische, metrische und rhythmische Artikulation – entsprechend zu analysieren und zu einer neuen Einheit zusammenzufügen, blieb beispiellos.

In einer früheren Frage hatte ich Ihnen unter anderem geantwortet, dass es einst „typische Chopin-Interpreten“ wie beispielsweise Alfred Cortot gab. Es ist eine regelrechte „Charakter- und Stil-Frage“. Ich bin ganz sicher, dass Schnabel ein typischer „klassischer Interpret“ war; und so war er auch insbesondere für die Interpretation der Musik von Mozart, Beethoven und Schubert berühmt. Das, was er in der Musik „suchte“ – stilistisch und charakterlich – konnte er mit seinem Verständnis bei Chopin schwerlich finden. Zumal man in „seiner“ Zeit Chopin primär als „romantischen“ Komponisten verstand und das „klassische Element“ in seinem Œuvre noch nicht erkannt hatte. Unter diesem Aspekt ist dann auch seine Abwertung, Chopin sei ein „rechtshändiger Melodiker“ gewesen, zu verstehen und zu relativieren.

Ebenso wie es immer wieder zur Diskussion kommt, ob Brahms selbst denn ein guter oder eher mäßiger bisweilen klobiger Pianist gewesen war. Zweifelsohne verfolgte Brahms eine komplett andere Stilistik, aber ich bin ganz sicher, jemand, der ein derart elegantes und hochvirtuoses Werk wie die Paganini-Variationen komponierte, muß pianistisch hochgeschult und stilistisch regelrecht revolutionär-modern gewesen sein. Insofern kann man seine Bewunderung für Chopin, der sich aus ästhetischen Gründen – wie bereits ausführlich dargelegt – auf das Medium der 88 Tasten konzentrierte, nachvollziehen und verstehen.

Wir sprachen bereits über musikalische Einflüsse und Werke, die Chopin besonders geschätzt hat. Doch wie sieht es mit persönlichen Bezügen aus? Welche Personen aus dem Leben des Komponisten haben ihn besonders inspiriert zum Komponieren? Hauptsächlich seine Liebschaften oder doch andere Begegnungen – oder hat er sich mit seiner unzweifelbar innerlichen und persönlichen Musik doch ganz von menschlichen Einflüssen gelöst?

Chopin hat Bach ganz besonders geschätzt. Das Wohltemperierte Klavier, die neue Pariser Ausgabe, hatte er mit nach Mallorca gebracht und widmete sich einem besonderen Studium des Hauptwerkes von Johann Sebastian Bach.

Alle Menschen, die Chopin nahe gestanden hatten, wußten, wie sehr er Mozarts Requiem geliebt hatte, dass er den Klavierauszug, ob auf Mallorca oder in Nohant, immer bei sich haben wollte und er in seinem Salon griffbereit auf Pergolesis Stabat Mater lag. Eugène Dalacroix war einer jener Freunde, die im Leben Chopins eine ganz besondere Rolle spielten. In einem letzten Gespräch mit ihm am 7. April 1849 war es um die Logik in der Musik gegangen: Chopin hatte damals Delacroix Harmonie und Kontrapunkt erklärt und den Aufbau einer Fuge verdeutlicht. Dann war das Gespräch auf Beethoven und Mozart gekommen. Beethoven lasse oft zeitlose Prinzipien außer Acht, hatte Chopin gesagt, Mozart niemals. Bei ihm hat jede einzelne Partie ihren Verlauf, aber immer in Zusammenhang mit den anderen; so entsteht die vollkommen gestaltete Melodie; das ist der Kontrapunkt, der punto contra punto.

So war auch sicher, dass bei Chopins Beerdigung beziehungsweise der Totenfeier in der Kirche St. Madeleine in Paris Mozarts Requiem aufgeführt werden sollte. Jeder wußte, wie sehr Chopin den weiblichen Gesang und Sängerinnen vergötterte, so hatten auch seine Schüler und Schülerinnen noch den Satz im Ohr: Sie müssen mit den Fingern singen. Viele Schülerinnen und Schüler hatte er zum Gesangsunterricht geschickt: Wenn Sie Klavier spielen wollen, müssen Sie singen lernen. Wer die vollkommen gestalteten Melodien singen sollte, stand auch schnell fest: Außer Chopins Freundin Pauline Viardot-Garcia hatten die Sopranistin Jeanne Castellan, der Tenor Alexis Dupont und der Bassist Luigi Lablache zugesagt. Siebzehn Jahre zuvor wurde Chopin von Lablache in Paris mit der Aufführung von zwei Rossini-Opern inspiriert: Otello und L’Italiana in Algeri.

Chopins engste Freunde, die ihn und sein Werk stets inspirierten, begleiteten ihn auch auf seinem letzten Weg: Auguste Franchomme, Eugène Delacroix, Adolf Gutmann, Hector Berliox, auch seine Verleger, waren gekommen und Camille Pleyel, der größte Teil des polnischen Exiladels, die Clésingers, seine Schüler und Schülerinnen … Finanziert wurde alles von Jane Starling, jener Schottin, die auch Chopin in den letzten Jahren nach der Trennung von Goerge Sand maßgeblich unterstützte und auch die Konzertreise 1848, jener „Ochsentour“, nach England sponsorte. So war es auch möglich, dass Chor und Orchester des Conservatoire zugesagt hatten und als Dirigent Narcisse Girard berufen werden konnte. Er hatte in den Jahren 1832 und 1834 in der Salle de Conservatoire am Dirigentenpult gestanden, als Chopin sein e-moll Konzert spielte.

Getragen wurde Chopins Kunst insbesondere durch eine gesellschaftliche Komponente, die maßgeblich durch George Sand und das Leben auf Nohant ermöglicht wurde. Hier traf man sich zum gegenseitigen Austausch. Zentral war hier immer wieder Augène Delacroix.

Wenn andere Komponisten der damaligen Zeit, beispielsweise Liszt, zu ihren eigenen Lebzeiten „Berühmtheits-Status“ erreichten, so war es sicherlich etwas Besonderes. Chopin allerdings erlangte zu Lebzeiten allerdings den Status von etwas „Legendärem“: Am 1. April 1847 fahren George Sand und Chopin in die Rue de Vaugirard in Paris. Sie steigen aus vor dem Renaissancepalast, den Maria de Medici als Witwe hatte erbauen lassen. Ein Palazzo mit Buckelquadern, wie sie ihn aus ihrer Kindheit in Florenz kannte. Für die Franzosen ist das seit langem nur ihr „Palais de Luxembourg“. Verschiedene Funktionen hatte er gehabt: Als Kunstausstellungen hatte er gedient, als Waffenmanufaktur, als Gefängnis für Danton, Desmoulin und David … Seit 1834 ließ ihn die Regierung erweitern, ein Parlamentsaal wurde angebaut, auch eine Bibliothek. Deren zentrale Kuppel malte Delacroix seit 1845 aus. In jenem Gemälde kommen George Sand und Chopin als Personen vor: Delacroix hatte hier Chopin als Dante verewigt, George Sand wurde als Aspasia, der zweiten Frau des Perikles, dargestellt.

Die Besonderheit jener Verkörperung kann insbesondere vor jenem Hintergrund verstanden werden, dass Marie d’Agoult sich sehr geärgert haben muß, hatte sie selbst Franz Liszt als Dante gesehen, und zwar zu jener Zeit, als sie und Liszt noch ein Paar waren … Jenen verewigten Rang nahm nun mit spielerischer Leichtigkeit Frédéric Chopin ein …

Seit Sommer 1845 leidet Chopin an einer Krankheit, die er als bereits überwunden zu haben glaubte, nun aber zu einem echten Schmerz heranwächst und fortan wesentlich sein künstlerisches Schaffen wesentlich beeinflusst, nämlich dem Heimweh. Ausgelöst wurde jene Krankheit insbesondere durch einen Besuch Ende Mai/Anfang Juni von George Sand und Chopin einer Veranstaltung in der Salle Valentino in der Rue Saint-Honoré, wo die Bilder des Amerikaners George Catlin, einen m fünfzigjährigen Juristen, der seit langem nur noch für die Rechte der Indianer kämpfte und deren Leben in Zeichnungen, Aquarellen, Stichen und schriftlichen Aufzeichnungen dokumentierte. Chopin bewegte hier vor allem das Schicksal einer der jungen Indianerinnen, dass er seiner Familie in Polen ausführlich davon berichtete. Nicht DASS sie gestorben, sondern WORAN sie gestorben war, beschäftigt ihn. Die Frau von einem, der Kleiner Wolf hieß, sie hieß Oke-we-mi … Die Bärin die auf dem Rücken einer anderen marschiert, ist an Heimweg gestorben (das arme Geschöpf) -, und auf dem Friedhof Montmartre (dort wo auch Jas begraben liegt) setzt man ihr ein Denkmal. Vor dem Tod hat man sie getauft, das Begräbnis fand in der Madelaine statt, so Chopin an seine Familie. Sogar das geplante Denkmal schildert Chopin genau im Schreiben an seine Familie. Der offiziellen Nachricht zufolge war die Indianerin zwar an Schwindsucht gestorben. Sind die Grenzen – oder auch Übergänge – zwischen Heimweh und Schwindsucht für Chopin nicht etwa fließend? Jas, sein polnischer Freund, starb in der Fremde an Schwindsucht, und auch Carl Filtsch, Chopins genialster Schüler, aus Siebenbürgen stammend, ist fern seiner Heimat an derselben Krankheit gestorben. Consomption, Verzehrtwerden, Auszehren, sind die Symptome. „Verzehrt“ sich auch auch Chopin in seinem Wehmut an das Ferne, Verlorene? Werden seine Kräfte für die Gegenwart durch die Trauer um das Verlorene aufgefressen? Chopin selbst weiß um seine Situation und schreibt seiner Familie: Ich bin immer mit einem Fuß bei Euch, mit einem anderen bei der Herrin des Hauses, die im Nebenzimmer arbeitet. Klar, wer Heimweh leidet, lebt nie ganz im Hier und Jetzt, sondern zu einem wesentlichen und bestimmenden Teil im Dort und Damals, in espace simaginaires, wie Chopin selbst dies nannte.

Dass Chopins Totenfeier in der Madelaine stattfinden sollte, geht im Wesentlichen auf jene Assoziation mit der an Heimweh gestorbenen Indianerin zurück, deren Totenfeier ebenfalls hier abgehalten wurde.

Chopins Werk ist inspiriert von jenem Weltschmerz, die seine Kompositionen in einer ganz besonderen Form von Sehnsucht bestimmen. Erfüllung und Erlösung fand er erst im Tod. Ich bin jetzt an der Quelle des Glücks, waren seine letzten Worte …

Zentral für Ihren Klang wird selbstverständlich wohl auch Ihre synästhetische Wahrnehmung sein, die Sie bereits ansprachen. Als Synästhesie wird ja die Kopplung eigentlich getrennter Bereiche der menschlichen Psyche bezeichnet, meist in Form der Verbindung von zwei Sinnen. Am bekanntesten ist wohl die Form der Verbindung zwischen opischen und akustischen Phänomenen, sprich das „Hören von Farben“ zu bestimmten Tönen. Welche Ausformung hat Ihre Synästhesie beziehungsweise (da in den meisten Fällen mehrere parallel vorliegen) haben Ihre Synästhesien? Sehen Sie auch Farben beim Erklingen von Musik, gibt es dabei Besonderheiten wie unechte Farben (manche sehen anscheinend Farben, die es in der Natur auf diese Art nicht gibt) und haben Sie auch sonstige unwillkürlichen Sinnesverknüpfungen, die musikbezogen sind? Wie beeinflusst die Synästhesie Ihren Sinn für Klang und Wirkung, also auch Ihren Anschlag?

Für mich besteht die gesamte Musik und jeder einzelne Ton aus vielen einzelnen Farben. „Unechte“ Farben gibt es dabei nicht, zwar allemöglichen Mischformen, diese beruhen aber – wie allemöglichen Klänge – auf der Basis und dem Verhältnis reeller Farben. So, wie ich Musik primär unter „harmonischer Artikulation“ empfinde (das heißt, bei entsprechenden Klängen habe ich ‚Gänsehaut‘), so sind es auch „harmonische Farben“, die mich in „Einklang“ mit der subjektiven Richtigkeit einer Interpretation und eines Klanges bringen. Selbstverständlich steht dies alles in direktem Zusammenhang mit dem »Anschlag« und dem damit hervorzubringenden »Klang«. Daher resultiert ja auch mein ungeheurer Anspruch an die Instrumente bzw. Techniker: Exakte Vorstellung eines Tones - Klang - Instrument - Interpretation - Werk(vollendung) - Wahrheit bilden schließlich eine untrennbare Einheit beziehungsweise ein »Gesamtkunstwerk«. Jeder Faktor baut auf den anderen auf beziehungsweise ist von ihm abhängig. Endet schließlich alles in einer »Katharsis«, so ist es ein großes Glück …

Des öfteren hörte ich davon, man könne die Synästhesie kurzzeitig „überlisten“ durch eine Art Überflutung an parallelen Höreindrücken, so beispielsweise durch eine rasche, freie Akkordfolge, wie bei Prokofieff häufig zu finden, oder eine Clustermusik wie bei Ligeti. Was sehen Sie bei solch einer diffizilen Musik? Entscheidet so auch die Synästhesie über Ihren Musikgeschmack und entsprechend Ihre Programmwahl?

»Synästhesie« ist niemals „überlistbar“ beziehungsweise „trügbar“. Es ist eine emotionale Wahrnehmung, die durch keinerlei Programmwahl oder Musikgeschmack beeinflusst werden kann. Ob man Chopin in der Interpretation von Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli oder einen Song dargestellt von Helene Fischer wahrnimmt, erlebt und erfährt: Sicher, nicht zu vergleichende Extreme, aber dennoch Gefühlswelten, die letztendlich ähnlich sein können. Ob Atonalität oder Clustermusik: Die Frage ist, ob Ihr Inneres eine neue Definierung erfährt oder nicht.

Nun möchte ich noch auf die Programmauswahl Ihrer neuen Tripel-CD „Chronological Chopin“ eingehen. Darauf befinden sich alle Balladen und Scherzi, die 24 Préludes, die Fantasie f-Moll, die Berceuse Des-Dur, die Barcarolle Fis-Dur sowie die Polonaise-Fantasie As-Dur. Aus welchen Gründen fiel Ihre Wahl gerade auf diese Stücke? Was sprach beispielsweise gegen die Aufnahme einiger bekannter Einzelstücke aus den Walzern, Nocturnes, Mazurken oder von berühmten anderen Werken wie dem Fantasie Impromptu Op. 66 oder Andante spianato und Grande Polonaise op. 24?

Auf den drei Platten sind die Werke chronologisch aufgereiht, doch ist sich ja schon lange die Kritik einig darüber, Chopin habe wenig Entwicklung durchlebt und Sie nannten sein Spiel von Anfang an einen „Glücksgriff“, der keine Herumirren nötig hatte. Wieso dann diese zeitlich geordnete Aufstellung?


Mit dieser Edition ist meine „Chopin-Orientierung/Beschäftigung“ noch lange nicht abgeschlossen. Eine nächste Einspielung wird sich insbesondere mit den »Drei Sonaten« beschäftigen – und auch die von Ihnen angesprochenen Werke einschließen.

Vor allem die Mazurken bedürfen einer eigenen Beschäftigung und Darstellung: Mit keiner anderen Form als dieser hat sich Chopin länger auseinandergesetzt und beschäftigt als mit dieser, keine andere Form ist ein längeres Spiegelbild der lebenslangen kompositorischen Beschäftigung als dasjenige der Mazurken, dem Spiegelbild der Reminiszens an seine polnische Heimat.

Die vorliegende Edition beschäftigt sich mit den außerordentlichen Werken Chopins. Werke, an denen er – wie in anderen Darlegungen bereits beschrieben – immer wieder und viele Jahre gearbeitet hatte. Ob Chopin wenig Entwicklung durchlebt hat, möchte ich bezweifeln, im Gegenteil – auch dies habe ich in meinem Booklet-Text bereits eingehend dargelegt. Sicherlich, ein „Glücksfall“: Ferruccio Busoni, in seinem Vorwort zu Bachs Wohltemperiertem Klavier, 1894: „Chopins hochgeniale Begabung rang sich durch den Sumpf weichlich-melodiöser Phrasenhaftigkeit und klangblendenden Virtuosentums zur ausgeprägten Individualität empor. In harmonischer Intelligenz rückt er dem mächtigen Sebastian [Bach] um eine gute Spanne näher.“

Und seinen Zürcher Programmen, 1916, ist zu entnehmen: „Chopins Persönlichkeit repräsentiert das Ideal der Balzacschen Romanfigur der 30er-Jahre: des blassen, interessanten, mysteriösen, vornehmen Fremden in Paris. Durch das Zusammentreffen dieser Bedingungen erklärt sich die durchschlagende Wirkung von Chopins Erscheinung, der eine starke Musikalität das Beständige verleiht.“

Die Werke Ihrer Einspielung nennen Sie die außerordentlichen Werke, an denen Chopin besonders lange arbeitete. Wie genau habe ich das Wort „außerordentlich“ zu verstehen, was hebt dieses Programm von sämtlichen anderen Stücken ab, was macht sie so außerordentlich?

Über die Kompositionsweise Chopins ist ja einiges bekannt, besonders sein minutiöses Feilen an jeder noch so unscheinbaren Note, so dass das Resultat zeitgleich improvisatorisch wie auch letztgültig in die Form gepasst erscheint. Haben Sie über diesen Vorgang noch näheres Wissen, Details oder unbekanntere Erkenntnisse, die Sie mit uns teilen könnten?


Es steht außer Frage, dass pianistisch wie auch in der kompositorischen Anlage die Vier Balladen die Krönung des Chopin’schen Schaffens bilden. Ausgehend vom Opus 23, der ersten Ballade, bishin zur vierten, dem Opus 52, erstrecken sich diese Tongedichte in ihrer Entstehung über einen Zeitraum von elf Jahren (1831–1842) und sind somit ein Spiegel hinsichtlich der Art und Weise bezüglich der Vereinigung von poetischer Ausdruckskraft mit meisterlicher, großformatiger Gestaltung sowie pianistischer Fülle. In ihrer musikalischen Aussage sind sie jeweils eine Welt für sich, wobei jede Spekulation, ob diese Werke denn durch literarische Vorlagen des polnischen Schriftstellers Mickiewicz inspiriert wurden oder nicht, sich erübrigt. Bestimmend für den gesamten Stimmungsgehalt sind nämlich die zwingenden Übergänge der jeweiligen Episoden untereinander, die in ihrer frappierend starken und überzeugenden Wirkung Betrachtungen der eigenwilligen formalen Anlage schon beinahe vergessen lassen. Während die zweite Ballade in ihrem drastisch-dramatischen Wechsel der Passagen von idyllisch-pastoraler Beschaulichkeit und plötzlich hereinbrechendem Sturm vorüberzieht, faszinieren die anderen Balladen mit ihren sanften und gleitenden Übergängen und verleihen den Werken somit eine einzigartige Organik.

Aber auch die anderen Werke zeichnen sich durch eine bislang nicht dagewesene „Dichtigkeit“ in der kompositorischen Anlage aus.

Die Musikgeschichte kennt die Gattung und Form des Scherzos seit Langem. Beethoven hatte in seinen Sonaten, Symphonien und in seiner Kammermusik bereits mehrmals das Scherzo an Stelle des bis dahin üblichen Menuetts gesetzt; und auch Schubert betitelte einige seiner kleineren Stücke mit »Scherzo«, ebenso Mendelssohn (beispielsweise op. 16 und op. 21). Chopin übernahm diesen Begriff, gestaltete ihn in Form und Struktur aber frei nach seiner Intuition. In seinen Scherzi könnte man vielleicht sein Bestreben erkennen, die herkömmliche Anlage der Sonate aufzulösen und einzelne Teile daraus zu verselbständigen.

Die anderen Werke rücken beinahe schon in Bereiche der sogenannten „Absoluten Musik“. Die „Abgrenzung“ hierbei liegt darin, dass insbesondere die Balladen literarisch inspiriert sind, wohingegen Berceuse, Barcarolle und Polonaise-Fantaisie, um nur einmal drei zu nennen, keine literarischen Vorlagen haben und als wirkliche Monolithen dastehen.

Als ein Kabinettstück von nirgends sonst erreichter Delikatesse des Klangs gilt beispielsweise die Berceuse Des-Dur op. 57. Bewundernswert der geniale Einfall, wie sich über einer ostinaten Bassfigur, einer Chaconne vergleichbar, Akkordbrechungen, Fiorituren, Arabesken, Triller und kaskadenartige Passagen als Variationen aufbauen und entwickeln, die sich aus anfänglich träumerischer Ruhe in immer schnellerer Koloratur und brillantem Schillern zu einem virtuosen Mittelteil steigern, um dann wieder zu jener visionären Ruhe zurückzufinden, wenn der Achtelrhythmus mit der wiegenden Figur der linken Hand verschmilzt.

Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik schrieb am 16. September 1845: „Die linke Hand beginnt mit einer einfachen, wiegenden zwischen Tonica und Dominante abwechselnden Begleitungsfigur. Im 3ten Tacte setzt die rechte ein mit einer schwebenden Melodie, wie sie wohl eine Mutter, die, selbst halb wachend, halb träumend, ihren Liebling in den Schlaf lullt, vor sich hinschlummern mag. Eine zweite Stimme gesellt sich bald hinzu; und während die Linke wiegend fortfährt, variirt die Rechte das Schlaflied auf mannigfache, träumerisch spielende Weise. Die letzte graziöse und schmiegsame Veränderung zieht sich aus der Höhe, mehr nach der Mitte der Klaviatur. Allmäßig verstummt das zarte Lied. – Wohl selig mag das Kindlein träumen!“

Von sublimer Schönheit geprägt ist die Barcarolle op. 60. In ihrer Ausdrucksskala, ihrer fluoreszierenden Farbenpracht, dem wiegenden Rhythmus wie auch ihrer vollendeten formalen Gestaltung ist sie eines von Chopins Meisterwerken. Carl Tausig über die Barcarolle: »Hier handelt es sich um zwei Personen, um eine Liebesszene in einer verschwiegenen Gondel; sagen wir, diese Inszenierung ist Symbol einer Liebesbegegnung überhaupt. Das ist ausgedrückt in den Terzen und Sexten; der Dualismus von zwei Noten (Personen) ist durchgehend; alles ist zweistimmig oder zweiseelig. In dieser Modulation in Cis-Dur (dolce sfogato) nun, da ist Kuß und Umarmung! Das liegt auf der Hand! – wenn nach 3 Takten Einleitung im vierten dieses im Baß-Solo leicht schaukelnde Thema eintritt, dieses Thema dennoch nur als Begleitung durch das ganze Gewebe verwandt wird, auf diesem die Cantilene in zwei Stimmen zu liegen kommt, so haben wir damit ein fortgesetztes, zärtliches Zwiegespräch.«

Die Allgemeine Musikalische Zeitung begeisterte sich am 17. Februar 1847: „Die schaukelnde Bewegung der Barcarole lässt sich zwar nur durch ein zweitheiliges Maass, das den Schlag und Widerschlag der Wellen auszudrücken vermag, repräsentiren, jedoch erhöht es den Charakter, wenn die einzelnen Tactglieder in dreitheiligem Rhythmus, also in Triolen gehalten sind. Am Ruhigsten gleitet das Ganze aber dahin, wenn der Zwölfachteltakt den doppelten Schlag und Widerschlag ausdrückt, und besonders bei grösserer und ausgedehnterer Form des ganzen Musikstückes ist dies ein treffliches Mittel, um die Tactgruppen zu stetigem Flusse zu verbinden. Den Rhythmus, von dem das Gepräge des Ganzen abhängt, lässt Chopin zuerst als Begleitungsfigur, wie wir sie in vielen seiner Etuden finden, auftreten, und baut auf dieselbe die zweistimmige Melodie, so dass man sich die Wasserfahrt irgend eines zufriedenen und glücklichen Paares dabei wohl denken kann. In diesem ganz behaglichen Zustande belässt der Componist die Sache nicht, sondern zieht Wendungen, die der Barcarole fern liegen, herein, lässt endlich ein durch Rhythmus und Tonart scharf abstechendes Alternativ Platz greifen. Das Stück steht in Fis dur, dieses nun in A; natürlich leitet sich dies nach Fis, und damit auch in die eigentliche Barcarole wieder zurück. Doch hat sie eine neue Gestalt gewonnen. Sie wird durch Verdoppelung der Intervalle, durch mancherlei Passagenwesen ein Salonstück, das seinem ursprünglichen Wesen untreu erscheint, wenn es auch, gut, vor allen Dingen rein gespielt, recht schön klingt. Dieses wirklich und gewissenhafte rein und sauber Spielen wird durch die zahlreichen Vorzeichnungen, die Chopin, weil er so gern auf den Obertasten spielt, so häufig anzuwenden genöthigt ist, vielen Dilettanten erschwert. Zugleich aber ist dies eine nicht zu verachtende Uebung.“

Die Polonaise-Fantaisie op. 61 ist Chopins letztes großes Klavierwerk. Im Grunde kann sie nicht zu den Polonaisen im eigentlichen Sinn gezählt werden. Vielmehr ist sie eine Fantasie, deren eigenwillige Form einer symphonischen Dichtung beziehungsweise symphonischen Großanlage entspricht. Ihr musikalisch-programmatischer Gehalt ist eher balladesk als tänzerisch. Überhaupt, als Spätwerk von Chopin, ist hier die Frage statthaft, ob denn die durchgehaltene Stimmung innerer Beschaulichkeit durch Koketterien gestört werden sollte. Der einkomponierte Maestoso-Charakter (so auch die Tempobezeichnung »Allegro-Maestoso«) ist bestimmend für die Stimmung des gesamten Werkes und bedingt etwas »tragend-ebenmäßig-schwereloses«. Als Hauptrepräsentant gehört sie zu den letzten Werken Chopins, welche von fieberhafter Unruhe geprägt und keineswegs kühne und lichtvolle Bilder zu finden sind.

Franz Liszts poetische Darstellung mutet uns heute, vor allem im Zusammenhang mit seinen eigenen Werken, seltsam an: »Es sind dies Bilder, die der Kunst wenig günstig sind, wie die Schilderung aller extremen Momente, der Agonie, wo die Muskeln jede Spannkraft verlieren und die Nerven, nicht mehr Werkzeuge des Willens, den Menschen zur passiven Beute des Schmerzes werden lassen. Ein beklagenswerter Anblick fürwahr, den der Künstler nur mit äußerster Vorsicht aufnehmen sollte in seinen Bereich.«

Bewegende Worte, sicherlich, wobei ich glaube, dass Liszt mit der formalen Anlage dieses Werkes in Konflikt geriet, möglicherweise auf ähnliche Art und Weise, wie seinerzeit Eduard Hanslick die h-moll-Sonate von Franz Liszt mit derben Worten als »immer leerlaufende Genialitätsdampfmühle« aburteilte.

Daher bleibt für den Interpreten die große gestalterische Aufgabe an diesem Werk: Überzeugende, ebenmäßige Organik im gesamten Ablauf, mit Blick auf das Große, der Gefahr trotzend, sich auf die beschränkte Ausführung der wundervoll hinreißenden Einzelheiten zu verlieren.

Über sie schrieb die Allgemeine Musikalische Zeitung am 17. Februar 1847: „Ganz frei, rhapsodisch und gleichsam nur präludirend beginnt der Componist, geht dann in vagen Harmonieen in das Maass eines Alla Pollacca über, und lässt dann ein Tempo giusto (As dur) eintreten, das einen thematischen Charakter bat. Wir brauchen diesen Ausdruck, um anzudeuten, dass zu einem eigentlichen Polonaisenthema im gewöhnlichen Sinne es doch nicht kommt, so frei und phantastisch ist auch dieses zur witeren Entwickelung bestimmte Thema beschaffen. Von einer strengeren Durchführung ist auch nicht die Rede. Eine zweite Melodie in der Dominante ist schärfer begränzt, cantabler, und um so wohthätiger, als bis hieher schon sehr viel modulirt worden ist. Nun aber beginnt erst die Fantasie herumzuschweifen, aus Es geht es weiter nach B, nach G moll und H moll und nun in einen selbständigen Satz H dur, der durch ähnliche rhapsodische Figuren als im Anfange sich nach F moll und dann wieder in die Grundtonart As zurückwirft. Diese wird eigentlich erst zuletzt dauernd und planvoll festgehalten. Das ganze Stück schillert in einer gewissen Unbestimmtheit der Tonarten, die freilich bei Chopin so oft ihre Reize hat, doch aber diesmal sehr weit geht. Der Name Fantasie ist wohl eben mit Rücksicht auf die Kühnheit dieser Conturen gewählt. Die Theorie fragt hier nach den Gränzen solcher Freiheit, über der sehr leicht die Wirkung des Ganzen verloren gehen kann. Mancher wird nach zwei Seiten diese Polonaise muthlos weglegen. Bei genauerem Verweilen wird manche Einzelnheit freilich Genuss verschaffen, indessen können wir nicht umhin, zu bemerken, dass Chopin, gerade in seiner blühendsten Kraft, es auch am Meisten verstand, seine Erfindung zu beschränken, zu zügeln. Vermöchte er noch dies über sich gewinnen, so würde er durch seine oft so merkwürdigen Combinationen allgemeineren und stärkeren Eindruck erreichen. Der Gedanke, den er hinwirft, ist fast immer glücklich, warum verschmäht er nun so sehr seine feste Gestaltung, besonnene Entwickelung?“

Gerne möchte ich noch eine recht persönliche Frage zu Ihrem Spiel stellen. Wenn Sie spielen, Chopin oder andere Komponisten, wie sehen Sie „Ihre Rolle“ in der Darbietung? Steht für Sie nur das Werk im Vordergrund und versuchen Sie, sich rein als Vermittler möglichst weitgehend auszuschalten, oder beziehen Sie aktiv Ihre Persönlichkeit und Ihre subjektive Wahrnehmung mit in den Moment ein?

Ich sehe generell die Funktion eines Interpreten in der Rolle eines „Dieners am Kunstwerk“. Die großen Komponisten haben ihre Texte so eindeutig verfasst und dargelegt, dass deren Intention und Aussage unverwechselbar ist. Diese hervorzubringen, ist primär die Aufgabe eines Interpreten. Dabei ist es die große Kunst, hinter dieser Aufgabe zurückzutreten, und dennoch seine eigene Persönlichkeit als Identität miteinzubringen, ohne die einkomponierte Aussage der Komposition zu verfälschen. Wenn wir uns die Geschichte der großen Interpreten ansehen, können wir erfahren, dass exakt darin die große Kunst bestand, eben dass Interpret und Komposition zu einer großen allumfassenden Einheit verschmolzen. Schon nach wenigen Tönen war jeder Interpret mit seiner ureigenen Persönlichkeit, quasi als Visitenkarte, erkennbar. Und dennoch blieb die Aussage einer Komposition unverfälscht erkennbar. „Subjektive Wahrnehmung“ blieb als inspiratives Element für den letzten Moment der Erfahrung als „Erlebnis“ reserviert. Hierbei entstand für den Zuhörer die Situation einer „Katharsis“. Er, der Zuhörer, erfuhr, dass Musik und deren Interpretation letzten Endes eine „Sprache“ waren. Subjektivität und Objektivität bildeten eine neue Ebene der Erfahrung. An anderer Stelle habe ich bereits gesagt, dass „Bedeutung des Moments“ und „Forderung der Sache“ zu einer einzigen Komponente der Gratwanderung entwuchsen. Darin sehe ich auch meine Funktion als Vermittlung und Hervorbringung des Aspektes einer „Wahrheit“.

In Thomas Manns Alterswerk »Doktor Faustus«, „jener an das alte Deutsche Volksbuch vom Teufelsbeschwörer Dr. Faustus sich anlehnenden Künstlerbiographie, in welcher das Schicksal der Musik als Paradigma der Krisis der Kunst selbst, der Kultur überhaupt, behandelt ist …“ – so die Worte des Autors – steht im Mittelpunkt die Romanfigur Adrian Leverkühn und seine in syphilistischer Ekstase entstandenen atonalen Kompositionen als Beispiele notwendig gewordenen dodekaphonischen Denkens. Dabei wird auf geradezu bewegende Art und Weise dessen exemplarische Kunst mit der Sichtweise des deutschen Philosophen Arthur Schopenhauer in Verbindung gebracht, dessen Idealvorstellung einer nach berückender Versinnlichung strebenden Interpretation im Sinne von Wahrheit darin bestand, das ureigenste Anliegen großer Musik darin verwirklicht zu sehen, deren Wesen im Jenseits des Gemüts und der Sinne zu vernehmen und anzuschauen.

Was Schopenhauer damit meinte, bezog sich letztlich auf eine »Allumfassenheit«, einer Ebene gleichend, auf der die Ausleuchtung verschiedenster Parameter in Werk und Interpretation allen Anforderungen standhielt. Einen Prozess »historischer Kreation« nannte er dies.

Gestatten wir uns hier eine Reflexion über die Bedeutung und den Grund des Wandels der Interpretation großer Kunstwerke und vor allem des (fälschlicherweise) immer mehr in den Hintergrund gedrängten Phänomens der »Emotion«:

Wenn große und zu Recht berühmte – mittlerweile leider nicht mehr unter uns weilende – Interpreten im Konzert ihre Ansichten mitteilten, erfuhren wir Musik als das, was sie eigentlich war: SPRACHE. Sprache in der Auslotung von Details, in der Hervorkehrung und Deutung einkomponierter Reibungen und Schroffheiten, quasi als Spiegelbilder in der Entstehung ihrer jeweiligen Zeit, widerspiegelt an der eigenen Identität, dem intuitiven Wissen um große Zusammenhänge und der Persönlichkeit des Künstlers. So entwuchs ein Kunstwerk, dessen Aussage stets einzigartig, charismatisch, authentisch, aber auch – im positiven Sinne – nicht wiederholbar war, einem einzigen großen Wurf gleichend, eigenwillig – bisweilen eigensinnig – jedoch stets die Balance wahrend zwischen Bedeutung des Moments und Forderung der Sache, ein Spannungsgefühl, das bisweilen ein neues Schönheitsideal entstehen ließ. Interpretation nicht aus klassisch-plakativer Draufsicht, sondern als ein sich unerbittlich dynamisch entrollender Prozess. Ein solcher Reifungsprozess setzt jedoch eine Entwicklung im ureigensten Sinne voraus, eine Entwicklung, die Zeit benötigt, Zeit, um zu einer „eigenen Spache“ zu gelangen.

In einem renommierten deutschen Musikmagazin hatte ich mich vor vielen Jahren in einem Interview der Frage zu stellen, was ich jungen Pianisten empfehle, um eine eigene Identität zu finden. Ich antwortete, dass ich große Probleme und direkt eine große Gefahr für die Kunst in der Schnelllebigkeit unserer heutigen Zeit sehe. Jungen Pianisten bleibt oft nicht die Zeit der Rückbesinnung und Ruhe für einen inneren Reifungsprozess. Bereits in der Schule setzt sehr schnell eine Spezialisierung ein (Kollegstufe), die eine eigentliche Ausweitung einer Allgemeinbildung verhindert. Diese Entwicklung stelle ich in Frage.

Dann sehe ich das Problem der internationalen Wettbewerbe, bei denen es allesamt um den Wettlauf um das schnellste und lauteste Spiel; anstelle um die Musik an sich und deren Hervorbringung geht.

Auch die Wahl eines entsprechenden Lehrers ist von höchster Wichtigkeit: Ich lehne entschieden bestimmte Talentschmieden ab, die quasi guruhaft ihre Schüler auf die vorderen Plätzen der Wettbewerbe platzieren anstelle den tiefergehenden Gehalt der Kunst zu lehren.

Ich wünsche jungen Pianisten die Kraft, dieser Maschinerie zu widerstehen und die Fähigkeit, in sich selbst hineinzuhören: Wenn sich Begabung und Talent, Fleiß und härteste Arbeit, Intelligenz und die entsprechende Ausweitung einer allumfassenden Bildung die Waage halten, dann ist die Voraussetzung für die Schaffung und Entwicklung einer eigenständigen Persönlichkeit geschaffen.

Zu dieser Entfaltung ist eine heutzutage leider immer mehr in den Hintergrund tretende Eigenschaft notwendig: Mut. Mut, sich nicht zeitlich-kurzlebenden Strömungen zu unterwerfen oder gar unterwerfen zu lassen, Mut zur Unabhängigkeit, Mut, eigene Konzepte zu entwickeln und dahinter zu stehen. Mut zur Eigenständigkeit; Mut, sich vom Trend der Anpassung zu lösen.

Und überdies steht für mich die Bewahrung einer Natürlichkeit und menschlichen Einfachheit in Form menschlicher Größe an zentraler Stelle: Wenn die Blickrichtung über alle intellektuellen Bezüge hinaus geht, droht die Gefahr, den Blickwinkel zum Inneren, womit ich diesbezüglich das normale Leben meine, zu verlieren: Große Kunst wurde nämlich aus dem Leben, dessen Menschlichkeit , dessen Einfachheit und auch dessen Niederungen geboren. Arroganz ist hier fehl am Platz.

Interpretation als ein Aspekt humaner Wirklichkeit also, womit der Kreis der Intuition geschlossen wäre.

Ich selbst bekenne mich zu meinem künstlerischen Credo, der Ästhetik des deutschen Philosophen Hegel entstammend, welche nicht nur Überzeugung, sondern quasi Verpflichtung meines eigenen künstlerischen Wollens, Denkens und Wirkens ist: „Denn in der Kunst haben wir es mit keinem bloß angenehmen oder nützlichen Spielwerk, sondern … mit einer Entfaltung der Wahrheit zu tun.“

Sich entführen zu lassen in die inneren Bezirke großer Musik und Musik als Offen-Legung zu begreifen, vor allem auch in Kenntnis der Abgrenzung gegenüber kurzweiliger, vordergründiger Effekthascherei, dies dürfte die Aufgabe und Verpflichtung von Interpret, Hörer, Konzertagenten, Veranstaltern, Musikkritikern und insbesondere der Schallplattenindustrie, welche zum Erhalt von Kulturgut beiträgt, für die nächsten Jahre sein.

Interview geführt von: Oliver Fraenzke, Dezember 2015
Alle Antworttexte: © Burkard Schliessmann, 2015
Burkard Schliessmann: Chronological Chopin
divine art, DDC 25752
EAN: 8 09730 57522 8


Original unter: 'The New Listener'

Go to Top




Talking Bach with Pianist Burkard Schliessmann
By Jerry Dubins - FANFARE-Magazin, (pre)-released December 17, 2014; March/April 2015  

Burkard Schliessmann is a fascinating man. A true polymath, he has a deep understanding of music, the arts, science, religion, and history, and a keen grasp on the complex body of interdisciplinary studies that connects them in ways both obvious and obscure. Chatting with him—or more properly, I should say, listening to him expound on Bach, which seems to be his favorite topic—is an engaging and engrossing experience.

But the interests of this extraordinarily gifted and diversified German-born artist are wide-ranging. As a professional scuba diver, he serves as an ambassador for the “Protecting of Our Ocean Planet” program of the Project AWARE Foundation, projectaware.org; and as a student of nature he has become quite an accomplished photographer.

Graduating with a Master’s degree from Frankfurt’s University of Music and Performing Arts, Schliessmann studied in his youth under one of the last students of the legendary Helmut Walcha, and later participated in master classes conducted by Shura Cherkassky and Bruno Leonardo Gelber. By age 21, Schliessmann had committed to memory and played the complete organ works of Bach; and to this day, Bach remains Schliessmann’s greatest passion, though he waxes almost as passionate on Chopin and Schumann.

Burkard has been interviewed three times before in Fanfare, the first time by Peter Rabinowitz in 27:4 in a conversation that centered largely on the pianist’s Chopin and Schumann albums for Bayer Records. In a second interview, this time, with James Reel in 31:3, Burkard spoke at length about his approach to Bach’s Goldberg Variations on his then new SACD, also for Bayer. And in yet a third interview, in 33:5, titled “Cannons Camouflaged by Flowers,” again with Rabinowitz as in the first interview, Schliessmann spoke of his Chopin-Schumann Anniversary Edition 2010.

For this fourth interview, once again, the topic is mainly Bach, for Burkard has just released a brand new SACD album, this time on the Divine Art label, containing a program of Bach’s keyboard works.

Burkard, let me begin here: You mention early study with a student of the great Helmut Walcha. For as long as I can remember, I’ve had Walcha’s recordings of almost all of Bach’s harpsichord works in my collection on EMI Japanese import discs, and on the Arkiv label I have Walcha’s The Art of Fugue. I mention this because we have a Hall of Fame section in the magazine to which we submit past recordings, reviewed or not, that we believe have special merit and deserve special recognition. Walcha’s The Art of Fugue was one of my Hall of Fame picks, one of only two or three I’ve submitted in my 12 years with Fanfare. Tell me why you think Walcha’s Bach is special and how it has influenced your own interpretations.

Already by the age of 21, I played the complete organ works of Bach—and this by memory. As a child and youngster, I had been taught by one of the last master-students of the legendary Helmut Walcha, and I had been completely affected by this style of insight into Bach and the internal structures of the works. This method of regarding the independent coherence of all the voices gave me a special comprehension of Bach and his philosophy.

Lastly, one can say that I have been growing up with Bach, even to this day. If you understand the free organ works (preludes, toccatas, fugues), the chorales, and especially the trio sonatas, you have an insight into Bach that others don’t have. In particular, the soloistic and independent leadings of the three voices of the trio sonatas is artistically the major aim of an organist; and already the Orgelbüchlein (Part 5 of the Peters Edition) shows Bach in all his structural and emotional effects.

Albert Schweitzer described the Orgelbüchlein as something where the tonal speech of Bach is unbeatable. The comprehension of Bach’s organ music means an understanding of its counterpoint and polyphonic structures, and of the coherence of Bach himself as both a composer and a man. Indeed, Walcha’s interpretation of The Art of Fugue is a touchstone in the history of the interpretation of this work, unique in his overwhelming clarity and insights into the polyphonic structures, but also as a result of an aspect, which I personally call—also in view to my own and personal approach to Bach— the aspect of human reality. Very Classical in strength of speed and architectural proportions, Walcha pointed out the polyphonic structures in an enlightened but moreover especially humanistic way, in a much smoother and more elegant way than Glenn Gould on the piano. But I believe this result is also connected to a conviction of Walcha himself, who believed in the truth of several parameters: truth of sound, truth of interpretation, and truth of instrument. The Grand Organ of the St. Laurenskeerk in Alkmaar and the acoustic possibilities of this hall were just right to merge all of these artistic ideals into one big culmination and synthesis. Indeed, Walcha’s interpretation of The Art of Fugue also would be my choice for the Hall of Fame.

In very different ways and for different reasons, Glenn Gould’s Bach has perhaps been even more influential than Walcha’s. Gould actually represents a dividing line between the old and the new in the approach to playing Bach. I don’t think there’s a keyboard player today, whether on harpsichord or piano, whose interpretive approach to Bach’s music has not been profoundly influenced by Gould. It’s as if there’s B.G. (Before Gould)—Wanda Landowska, Rosalyn Tureck, Eunice Norton, and Claudio Arrau—and A.G. (After Gould)—all those that followed. It’s like that comment Brahms made about how difficult it was to write a symphony with “the tramp of the giant” [Beethoven] behind him. In what ways and to what extent, if at all, do you feel your own interpretive approach has been influenced by Gould?

Well, I confess that I’m deeply impressed by the clarity of Gould. Pogorelich, I believe, once said in his early years that “before myself there only have been three outstanding pianists: Horowitz for his hyper-virtuosity, Michelangeli for his singular sound and touch, and Gould for his clarity....” But in my complete approach I’m not influenced by Glenn Gould, though that doesn’t mean I second-guess him. But one also has to realize that Gould had been at a very special and also sensitive point in time where he was forced to play Bach in this “radicalized” manner.

To approach Bach, one has to realize that 100 years after Bach’s death, Bach and his music had been totally forgotten. Even while he was still alive, Bach himself believed in the polyphonic power and the resulting symmetric architectures of well-proportioned music. But this had been an artificial truth—even for him. Other composers, including his sons, already composed in another style, where they found other ideals and brought new solutions to them.

The spirit of the time already had changed while Bach was still alive. Approximately 80 years later, it was Mendelssohn who discovered Bach anew with the performance of the St. Matthew Passion in 1829 in Berlin. Now a new renaissance began, and the world learned to know the greatness of Bach.

To become acquainted with Bach, many transcriptions were done. But the endeavors in rediscovering Bach had been—stylistically—in a wrong direction. Among these were the orchestral transcriptions of Leopold Stokowski, and the organ interpretations of the multi-talented Albert Schweitzer, who, one has to confess, had a decisive effect on the rediscovery of Bach. All performances had gone in the wrong direction: much too Romantic, with a false knowledge of historic style, the wrong sound, the wrong rubato, and so on.

The necessity of artists like Rosalyn Tureck and Glenn Gould—again more than 100 years later—has been understandable: Gould illustrated out in the 1950s the real clarity and internal explosions of the power-filled polyphony in the best way. This extreme style, called by many of his critics “refrigerator interpretations,” had been necessary to demonstrate the right strength to bring out the architecture in the right manner, which to a great extent had been lost before. I’m convinced that Gould’s approach was the right answer at that point in time. It’s possible that Gould would have played in another way if he’d have felt free to do so, but he seems to have felt duty-bound to go this uncompromising way because it was his interpretive and artistic responsibility.

I call this history and way of interpretation the “culture of interpretation.” The ranges of Bach interpretation had become wide, and there were the defenders of the historical style and those of the much more modern Romantic style. The performances of Bach‘s orchestral works and cantatas also had become extreme—on one side, for example, Karl Richter, who used a big and rich-toned orchestra; on the other side, Helmut Rilling, whose Bach is much more historically oriented. We still have to mention giants such as Wanda Landowska and Marie-Claire Alain, who were great influences on Bach interpretation, though not on me personally.

I, myself, represent the style of a Bach who was a human being with all his heights and depths, who knew life very well. My Bach is the experience of my playing the whole literature and filling the different voices with their own life, vitality, and vividness; it’s the independent speaking-until-singing of the different voices; and lastly it’s a balance between pianistic virtuosity and something chamber-music-like.

I had been fascinated by Gould’s explosive emotionality, which really is part of my own conception, even if today I have the possibility of another interpretation, as just explained; but there are two versions of the Well-Tempered Clavier that I also admire very much: those of Murray Perahia and Angela Hewitt. In the case of Hewitt, I wonder about the people she describes in interviews who come up to her and confess that they much prefer her first version of the Well-Tempered Clavier because they feel much more comfortable, safer, and free of risk with the “non-rubato” version, and they say they‘re afraid to follow the “new way. ” Personally, I think it’s worth a discussion whether it’s good or not to make a mixture and cross-over between Gould and Backhaus (what Hewitt does with her second version of the Well-Tempered Piano from 2008), but that’s between her and me. I also confess to be on the side of “risk.”

But to answer and clarify your question: No single interpretation has influenced me. Moreover, my interpretation is influenced by my knowing not only the whole Bach literature, but also by my knowing Bach the organist and his unlimited colors. It’s this richness, I hope, that I give to my listeners. It’s an all-embracing conception of life.

For your new album you’ve chosen some of Bach’s most popular and often-recorded keyboard “hits”—the Italian Concerto and the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue, for two. Now, I’m not going to ask you to argue the case for playing Bach on the piano as opposed to the harpsichord. That discussion was covered in your interview with James Reel. Besides, I don’t think there is much of an argument about it anymore. “It’s a done deal,” as they say. My take on the matter is that there was never much validity to the debate to begin with. First, Bach lived and worked at a time when it was accepted practice for one instrument to substitute for another when the originally scored-for instrument wasn’t available, and Bach himself transcribed his concertos for various instruments.

But second, and more importantly, I think, is that unlike his French contemporaries, François Couperin and Jean-Philippe Rameau, whose works for keyboard are of a descriptive, pièce caracteristiques nature, Bach’s keyboard, instrumental, and orchestral music is non-representational and essentially abstract. In fact, when you get into works such as the Goldberg Variations, The Art of Fugue, Book III of the Clavier-Übung (aka the German Organ Mass), A Musical Offering, and even a work like the Chaconne from the unaccompanied Violin Partita in D Minor, some would say the abstraction is based on number and mathematical intellection. This is why I believe Bach’s works transfer so well from one instrument to another—think of the violin chaconne on guitar or The Art of Fugue played by a string quartet. We don’t even know for sure what instrumentation was intended for The Art of Fugue. But my point is that because much of Bach’s music—especially that for keyboard—is non-figurative in nature, it’s not dependent on a specific instrument for the purpose of expression or to make its point. What are your thoughts on this?


Oh, that is a fascinating and challenging question. First, we’re of the same mind that Bach’s works have such a flexibility that they all have their own character and effect, even if they are performed on different instruments, independent of whether they are scored for a particular instrument or not. Here one can see the real genius of Bach. His music is independent of an epoch and modern for all times. For example, of course, no doubt, his organ works sound best (and also much more true to their original intent) if they are played on an adequate organ for Bach or Baroque music in general. But also, they develop their truth if you perform them on a modern or even Romantic instrument, such as a Sauer and Ladegast organ in Germany, or in the U.S. on the great Aeolian or Skinner organs.

Of course, it’s another language and character that speak here, but nevertheless in a fascinating manner—especially if the interpretation is flexible enough not to force the instrument to Bach, but more to leave the instrument to speak in its own way. On the other hand, for example, if you want to perform a major work by Max Reger, which is composed specifically for the possibilities of an organ by Sauer and Ladegast, you never will have the flexibility performing it on a typical Baroque organ, even though Reger himself is regarded as an epigone of Bach.

Let’s take your thoughts about the version of The Art of Fugue played by a string quartet. Again, I express the same opinion, because in this version—my favorite is the performance by the Emerson String Quartet on DG—the chamber music character of the music comes to the fore. In the four-voice reduction of a string quartet, you are aware of the polyphonic clarity and purity as in no other version.

As to the transcriptions and arrangements for others instruments by Bach himself, yes, from one and the same work we have different versions; it was the spirit of time to do it, a phenomenon which was also consistent with the parody method that was used by nearly all composers. But the reality—only few know this about the background of The Art of Fugue and the Musikalisches Opfer— is the reason these works are not scored for specific instruments. It has to do with the fact that Bach was a member of the Mizler’sche Societaet (Lorenz Christoph Mizler, 1711–1778, was a pupil of Bach and founded this circle), an elite group of individuals representing different areas of society, such as culture, industry, politics, and so on. For composers in the group, it was their task to demonstrate themselves regularly with new compositions, which had to be composed in a “theoretical” score, meaning not notated for any particular instruments. This is the background of the The Art of Fugue. Whether or not Bach wanted or preferred a specific instrumentation, to satisfy the Mizler’sche Societaet’s guidelines, he had to produce an open score that remained “speculative.”

Bach’s works are a bridge linking together far more remote areas of music, and allowing every later generation to understand the musical past. They were written at the end of a major period in the history of music, and while they are rooted in the past in terms of their form and spirit, their bold divinatory treatment of their musical material means that they also point the way forward and adumbrate a future age. Ever since Bach’s works were rediscovered by the Romantics in the early 19th century, their composer has been admired and hailed as the quintessential musician and as the incarnation of a supra-personal, timeless spirit in music.

It’s hard to put into words this special quality about his music, not least because it is sui generis, and because the distance from the self, or “I,” which it was almost impossible for the Romantics to grasp, was still a given for Bach as a result of the tradition in which he was working. He never spoke about himself or about his own sufferings and pleasures. His calling was sustained by a profound artistic and intuitive understanding of the nature of archetypal procedures in music and of the life and impact of the melodic line, which he had inherited from the age of Renaissance polyphony as one of the tools of his trade. With his unsurpassed ability to create the most vivid themes, Bach contrasted the older style with the newer Classical art, with its additional dimension of humanity. The mouthpiece of a higher power, he was the medium of religious revelation in his sacred works, the servant of social conventions in his secular suites, and the executor of musical developments and decisions in those “free” compositions that were not tied to a particular purpose, most notably the preludes and fugues of The Well-Tempered Clavier. In short, Bach’s incomparable greatness rests as much on his genius as on his position and function within the history of music.

Bach’s works are remarkable for the synergy arising from many different currents, a quality inspired by remote forms from the past, starting with vocal polyphony. The power associated with the independent melodic line, the primal power and impulse of all music-making continues unbroken in his music, filling his fugues with their uninterrupted thematic momentum. The architectural spirit of Gothic art is manifest in Bach’s forms, achieving a sense of fulfillment that seems like reminiscence. Such forms are like bold and fantastical buildings in the imaginary space of their sound world, thereby acquiring a genuine weightlessness and timelessness. The legacy of an age that was religious in its inspiration lies primarily in the unique contribution of the transcendental, which is achieved through mystic contemplation and ecstatic uplift.

Okay, I think we’ve probably spent enough time pondering philosophical issues. Let’s get direct our attention now to your latest SACD recording of five well-known Bach keyboard works—the Partita No. 2 in C Minor, BWV 826; the Italian Concerto, BWV 971; the Fantasia and Fugue in A Minor, BWV 904; the Fantasia [Adagio] and Fugue in C Minor, BWV 906; and the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue, BWV 903. Once again, your self-authored album note gives in-depth, detailed information about each of these works—so refreshing in an age where we’re lucky to get more than a track listing with many releases today—but I’d like to do a little probing and exploring of each of these pieces with you here and now.

The Partita No. 2, of course, is one of six such works Bach published as Part I of the Clavier-Übung. You mention that of the six partitas, No. 2 is the only one without a concluding gigue. But in its place, we have a zany, off-the-hinges Capriccio, which, it turns out, is my favorite movement in all of Bach’s partitas. A college professor I once had for a counterpoint class remarked that all the great composers had their ears screwed on backwards, and when I listen to this Capriccio, I know what he meant. There are some of the weirdest harmonies progressions, and dissonances in this movement, and in the second half of the binary form, Bach seems to vary the craziness by turning it upside down. Can you explain a bit more about what he’s up to here? To my ear, the whole thing is just so slapstick funny.

Yes, this Capriccio is also one of my favorites, and here Bach plays with the form of music and structure. What makes it so slapstick funny are the unique combinations and variety of motifs, themes, and their reversals, especially the 10ths jumps, and as you mention, the weirdest harmonies, which give the music a special mood. A better capriccio couldn’t be composed than this one by Bach.

Next up on your SACD is the Italian Concerto, which comprises the first half of the Clavier-Übung, Part II. I suppose if I wanted once again to make fun of Schumann commenting on Mendelssohn, I could say that Bach’s Italian Concerto paints a perfect musical portrait of the Scottish highlands. But seriously, what makes it Italian? And also, why do you suppose after publishing the Clavier-Übung, Part I, with its six quite substantial, multi-movement partitas, Bach published a second volume with only two, much shorter works, the Italian Concerto and the French Overture in B Minor, BWV 831?

That the Italian Concerto is Italian is mainly a matter of the form. The form of the solo concerto was established in Italy by Giuseppe Torelli, its purpose being to pit a single instrument, or solo, against a larger body of players, the tutti or ripieno. As a medium, it was then taken up and developed by Vivaldi and others. Bach had become familiar with typical examples of the genre at a relatively early date, inspiring him to engage with it and prepare transcriptions for organ and harpsichord during his years in Weimar from 1708 to 1717. The fruits of this interest fall into two groups, the first comprising six arrangements, BWV 592–97, the second set 16, BWV 972–87.

In his Italian Concerto, Bach took this idea a stage further by using the instrument’s two manuals to create a series of contrasts, clearly alluding in the process to elements developed by Vivaldi, such as the ritornello theme that progressively enters on different degrees of the scale and is treated contrapuntally with the solo sections that are found between them and that are accompanied by relatively few voices. The composition as a whole may be said to flirt with the idea of being a keyboard reduction of a genuine orchestral work. It’s also interesting that it was a sinfonia from Georg Muffat’s Florilegium primum of 1695 that provided Bach with his inspiration; the affinities between the thematic ideas in both works are palpable.

In a review that he published in 1739, Johann Adolf Scheibe, one of the first music critics in Germany, found it impossible not to admire the Italian Concerto: “Preeminent among published musical works is a clavier concerto of which the author is the famous Bach in Leipzig and which is in the key of F Major. Since this piece is arranged in the best possible fashion for this kind of work, I believe that it will doubtless be familiar to all great composers and experienced clavier players, as well as to amateurs of the clavier and music in general. Who is there who will not admit at once that this clavier concerto is to be regarded as a perfect model of a well-designed solo concerto? But at the present time we shall be able to name as yet very few or practically no concertos of such excellent qualities and such well-designed execution. It would take as great a master of music as Mr. Bach, who has almost alone taken possession of the clavier … to provide us with such a piece in this form of composition.” [Editor’s Note: Trans. from The Bach Reader. ]

The introductory bars of the Italian Concerto could hardly be more affirmative and are immediately repeated in the dominant. In the solo passages it is generally the performer’s right hand that takes the role of the soloist, while the left hand provides the accompaniment and occasionally contributes additional melodic material. The jewel of the piece is its slow movement, which is headed Andante (in other words, not too slow). A rhapsodic melody of great beauty soars freely over a highly organized and at times sequential bass. With its darker, minor-key coloring, the coda evokes a mood of oppression and somber resignation, which also lends a note of tragedy to the cantabile middle movement. This movement is arguably the one that most closely resembles one of Bach’s Italian models, except that Bach writes out in full his florid embellishments rather than leaving them to the performer’s imagination. Scheibe criticized Bach for doing so: “Every ornament, every little grace, and everything that one thinks of as belonging to the method of playing, he expresses completely in notes; and this not only takes away from his pieces the beauty of harmony, but completely covers the melody throughout.”

As to why Bach published a second volume of the Clavier-Übung with only two, much shorter works, the Italian Concerto and the French Overture in B Minor, BWV 831, the answer can be no more than speculation. But the fact is that the title Clavier-Übung mustn’t be confused with or even mistaken for “études” or a compositional treatise. It’s much more the fact that titles like these had been commonly applied to “use music” of the time and epoch.

BWV 904, the Fantasia and Fugue in A Minor, falls into a catch-all category of works for solo keyboard that encompass BWV numbers 846 through 962, and include preludes, fugues, fantasias, and toccatas. The A-Minor Fantasia and Fugue and the next number of your disc, the Fantasia [Adagio] and its unfinished Fugue in C Minor, BWV 906, fall into the same category. Can you explain a bit more about the interpolated Adagio, which I understand from your notes is Bach’s own arrangement of the Adagio movement from his G-Major Unaccompanied Violin Sonata. You say that Busoni provided a completion to the unfinished fugue and inserted the Adagio movement between the Fantasia and the Fugue to create a three-movement structure. So you’ve adopted Busoni’s edition for your recording? Do I have that right?

Yes, an absolute masterpiece from Bach’s years of maturity is the Fantasia in C Minor, BWV 906, which was written towards the end of the 1730s. Here Bach explores the world of Neapolitan keyboard music created by Alessandro and Domenico Scarlatti, one of the principal effects of which was the crossing of the performer’s hands. Succinct in terms of its motivic and thematic writing and filled with a sense of intense motoric urgency, the Fantasia reflects its composer’s engagement with Classical sonata form. The first subject-group is followed by a much calmer episode that serves as a second subject, while the development section gives way to a foreshortened recapitulation. It’s regrettable that the ensuing fugue remained unfinished; at least it has come down to us in only an incomplete form. Wholly unique, it is cast, rather, in the form of a fantasia and sets out to explore a world of such unprecedented novelty that we might be forgiven for thinking that this was an experimental study rather than a piece intended for publication. Note in particular the bold chromatic progressions and examples of contrary motion, to say nothing of the work’s audacious harmonic writing. Whereas the first part of the fugue is unquestionably by Bach, the authorship of the second, more diffuse, section is uncertain. Ferruccio Busoni completed the fugue, extending its original 47 bars to 96 with a display of contrapuntal mastery. In order to achieve the inner cohesion of a three-movement sonata-like work, he also interpolated between the Fantasia and Fugue the Adagio in G Major, BWV 968, which Bach himself had arranged from his Third Sonata for Unaccompanied Violin, BWV 1005. The source of this arrangement is an autograph manuscript by Johann Christoph Altnickol, headed “SONATA per il CEMBALO Solo del Sigre J. S. Bach,” although stylistically speaking the arrangement tends rather to point in the direction of the generation of Bach’s sons, notably Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. But it is possible that the arranger was Altnickol himself. Whatever the answer, the arrangement is a fine example of the way in which a violin piece could be adapted for a keyboard of the time. The low register of the writing may be due to the fact that the following movements of the violin sonata were also intended to be transcribed without violating their melodic lines, but it may also be an argument in favor of the use of a particular instrument such as a lute-harpsichord.

I followed the idea of Busoni to interpolate the Adagio as a “completion” of this unfinished work, and to give an impression (or even illusion?) of a complete “three-movement” work in the manner of Scarlatti. But the transcription of the Adagio itself is either Bach’s original, or perhaps by Wilhelm Friedemann, or even by Bach’s son-in-law, Altnickol.

Every time I hear the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue, I imagine Bach saying to his students, “Und here, Kinder, ist vat you can do mit dem fully diminished seventh chord.” It may be true that there’s nothing else like it in Bach’s output—it’s unique among his works—but given Bach’s comprehensive knowledge of the music that came before him, and his summing up of the entire Baroque era, don’t you think he was aware of the precedents for this sort of thing in the early 17th-century florid and often fanciful keyboard and lute capriccios and toccatas by Frescobaldi?

Indeed, as one of the high points of Bach’s output for the keyboard, and also as a special case within that group of works, the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 903, has always enjoyed particular acclaim. The piece is believed to date from Bach’s years in Cöthen from 1717 to 1723, and inspired Forkel to comment: “I have taken infinite pains to discover another piece of this kind by Bach, but in vain. This fantasia is unique, and never had its like.” And Forkel was to be proved right, for BWV 903 is rightly regarded by performers and listeners alike as one of the high points of Bach’s whole output as a keyboard composer. The fact that the fantasia’s popularity is not limited to our own age or even to the Bach revival of the 19th century, but dates back to the composer’s own day, is clear from the high opinion of it expressed by his contemporaries. Wilhelm Friedemann even predicted that it would “remain beautiful for all ages,” a prediction that holds true today.

The work’s key of D Minor recalls the no less popular Toccata and Fugue for organ, BWV 565, and the same is true of its free form, which reflects Bach’s artistry as an improviser. The autograph score of the Chromatic Fantasia is no longer extant, making it difficult, if not impossible, to date the work with any accuracy; but from 1730 onwards Bach set his pupils the task of writing it out, which at least provides us with a terminus ante quem.

The uniqueness of the Fantasia rests on its exuberant chromaticisms, which convey a feeling of infinity through the extensive use of enharmonic change, to say nothing of all the suspensions and passing notes, in that way inducing a state of weightlessness in the listener. No less important is the immediacy of the music’s expressive language, thanks in no small part to the privileged position accorded to a recitative-like passage located at the very center of the work. The chromatic modulations speak a language all their own, recalling the religiously inspired rhetoric of grief and mourning that invites an attitude of calm resignation, one which is also to be found at a later date in the music of Liszt. But the anguished chromaticisms also create a sense of erotic tension that invites comparisons with Wagner’s Tristanesque harmonies, where the excesses and liberties found in Wagner’s chromatic procedures achieve a unique degree of expressiveness and a personal intimacy in terms of a musical language that points in the direction of the mysterious and the metaphysical.

The ending of the Fantasia is unique. A five-bar coda over a pedal point on D, it features a series of chords of a diminished seventh descending over the span of an octave, the scales of each figure being varied with filigree delicacy and accompanied by playful ornamental figures in the upper voice. It is from this sense of sinking into a feeling of gloomy resignation and rampant imagination that the subject of the ensuing fugue emerges, a line that rises stepwise from A to C.

Just as the final section of the Fantasia harnesses together such remote keys as B-flat Minor and C-sharp Minor, so in the central section of the Fugue, Bach goes beyond fixed key relationships, which has real consequences for the listener. It becomes difficult to follow the directions in which the modulations and harmonies are going. Bach introduces his subject, which is, however, not fully chromatic, in B Minor in bars 76–83, then in E Minor in bars 90–97, combining both entries with a modulation to a particularly remote tonality.

“Well-tempered” tuning was not the only reason why music systems developed as they did at this period. Chromatic and enharmonic procedures involving a playful approach to tonality, thus allowing composers to demonstrate both their boldness and their abilities, were by no means unusual in the vocal and keyboard music of the time. The famous exchange of cantatas between Gasparini and Alessandro Scarlatti in 1712 is merely one example among many. The flamboyance of Bach’s bold harmonic writing, in conjunction with the highly virtuosic aspects of the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue, have encouraged performers to emphasize these elements in concerts and in arrangements.

In the 19th century the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue was a classic example of the Romantics’ approach to Bach. One of the founders of the Bach revival, Felix Mendelssohn performed the Fantasia at two concerts in the Leipzig Gewandhaus in February 1840 and January 1841, firing his audience with tremendous enthusiasm. He himself attributed the impact of his performance to his free interpretation of the arpeggios in the Fantasia and to his ability to exploit the effects of one of the grand pianos of the time, using differentiated dynamics, picking out the top notes, overusing the sustaining pedal and doubling the bass notes. This interpretation became the model for the second movement (Adagio) of Mendelssohn’s Second Cello Sonata, op. 58, of 1841–1843, in which the top notes of the arpeggio in the piano spell out a chorale melody while the cello plays an extended recitative recalling the recitative from Bach’s Chromatic Fantasia, and even quoting the final bars of this last-named work.

This Romantic interpretation proved influential. As a young virtuoso, Johannes Brahms used to launch his concerts with the Chromatic Fantasia, while Liszt, too, performed the work at his recitals. Max Reger even prepared an organ arrangement. Bach’s highly expressive work, which is surely one of his most personal, has retained its fascination across the centuries. It has also been frequently reprinted with interpretative additions and performing markings. In his own edition of the work, the Romantic Bach interpreter Ferruccio Busoni drew a distinction between the final passage as the coda and the recitative.

The Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue is a visionary work that looks far beyond its age in terms of its formal design, its structure, its character, and its inherent musical language. Even today it continues to point the way forward. And YES, Bach indeed was aware of the precedents for this sort of thing in the early 17th-century florid and often fanciful keyboard and lute capriccios and toccatas by Frescobaldi, but also of the precedents of the French clavecinists, e.g., Rameau, Couperin, and de Grigny, who all created a very, very virtuoso style. And YES, Bach had studied and knew these compositions very, very well, and integrated these compositional elements and refinements of ornamentation into his works, such as the French Suites, the French Ouverture, the Goldberg Variations, and The Art of Fugue (as, for example in Contrapunctus 6, “in Stile francese”).

Switching gears to the subjects of performance and recording, let me ask if you used the same Steinway piano for this new Bach program as you did for your Goldberg Variations. You mentioned earlier that you thought highly of Angela Hewitt’s Bach, so I must tell you that I have consistently cited her Bach, along with András Schiff’s and Craig Sheppard’s, as being my top choices. There’s a playfulness in Hewitt’s Bach that I really like, and she has chosen to perform on a Fazioli piano. So what guides your choice of instrument?

Yes, I know Hewitt plays on a Fazioli. In fact, I was one of the first to play on a Fazioli F-308, when the company was starting out. This was in 1988, and for one of my earliest recordings (a Brahms CD released by Bayer), I used a Fazioli F-308. In 1990, I became “Official Artist of Steinway & Sons” and got their best instruments and best services, and from this time I concentrated only on Steinway. (My friend Georges Ammann, the chief technician for Steinway Hamburg, not only tours with me for all my recording sessions, but also assists with my recitals.) The instrument on this Bach CD is one of my own Steinways from Steinway Hamburg, one which I had hoped to find for many years and then found in 2010. My pianos in general are alive to me and a mirror of me, so it was vital to get that relation right. The Steinway Grand D-274 that I play on my new Bach SACD is not the same instrument I used for my Goldbergs. For the new program I needed a much more rich-toned instrument and, so I think, it’s appropriate. Piano and artist have to blend into one. That’s my artistic credo.

So, what are my personal demands of an instrument? It has to fulfill all artistic requirements to the highest degree: full sound; ability to sustain tones, which is a prerequisite to realize the polyphonic structures, especially to point out the longer notes and organ-points; and then, great flexibility in the tonal palette, which is enormously important for underlining the independence of the voices, and which can bring out countless registrations like on an organ. The mechanical lightness, which enabled me to realize the extreme virtuosity in the faster movements of the variations, is so wonderful. The complete range of tone and voicing of the instrument is so plastic that the clarity of the polyphony is guaranteed at all times.

But, to bring out all these qualities, all aspects have to come together. My piano technician, Georges Ammann, is one of the best such technicians in the world, and as the chief technician of Steinway Hamburg he collaborates with all major pianists. It’s his professional knowledge and experience that have enabled this instrument to achieve its full potential. He really did a great job! Otherwise, it’s my recording producers, Friedemann Engelbrecht and Tobias Lehmann, and my recording engineer, Julian Schwenkner (Teldex-Studio in Berlin, teldexstudio.de, which is renowned throughout Europe), who worked on the really unique reproduction of my piano sound.

As we all know, the singularity in the art of Bach is the fusion of both the horizontal and vertical lines. It’s a real wonder to see that the creation and forming of the horizontal line, the polyphonic structure, also results in this perfect, beautiful vertical line, the harmonic line. As we also know, Bach already used the full harmonic range and radius as no composer before him. My artistic aim of course is to point out the horizontal line in a dynamically elastic way, but in the same breath, to form the harmonic line in a bright field of color (I would call it “harmonic articulation”) to achieve a particular atmosphere of emotions and moods, drama, velocity, vividness, and so on. As we can imagine, these are high demands for an instrument. This instrument has these prerequisites, because the clarity on one side delineates the polyphonic structure, but these lines also blend into a “compact sound,” by which it’s possible to realize and verify the harmonic articulation I‘ve described. One can be lucky to find an instrument with both qualities.

This next question is one I ask of every instrumentalist I interview, so you’re not going to get away without having to answer it. We spoke earlier about playing Bach on the piano vs. the harpsichord, but there’s a further distinction to be made between “modern” piano, “period” piano, and fortepiano. Bach would have had the opportunity to play on the latter, when he visited Frederick II in Potsdam in 1747. Is there a case to be made for performing Bach on fortepiano? I ask this for two reasons: One, some very fine recordings of Brahms’s solo piano music have come my way recently, featuring performances on various pianos of the composer’s time; and two, I’m just curious to know in general your attitude towards performing on period instruments, whether authentic or copies thereof.

It’s a profound deliberation and decision to perform Bach on the piano—or on harpsichord. One has to free oneself from the idea that the compositions of Bach are strictly bound to the instruments of the Baroque epoch. One has to remember that Bach himself used other keyboards than the harpsichord, such as the spinet and the clavichord, all instruments that have their own character and different handling and so have a decisive effect on interpretation. That means Bach himself didn’t restrict performers to one instrument, one sound, and one manner to play his pieces.

And then we have Bach's compositions for organ, another other style in music, structure, and sound altogether. Bach was a very versatile and complex, nearly multilayered composer, and I’m convinced, if Bach also had known the piano concert grand of today, he would have been fascinated by the richness of artistic possibilities.

On the other hand, if one knows the historic background of Bach interpretation, one has to confess that many readings of the text of the compositions in whole must be dependent on the style of harpsichord, spinet, and clavichord playing, especially articulation and phrasing. These readings cannot directly be produced on a concert grand piano. One has to verify and reproduce these readings in another manner by pointing out the original meaning in a relative manner, but one that is convincing in relation to the new instrument.

To answer your question directly, even being a concert pianist, I don’t find in general that it’s necessary in some final sense to perform Bach on a concert grand piano. To play Bach in historic academic style absolutely has to be defended, and these interpretations surely have their absolute justification. But if you already make the jump to play Bach on the piano, you have to do this with all the consequences. Then you must not play Bach in the style you would on harpsichord; no, you have to play the concert grand with all its possibilities—otherwise it wouldn’t be convincing, because the piano totally would be undermined in its tonal variety.

In the case you mention of Brahms’s music performed on pianos of his time, yes, it gives an excellent insight into how the music of this period actually sounded and, objectively, what instruments Brahms knew and heard. But in conclusion, for all the interest in period instruments and historic performance, I’m personally committed to modern pianos. It’s a question of personality, mentality, and character.

Tell me about your new recording. I recall you mentioning in an earlier conversation we had that there were two different engineers who produced the SACD—one for the standard two-channel layer, the other for the multi-channel surround sound layer. Isn’t that unusual? Can you explain how and why that came about?

I wanted to deliver something state-of-the-art. So, the tasks have been divvied up, and each of my technicians did a great job! It was mainly Julian Schwenkner who mixed the Surround version. Each of these three layers is individually engineered and has its own character and sound.

There’s no denying that SACD benefits big, heavily-scored Romantic-period works—your recording, by the way, sounds fantastic in either format—but I wonder, really, what advantage multi-channel technology brings to a solo piano recital or even to a string quartet, where you don’t have the side-to-side and front-to-rear dimensional spread you do with a large orchestra laid out before you.

It’s a personal preference for me that I like rich-toned sounds and halls. So, frankly, I wanted to give my listeners, who are able to play the disc in SACD Surround 5.0, the feeling and impression of being in a concert hall rotunda, with the sense that the piano is placed in the middle of the auditorium with the audience surrounding it. That way, the listener becomes part of the music, the artist, the interpretation, the acoustic of the hall, and the complete experience. I call it “the tension of a live performance.”

Okay, so what’s next on your agenda? More Bach, more Schumann, more Chopin? Or are you ready to branch out into different repertoire?

I’ve already produced two SACDs with major works by Chopin. I will continue that project in April 2015, in Berlin, so that Divine Art can release this edition in a three-SACD package. The program promises to be something special.

And of course I’m ready to branch out into different repertoire—Scarlatti, Mozart, and Schumann. But Bach and Chopin will continue to be central and keep me busy the rest of my life...

Go to Top

 


Nina-Anna Beckmann: Der Wahrheitssucher
BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN: Wie sich der international renommierte Pianist ein Werk erarbeitet
 - 'Main-Netz' - "Kultur" - November 24, 2012

Wohnt klassischen Kompositionen eine Wahrheit inne? Gibt es eine Interpretation, die richtiger ist als andere? Burkard Schliessmann würde mit einem entschiedenen „ja“ antworten. Der Pianist ist beständig auf der Suche nach dieser Wahrheit, nach diesem einkomponierten Duktus. Einem Taucher gleich begibt er sich bis auf den Grund eines Stückes und ruht nicht eher, als bis er es in seiner Gesamtheit erfasst hat. ...

Schliessmanns musikalische Vorliebe gehört den deutschen Romantiker, da sie die Klaviermusik entscheidend geprägt haben, wie er sagt. Aber auch Chopin zählt zu seinen bevorzugten Komponisten, „weil er ein ganzes Leben ist“. Ein Leben, das bei Burkard Schliessmann von Anfang an der Musik gewidmet war. Seine Großmutter, mit der ihn zeitlebens eine besondere Beziehung verband, kaufte anlässlich seiner Geburt ein Steinway-Klavier, auf dem er mit zweieinhalb Jahren zu spielen begann. Allein vom Hören konnte er alles nachspielen, mit 21 Jahren beherrschte Schliessmann, der auch Orgel spielt, das gesamte Werk Bachs auswendig. Heute ist der mehrfach mit angesehenen Musikpreisen ausgezeichnete Künstler in den USA ein Star und akkreditierter Künstler von Steinway & Son, so dass ihm ein Flügel seiner Wahl vom Firmensitz in Hamburg zum Ort seiner Konzerte transportiert wird.

Trotz aller Erfolge und allem Erreichten sagt Schliessmann selbst über sich: „Ich bin ein ewig Suchender“ und meint damit seine Arbeitsweise. Erarbeitet er sich ein neues Stück, dann wird alles der Suche nach der Wahrheit, der Richtigkeit seiner Interpretation untergeordnet. Wie ein Getriebener, der keine Kompromisse macht, für den es nur ein Ganz oder gar nicht gibt, nähert er sich der Komposition zuerst intuitiv. Dann erschließt er sich das Werk nicht nur technisch und emotional, sondern auch intellektuell.

Der historische Kontext des Komponisten, dessen mögliche Inspirationsquellen, sein kulturelles Milieu, sein gesamtes Schaffen und nicht zuletzt seine früheste Rezeption bezieht Schliessmann in seine Wahrheitsfindung mit ein. Auch das Notenbild reflektiert er intensiv, erforscht Spannungen und Rhythmen, geht den der Musik innewohnenden Strukturen und Energien auf den Grund. Alles zusammen ergibt verbunden mit seiner eigenen Lebenserfahrung und seinem außerordentlichen Talent seine Interpretation, die für ihn nicht eine von mehreren Möglichkeiten, sondern seine Antwort, seine Wahrheit ist.

Ob er diese Wahrheit gefunden hat, macht er an der Reaktion des Publikums fest. „Während eines Konzerts gibt es immer eine Interaktion zwischen den Zuhörern und dem Künstler: Ich sauge das Publikum in mich auf wie ein Schwamm – wenn sich ein Gänsehaut-Gefühl einstellt, dann ist es geglückt“, erklärt Schliessmann. Für seine Zuhörer offenbaren seine Interpretationen oft völlig neue, überraschende Facetten, selbst bei zuvor oft gehörten Werken. Plötzlich erscheint alles so klar, als hätte es nie einen Zweifel daran gegeben, dass diese Komposition exakt so zu spielen sei.

»Tiefe und Menschlichkeit«

„Ein Konzerterlebnis sollte sowohl für den Interpreten als auch für das Publikum wie ein Tauchgang sein, wie eine Reise in ferne, wunderbare Welten“, hat Schliessmann einmal gesagt. Das Bild des Tauchers passt in doppelter Hinsicht, denn der gebürtige Aschaffenburger ist mit über 6500 Tauchgängen ein leidenschaftlicher Anhänger dieses Sports. Angst kenne er nicht, sagt er. Geprägt wurde er auch durch seine zehn Jahre währende Tätigkeit als Rettungssanitäter bei den Maltesern, wo er im Rahmen des „Katastrophenschutzes“ zehn Jahre lang immer an den Wochenenden rund 250 Stunden pro Jahr ehrenamtlich tätig war. „So etwas prägt und lässt Tiefe und Menschlichkeit zu“, sagt er. Tiefe und Menschlichkeit, die in seine Musik einfließen. Ob er mit dem, was er erreicht hat zufrieden ist? Burkard Schliessmann schmunzelt und lässt Schumann für sich sprechen: „Es hat des Lernens kein Ende“.

Go to Top

 


“Cannons camouflaged by Flowers”: BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN Talks about Chopin
By Peter J. Rabinowitz - FANFARE-Magazin, May-June 2010

Chopin is so central to our musical life that it’s easy to take him for granted—but his bicentennial offers a chance to rethink both his position in our culture and the way we play him.
Pianist Burkard Schliessmann is currently engaged in a recording project to celebrate the occasion, so this seemed an especially apt time to ask him about Chopin and about his interpretive perspective. We began our series of email exchanges with a discussion of Chopin’s stature in the repertoire. He was, after all, but one member of a prodigiously talented cohort of composers who created what we now think of as the high romantic movement; yet his music has lasted when the music by Herz, Felicien David, Thalberg, Heller, and Sterndale Bennet is all but
forgotten. Why?

“Herz, Thalberg, Heller, Felicien David and others were great virtuosos of their time, more famous than Chopin himself. They had their own personal styles, but the essence of their music was time-bound, nothing that could occupy generations after them. Chopin, in contrast, was someone special, someone who was completely different from all other artists, composers,
and pianists. So too with his style. As a result, the aesthetic in approaching Chopin is distinctive: interpreting his music is the most difficult of all. For me personally, it’s the crowning of playing
piano. Bach, Mozart, Chopin: these are the three who definitively created musical art in an allembracing and overwhelming way.”

What in his circumstances made Chopin so different?

“Chopin’s biography remains obscure. He withheld himself all his life, in diametrical contrast to the openness and accessibility
of his contemporary Franz Liszt. Chopin always conveyed the impression of a suffering soul, not to say a martyr, almost as if this was to nourish or even underpin his inspiration. Striving for
crystalline perfection, he never ventured outside his own domain. You know, the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard is said to have given, as a child, “martyr” as his chosen career.
Chopin must have shared this cult of the ‘Pater dolorosus.’”

To be sure, Schliessmann continues, Chopin was a European celebrity—but even in his celebrity, “he was surrounded by an aura of mystery. Even as a practicing pianist, he was a special case. His playing is described by all his contemporaries as exceptionally individual. He rarely appeared on the concert platform, but he was feverishly awaited by his followers. Ignaz Moscheles, himself one of the leading pianists of the 19th century, described Chopin as follows in 1839: His appearance is altogether identified with his music, both are tender and ardent. He played to me at my request, and only now do I understand his music…. His ad libitum
playing, which degenerates into a loss of bar structure among the interpreters of his music, is in his hands only the most delightful originality of performance; the dilettantishly hard modulations, which I cannot rise above when I play his pieces, no longer shock me, because he trips through them so delicately with his elfin touch; his piano is so softly whispered that he needs no powerful forte to express the desired contrasts; accordingly one does not miss the orchestra-like effects which the German school demands of a pianoforte player, but is carried away, as if by a singer who yields to his feelings with little concern for his accompaniment; in a word, he is unique in the world of pianoforte players. This is perhaps the most expressive and beautiful commentary on Chopin’s pianistic status.”

Given his quality and popularity as a performer, why did he play so seldom? Was it simply a matter of poor health?

“Chopin himself told Liszt, whose virtuosity he always admired:
‘I am not suited to giving concerts; the audience scares me, its breath stifles me, its inquisitive looks cripple me, I fall silent before strange faces.’”

I suggested we return for a moment to Moscheles’ description: what, in fact, do we know about Chopin’s actual practice with regard to rubato?

“There has been much discussion of this, with his contemporaries greatly differing in their views. One of his students recalled,
His playing was always noble and fine, his gentlest tones always sang, whether at full strength or in the softest piano. He took infinite pains to teach the pupil this smooth, songful playing. ‘He (she) does not know how to join two notes’—that was his severest
criticism. He also required that his pupils should maintain the strictest rhythm, hated all stretching and tugging, inappropriate rubato and exaggerated ritardando.
This recollection polarized whole generations of piano professors in their search for the meaning of rubato, particularly in view of other, more weighty opinions, such as those of Berlioz, who
saw Chopin’s playing as marred by exaggerated license and excessive willfulness. Evidently he did not allow his pupils the license he reserved for himself.”

To put it in different terms, Schliessmann continues, “Chopin’s rubato never can be handled in a free and uncontrolled way—you will lose the line. It has nothing to do with improvisation. Chopin himself advised his students: ‘The left hand is the conductor, it mustn’t falter and waver.’”

Schliessmann clarified his sense of Chopin’s character by contrasting him with his contemporary Schumann, whose bicentennial also falls this year:

“To approach Chopin, you have to separate him completely from Schumann. Schumann admired Chopin very much and saw him as friend, but—what only few people know— Chopin himself had much less interest in and esteem for Schumann.

“In detail: Schumann’s works follow on from a transitional period determined by the successors of Viennese Classicism, particularly Beethoven. Just as the sons of Bach espoused the ‘galant,’ ornamented style of their generation, so the pupils of Mozart and Beethoven—Hummel, Ries, Czerny, Moscheles—took pains to compensate for a thinner musical substance with increased instrumental brilliance and thus prepared the ground for the golden age of the piano and the era of the Romantic virtuoso. Among the multitude of composers writing for the piano at that time, only two—Weber and Schubert—stand out as original creative forces.

“The trends that produced Schumann’s early piano works started out not so much from Weber’s refined brilliance as from Schubert’s more intimate and deeply soul-searching idiom. His creative imagination took him well beyond the harmonic sequences known until his time. He looked at the fugues and canons of earlier composers and discovered in them a Romantic principle. In the interweaving of the voices, the essence of counterpoint found its parallel in the mysterious relationships between the human psyche and exterior phenomena, which Schumann felt impelled to express.

“Schubert’s broad melodic lyricism has often been contrasted with Schumann’s terse, often quickly repeated motifs, and by comparison Schumann is often erroneously seen as shortwinded.
Yet it is precisely with these short melodic formulae that he shone his searchlight into the previously unplumbed depths of the human psyche. With them, in a complex canonic web, he wove a dense tissue of sound capable of taking in and reflecting back all the poetical character present. His actual melodies rarely have an arioso form; his harmonic system combines subtle chromatic progressions, suspensions, a rapid alternation of minor and major, and point d’orgue. The shape of Schumann’s scores is characterized by contrapuntal lines, and can at first seem opaque or confused. His music is frequently marked by martial dotted rhythms or dance-like triple time signatures. He loves to veil accented beats of the bar by teasingly intertwining two simultaneous voices in independent motion. This highly independent instrumental style is perfectly attuned to his own particular compositional idiom. After a period in which the piano
had indulged in sensuous beauty of sound and brilliant coloration, in Schumann it again became a tool for conveying poetic monologues in musical terms.

“Like many a Romantic, Schumann found himself up against an artistic dilemma, with various different branches of the arts open to him. Like the ‘art-loving monk’ in Wackenroder’s rhapsodic essays, the Herzensergiessungen eines kunstliebenden Klosterbruders, he poured his enthusiasms into creating a ‘golden reflection of life.’ In his diary written at age fifteen he was already questing to find the true foundations of his own nature: ‘Whether or not I am a poet is up to posterity to decide.’ And the momentous realization that ‘There does indeed seem to be something unfathomable in me” is an indication that this Romantic artist in the making had a ‘daemonic’ element in him.

“Undoubtedly the best language for the expression of this ‘unfathomable’ quality was music. The infinity of musical spheres of expression, independent of rationality, is often perceived as ‘unfathomable’ by listeners too. The formal principles of order seem to lie hidden deeper in this art than in others. In the twentieth century the great creative minds, when faced with Romantic artistic urges running riot which they believe must be overcome, or feel they have succeeded in overcoming, have stressed the importance of existing rules; they have followed
traditional forms, or else, in their search for new ways to connect, have found and set up new formulations and principles. The young Schumann’s creative path led in the opposite direction, from classical forms, however deeply revered, to the freedom of subjective self-expression.

“This is an absolute deep contrast to Chopin, who found himself favoring a classical form of musical essence. He needs to bring nothing in from outside, the music is nearly ‘absolute.’”

Schliessmann elaborates on this difference by looking at Schumann’s Kreisleriana.

“No other cycle among Schumann’s great works so perfectly expresses the sensation of dark nocturnal things, of chaos, lurking in the background. The last piece of this collection shows this
particularly well. Like skeletons on horseback, shadowy figures flit before us in a soft, sustained rhythm; in the middle section horn-calls enliven the scene with visions of knightly strength and
nobility, but at the end the figures vanish ghost-like into night and mystery. Looking into the first volume of Schumann’s diaries we find ‘Midnight Piece,’ a prose passage which provides moving, indeed alarming evidence of his perilously depressive mental state. It contains elements of a highly personal kind which memorably convey the particular quality of his imagination,
mortally cold and never far from visions of death. It could have served perfectly as a model for the final, disturbing piece in the Kreisleriana set.

“Such abstruse ideas are totally alien to Chopin. The Romantic interweaving of music and literature that was characteristic of Schumann and Liszt was a negligible source of inspiration. Schumann dedicated Kreisleriana to Chopin, but in fact Chopin’s consciousness for classical strength and form had nothing in common with the exalted, torn, eccentric and confused character of the work.

“Yet in a relatively short creative life of twenty years or so, Chopin re-drew the boundaries of Romantic music, and his self-imposed restriction to the 88 keys of the piano keyboard sublimated nothing less than the aesthetic essence of piano music. It was his total
identification with the instrument which, in its radical regeneration of the lyric and the dramatic, fantasy and passion and their unique fusion, shaped a tonal language which united an aristocratic
sense of style and formal Classical training and intuition with an ascetic rigor. Chopin’s precisely marshaled trains of thought permitted no experiments, and so he did not ‘wander about’ within
his stylistic points of reference as Scriabin was to do.”

Chopin’s works may seem light and improvisatory, but they are “planned in meticulous details, exactly and well calculated.”
Ascetic rigor?

I asked Schliessmann to elaborate.

“This doesn’t mean something like ‘renounce’ or even a ‘lack’ of something. No, it means, in philosophical manner (and especially
in the historic Greek sense of ‘Askesis’), a special kind of internal yearning, a special power wherein, despite all depressions, defeats, and failures you develop a new power to ‘keep’ to
something, to create something. It’s something like an obsession. Bach, Mozart, Schubert, they all (and their oeuvre) are filled from this phenomenon, and it’s this spirit which keeps this music so vivid and alive – and fashioned for all times and generations.”

A big anniversary seems a good time to think about where we’ve come from—what’s Schliessmann’s sense of the history of Chopin performance and his position in it?

“I’m very interested in the ‘Culture of Interpretation.’ I’m convinced that each great artist has his own personal style, but it is his artistic responsibility in developing this style to respond other interpretations, either prior or at the same time. I’m convinced that Rubinstein would have presented us another Chopin if Cortot had not existed. Cortot presented very romantic Chopin interpretations—really masterly, outstanding, but confused. Rubinstein’s immediate answer was a very classical Chopin. He was really the first to point out the classical line and structure in his oeuvre.”

No surprise that Schliessmann’s most admired pianists recognize this classical element.

“Chopin has to be ‘controlled.’ So, Michelangeli is one of them I was inspired most. The young Pogorelich also played a passionate, but also ‘classical’ and completely controlled Chopin. I regret so much that – after the tragic death of his wife – he lost his ‘mentor.’ Also Stefan Askenase, an ‘old fashioned’ pianist, but someone with a special view into and onto the complete oeuvre, celebrated Chopin in a more classical way. And someone special: Mieczyslaw
Horszowski.”

I ask Schliessmann what, precisely, he means by “artistic responsibility.”

He answers using Bach performance as his example: “After the re-discovery of Bach by Mendelssohn, Bach was interpreted in a very romantic style. This had nothing to do with Bach. Leopold Stokowski made arrangements for orchestra. O.K., the public had a chance to know the works, but it also had nothing to do with Bach. So Tureck and Gould”—despite their substantial differences—“came and made something completely radical. Only in this way was there a chance to ‘correct’ the ‘picture’ of interpretation and move in the right direction.”

A direction, he points that, that continued to give a new way, even to later generations.

“This is artistic responsibility.”

Already in 2002, I pointed out, Schliessmann’s Chopin playing showed awareness of this responsibility, tempering the drama of Cortot with the classicism of Rubinstein. I asked him—is
anything different now?

“I myself had worked for a long time to reach a well-balanced
combination to keep close together all parameters”: both the classicism and the romanticism. “Of course, I have increased my technique to bring out these insights, and so it all has a much more
virtuoso effect than years before. My priority has been to bring out Chopin as an aspect of human realism, as I already did it with Bach and the Goldbergs. So my new edition is a big challenge
for me to surpass myself.”

Schliessmann has closely studied the descriptions of these pieces written by musicians at the time: Liszt, Tausig, Schumann, and Hanslick, among others; and he has a growing sense of the ideals behind the music. He especially admires Schumann’s famous description of Chopin: Chopin’s works are cannons camouflaged by flowers. In this his origin, in the fate of his nation, rests the explanation of his advantages and of his faults alike. If the talk is of enthusiasm, grace, freedom of expression, of awareness, fire and nobility, who would not think of him, but then again, who would not, when there is talk of foolishness, morbid eccentricity, even hatred and fury!”

How does this description influence Schliessmann?

“This has been my ideal since earliest childhood. One cannot describe Chopin better. Here you find the ‘explosion,’ which is hidden under a ‘surface,’ which means something completely different!”

Granted, these 19th-century ideals are complex: even Liszt himself had trouble understanding the Polonaise-Fantaisie. But Schliessmann feels that he is getting closer to meet the “the challenge of shaping this work so as to do justice to its content: compelling, balanced organic structure throughout, with a view of its greatness, despite the risk of losing oneself in the limited execution of its wonderfully thrilling details. I give the work more intimacy; by maintaining the chamber-musician and classical clarity and structure in the different variations, the symphonic line is more of a single breath, and the different scenes are better proportioned.
The big line is, I’m convinced, more enlightened now. The end and stretta are much more touching, also much more virtuoso and overwhelming.”

He sees similar changes in performances of other works:

“The Barcarolle I play in a more erotic way, much more sensual, but much more virtuoso and so much more extreme. The Fantaisie now has a more virtuoso-line, more explosion and fire, so that the Agitato is transferred in a more ecstatic way; I have given much more drama to the octaves (e.g. in bar 153/154). The contrast between the intimacy of the middle part—which we can call a ‘hymnic choral’—and the Attacca of the Agitato gives this piece a special excitement.”

With these new and sharper intuitions, he hopes to move the listener more deeply.

Schliessmann has especially strong opinions about performances of the Berceuse, which he plays with more virtuosity than other pianists do.

“Too many pianists (I don’t want to name them) make the mistake of using too much rubato in the right hand.” In so doing, they not only “lose the glitter” which is written into the piece, but they also “miss the line of the left hand, changing the tempo (and consequently the character) of the left hand, an ostinato-line, which provides the main structure. If you lose this line in its strength as well as clarity— but also simplicity and lightness—you lose the meaning and real characterization of the whole piece and
its elegance. The cantilène, the endless and eternal song, the ‘chant’— and in summary the architecture of this work is destroyed. This mustn’t be!

“To the Ballades I have given a more ‘narrativo’ element, intensifying the ‘stile parlando,’ but increasing the virtuosity at the same time.” The ultimate aim is coherence—fitting together the lyricism, the poetry, the ‘speaking,’ and the virtuosity, maintaining, at the same time, the big line as a single breath.

The key point? We return to the classic essence of Chopin:

“Nothing should be arbitrary. When we have a look to his manuscripts, we learn that Chopin worked very hard on his ideas
and had something special in mind. Very often he wrote something, then rejected it and made many corrections, coming up with a completely different version, or, curiously, sometimes coming back to first version.”

I close our conversation with a final question. One of the biggest changes since 1960 Chopin celebration has been the growth of the period performance movement. Schliessmann remains committed to a modern instrument. Why?

“We know, that Chopin preferred the sound of Pleyel, which was much clearer, intimate, slim (nearly chamber-music-like) than the Erard Liszt used, which was much more rich-toned and orchestral. I personally never even wanted (how crazy and terrible!) to play on an old or historical piano, because the technique itself wouldn’t be sufficient for my demands.

“For this edition I used a special Steinway, one that I own, the same one on which I also played the Goldbergs. It has an extreme clarity and sonority, extreme colorfulness and unlimited ranges of registrations in all parts. It is an exceptional instrument that is ideal for music of classical style. Georges Ammann, world famous technician of Steinway, again did again a great job and had been on my side all the time. He has exclusively been looking after my instruments for years.

“For this music you absolutely need a special tone, a special sound. And something special the instrument must have (of course, you as pianist have to play it, but if the instrument can’t, you also can’t, because you are dependent on the instrument): It’s the phenomenon of Jeu perlé! The instrument I’m using reacts here in perfect manner, and when you hear—for example—the closing figures of the Barcarolle or the Fantaisie, you know what I mean and how it should be!

“I also divided the recordings between the halls. The works which need a more intimate atmosphere (like the Berceuse, the Barcarolle, the Waltz op. 64/2, the Polonaise-Fantaisie) were
recorded in the studio-hall of Teldex in Berlin, a hall with phenomenal acoustic. That’s where I also recorded my Goldbergs. The that need nearly something “orchestral” (like the Ballades, the
Scherzos), however, I recorded in another hall in Berlin, in the Big Hall of ‘Rundfunkcentrum’ in Berlin, which has outstanding acoustic possibilities and a very special warmness of sound. I again used one of my own Steinways, and again worked with my Teldex-Team, Friedemann Engelbrecht as Recording-Producer and Julian Schwenkner as my Recording-Engineer. To bring out such an result requires the combination and synergy of all powers. If only one link is missing from the chain, the complete project is ‘out.’”

To conclude?

“The things that are most important to me in such a project are perfectionism and truth. Truth of interpretation, truth of sound, truth of the instrument, truth of the hall, truth lastly of all. This means ‘Artistic Integrity’ to me. Coming back to my artistic aims
in my new Chopin: It’s a special combination of lyricism, poetry, virtuosity, noblesse (!), classical strength but also romantic enthusiasm and passion, in bringing out this ‘obscure man Chopin’ and creating an experience never before heard.”

Go to Top

 


BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN Articulates His Approach to BACH
By James Reel - FANFARE-Magazin January/February 2008

Following pianist Simone Dinnerstein’s fine new recording of Bach’s Goldberg Variations, covered in the previous issue, now comes a quite different traversal of the score by German pianist Burkard Schliessmann. I interviewed Schliessmann about this project via e-mail.

J.R.: Do you feel it’s necessary to defend the decision to perform Bach on the piano, rather than the harpsichord? Do the Goldberg Variations, in particular, adapt well to the piano, or do they present certain difficulties?

B.S.: It’s a profound deliberation and decision to perform Bach on the piano—or on harpsichord. One has to free oneself from the idea that the compositions of Bach are strictly bound to the instruments of the Baroque epoch. One has to remember that Bach himself used other keyboards than the harpsichord, such as the spinet and the clavichord, all instruments that have their own character and different handling and so have a decisive effect on interpretation. That means Bach himself didn’t restrict performers to one instrument, one sound, and one manner to play his pieces. And lastly we have the great Bach with his compositions for the organ, which again is a complete other style in music, structure, and sound. Bach was a very versatile and complex, nearly multilayered composer, and I’m convinced, if Bach also had known the piano concert grand of today, he would have been fascinated by the richness of artistic possibilities. On the other hand, if one knows the historic background of interpretation of Bach, one has to confess that many readings of the text of the compositions in whole must be dependent on the style of harpsichord, spinet, or clavichord. Especially articulation and phrasing. These readings cannot directly be produced on a piano concert grand. One has to verify and reproduce these readings in another manner on a piano concert grand by pointing out the original meaning in a relative manner, but one that is convincing in relation to the new instrument.

To be concrete regarding the first part of your question: Even being a concert pianist, I don’t find that it’s necessary in the last sense to perform Bach in general on the piano concert grand. To play Bach in historic academic style absolutely has to be defended, and these interpretations surely have their absolute justification. But if you already make the jump to decide to play Bach on the piano concert grand, you have to do this with all the consequences. Then you have to play Bach not in the style you would on harpsichord, no, you have to play out the concert grand with all its possibilities; otherwise it wouldn’t be convincing, because the piano totally would be undermined in its tonal variety.

In the case of the Goldberg Variations we are confronted with certain problems of realization on the piano concert grand: this piece really is conceived for a two-manual instrument in the original, and the crossing-over of both hands is well known for the enormous technical problems pianists have to bypass by keeping the pieces in tempo, especially the fast ones.

On the other hand, one has to realize that performing on the concert grand also is a great advantage in dynamic range, colors, and the independence of all voices. Giving each voice its own character in touch, dynamics, color, articulation, phrasing, and melodic line, you can build up a musical and artistic result that brings out a new tension, which lays itself like a net above the whole. Because of the rigidity of the sound of the harpsichord—sorry to all harpsichordists; it’s no criticism of your wonderful instrument, but I’m sure you understand what I mean—this is not possible in interpretation on harpsichord. Here the music has other priorities to be wrung out, as already mentioned, the articulation and phrasing.

In view that the Goldberg is a piece from the late period of Bach, and all the voices are structured with such lightness, the whole interpretation of this piece of music has to have something well proportioned, and at the same time, something that is filled with a special kind of “matter of course.” Therefore I’m absolutely convinced that, to bring this out, interpretation on the piano can be much more affecting, interesting, and artistically more valuable than on harpsichord.

The Goldberg Variations have always enjoyed a special status, with pianists regarding them as a touchstone of their technical and interpretative powers. At stake are the ability to light up the work from within, a tightrope walk that at the same time describes a vast circle, starting out and returning to a state of apotheotic stillness, the ability to find one’s bearings within a particular concentration of inner and outer complexity, an inner and outer coherence and homogeneity that are all-embracing, the ability, finally, to produce an explosion of inner cells by reduced means and, hence, a particular sensitivity, sinewy tension, and color. The performer must play a game with particular devices, finding solutions to the problems posed by the work not in octave doublings and other playful expedients but in a tightly structured inner rigor and order. What is demanded is a particular form of internalization, of inner and outer lyricism. It is this that makes the Goldberg Variations so unique—and so demanding.

This is my personal conviction of the Goldbergs. Therefore I personally favor the interpretation on piano concert grand with its richness of all emotional ranges, which, however, does not minimize the feats in history of the harpsichord-interpretations.

And last but not least: we know that the dedication of compositions to a particular instrument is to be seen relatively in Bach. Very often it was Bach himself who made transcriptions from certain works for other instruments, and, especially the cantatas and orchestral works often are based on the—for the Baroque-epoch so typically—style and manner of parody. Also, the greatest works, the Art of Fugue and the Musikalisches Opfer, only to name two, are not dedicated to a special instrument at all.

And regarding, for example, the organ works, it’s interesting to learn that these works also can be well performed not only on historic organs, but also on great Romantic organs that lay bare their truth; whereas typical Romantic organ works, for example those of Reger, cannot be realized on a Baroque organ. Here you see the internal independence of Bach’s compositions and how adaptable they lastly can be—and how modern at all times, epochs, and periods.

By this I find it absolutely defendable to interpret the Goldberg on the piano concert grand, whereas, however, one shouldn’t ignore the historic and necessary style of the harpsichord.

J.R.: I see that you have a history of performing Bach on the organ. How does that color your approach to the Goldberg Variations on the piano or does it not have an effect?

B.S.: Already at the age of 21 I played the complete organ works of Bach—and this by memory. As a child and youngster I had been taught by one of the last master-students of the legendary Helmut Walcha, and I completely had been affected by this style of insight into Bach and the internal structures. This method of regarding the independent coherence of all the voices gave me a special comprehension of Bach and his philosophy. Lastly one can say that I have been growing up with Bach, even to this day. If you understand the free organ works (preludes, toccatas, fugues), the chorales, and especially the trio sonatas, you have an insight into Bach that others don’t have. Especially the soloistic and independent leadings of the three voices of the trio sonatas is artistically the major aim of an organist; and already the Orgelbüchlein, the part 5 of the Peters Edition, shows Bach in all his structural and emotional effects. Albert Schweitzer described the Orgelbüchlein as something where the tonal speech of Bach is unbeatable. The comprehension of the organ-Bach is an understanding of the counterpoint and the polyphonic structures, and the coherence of Bach himself.

J.R.: What qualities led you to choose the particular piano you used for this recording?

B.S.: The piano I used is one of my own two Steinways. It’s a very new instrument, only one and a half years old. I looked for it a very long time in Hamburg, and it’s an instrument that fulfills all artistic demands to the highest degree: full sound; great length of tones, which is a prerequisite to realize the polyphonic structures, especially to point out the longer notes and organ-points; then a big elasticity and flexibility in the tonal palette, which is enormously important for underlining the independence of the voices, and which can bring out countless registrations, like on an organ. The mechanical lightness is so wonderful, which enabled me to realize the extreme virtuosity in the faster movements of the variations. The complete range of tone and voicing of the instrument is so plastic that the clarity of the polyphony is guaranteed at all times.

But, to bring out all these qualities, all terms have to come together. My piano technician, Georges Ammann from Steinway-Hamburg, is one of the best technicians all over the world, someone who collaborates with all major pianists. It’s through his great experience that this instrument can be played out in its full range and possibilities. He really did a great job! Otherwise, it’s my recording producer, Friedemann Engelbrecht, and my recording engineer, Julian Schwenkner (Teldex-Studio in Berlin, www.teldexstudio.de, which is renowned European wide), who worked on the really unique reproduction of my piano sound.

As we all know, the singularity in the art of Bach is the fusion of both levels and lines, the horizontal and vertical line. It’s a real wonder to see that the creation and forming of the horizontal line, the polyphonic structure, also results in this perfect, beautiful vertical line, the harmonic line. As we also know, Bach already used the full harmonic range and radius as no composer before him. My artistic aim of course is to point out the horizontal line in soloistic manner in a dynamically elastic way, but in the same breath to form the harmonic line in a bright field of color (I would call it “harmonic articulation”), to achieve a particular atmosphere of emotions and moods, drama, velocity, vividness, and so on. As we can imagine, these are high demands on an instrument. The instrument I found gives me these prerequisites, because the clarity on one side delineates the polyphonic structure, but these lines also are blending to a “compact sound,” by which it’s possible to realize and verify the harmonic articulation I have described. One can be lucky to find an instrument with both qualities.

J.R.: Do you regard yourself as a “Romantic” pianist? Do you approach Bach backward, starting from the Romantic era or perhaps from our own time, or do you try to approach Bach fresh, as a “clean slate,” unaffected by later musical developments?

B.S.: As a pupil of Shura Cherkassky, Bruno Leonardo Gelber, Poldi Mildner, and Herbert Seidel, I’m profoundly a representative of the great hypervirtuosic Romantic epoch. Perhaps you know that I played—and still do (!)—all the major works from this repertoire. But as already mentioned, my roots also go back to Bach and this special style of interpretation, where I’m also at home. In this special field of tension I also see many of the major composers and works in the Romantic tradition. It was no less than Schumann himself who said that great music finds all its combinations in Bach. Indeed, Schumann also builds up his works in polyphonic style, and even in his orchestral scores and symphonic movements he is a counterpointer. As Romantic and modern his work must have seemed to people of his era and lifetime, in main he was a classicist. That means that—and only to name one typical Romantic composer—Schumann cannot be understood without Bach.

However, to approach Bach backward, from the Romantic era or even from our own time, would be a failure and not the right way, because to bring out Bach in his right stylistic strength you have first to understand him in the Baroque era (and you also must have studied all the fine and sensitive differences in the performance of ornaments, trills, and so on), but that doesn’t mean that Bach couldn’t be romantic. Not at all! On the other side, I’m very skeptical in approaching Bach as a clean slate. To understand Bach, one has to be at home in the whole literature of art and interpretation; one must have great experience in performing the complete literature, from Bach until the early avant-garde. I’m absolutely convinced that only by this deep knowledge one can feel the all-embracing range of effects that are compressed in Bach and his music—and how later generations have been inspired. Only by this experience you can give the Bach interpretation a new balance and tension. In the case of the Goldberg Variations we are confronted with these all-emotional effects, and I’m also skeptical whether this all-embracing range can be touched by much too young players, on harpsichord as well as on piano. Knowing the true worth of this condensed and nearly welded-in polyphonic structure and singular musical architecture, one ultimately knows that it is impossible to play with the variations, meaning to change voices, or make doublings. Then the music itself would be robbed of its true worth and sense, which can only be revealed by bringing out the embedded simplicity, which however is transformed to an electrified, heated atmosphere. One has to respect the internal strength.

Bach really cannot be seen, understood, and interpreted from an isolated point. Bach has to be explored as part of something complete, unique, of a universe.

J.R.: In your biography, there is a statement that you find that Chopin has been influenced by Bach. Would you discuss this, especially as the Goldberg Variations may relate to the question?

B.S.: Chopin absolutely was influenced by Bach. We know that before Chopin himself performed in concert, he didn’t play anything other than Bach. His own Preludes are a reference to the Well-Tempered Clavier of Bach, and all Chopin’s students had to play Bach. In whole, Chopin admired Bach most of all composers, and it was nothing less than the Well-Tempered Clavier itself that was his musical diary. I also have said that Chopin is the crowning and climax of piano-playing. It’s something so unique, all-affecting in emotionalism, musical architecture, and structure, that all past giants are present in it: Bach and Mozart. Chopin’s elegance is so singular, that again you need much experience to convey his music in the real and original style. The question of rubato is very sensitive: It’s nothing arbitrary, but much more something well calculated and well proportioned, something that is integrated in the classical strength of form, which is constructed on the profound knowledge of the polyphonic and contrapuntal structures of Bach and Mozart.

Whether the Goldbergs may relate to this question? Absolutely! I again want to mention a certain and special term: jeu perlé. Without this you can’t play Chopin, you can’t play Mozart, and lastly absolutely not the Goldbergs. Again we return to the theme of my piano concert grand: if the piano cannot bring out this character, you are totally lost. In conclusion: all is in the same breath, and all is part of a big coherence. Therefore, interpretation also is a question of experience.

J.R.: What past pianists, if any, have most deeply influenced your concept of the Goldberg Variations, and in what specific ways?

B.S.: To approach Bach, one has to realize that 100 years after Bach’s death, Bach and his music totally had been forgotten. Even while he was still alive, Bach himself believed in the polyphonic power and the resulting symmetric architectures of well-proportioned music. But this had been an artificial truth—even for him. Other composers, including his sons, already composed in another style, where they found other ideals and brought them to new solutions. The spirit of the time already had changed while Bach was still alive. A hundred years later, it was Mendelssohn who about 1850 discovered Bach anew with the performance of the St. Matthew Passion. Now a new renaissance began, and the world learned to know the greatness of Bach. To become acquainted with Bach, many transcriptions were done. But the endeavors in rediscovering Bach had been—stylistically—in a wrong direction. Among these were the orchestral transcriptions of Leopold Stokowski, and the organ interpretations of the multitalented Albert Schweitzer, who, one has to confess, had a decisive effect on the rediscovery of Bach. All performances had gone in the wrong direction: much too romantic, with a false knowledge of historic style, the wrong sound, the wrong rubato, and so on. The necessity of artists like Rosalyn Tureck and Glenn Gould—again 100 years later—has been understandable: The radicalism of Glenn Gould pointed out the real clarity and the internal explosions of the power-filled polyphony in the best way. This extreme style, called by many of his critics refrigerator interpretations, however really had been necessary to demonstrate the right strength to bring out the architecture in the right manner, which had been lost so much before. I’m convinced that the style Glenn Gould played has been the right answer. But there has been another giant: it was no less than Helmut Walcha who, also beginning in the 1950, started his legendary interpretations for the DG-Archive productions of the complete organ-work cycle on historic organs (Silbermann, Arp Schnitger). Also very classical in strength of speed and architectural proportions, he pointed out the polyphonic structures in an enlightened but moreover especially humanistic way, in a much more smooth and elegant way than Glenn Gould on the piano. Some years later it was Virgil Fox who acquainted the U.S. with tours of the complete Bach cycle, which certainly was effective in its own way, but much more modern than Walcha. The ranges of Bach interpretations had become wide, and there were the defenders of the historical style and those of the much more modern romantic style. Also the performances of the orchestral and cantata Bach had become extreme: on one side, for example, Karl Richter, who used a big and rich-toned orchestra; on the other side Helmut Rilling, whose Bach was much more historically oriented.

I myself represent the style of a Bach who was a human being with all his heights and depths, who knew life very well. My Bach is the experience of my playing the whole literature; and filling the different voices with their own life, vitality, vividness; it’s the independent speaking-until-singing of the different voices; and lastly it’s a balance between pianistic virtuosity and something chamber-music-like.

I had been fascinated by Gould in his explosive emotionality, which really is part of my own conception, even if today I have the possibility of another interpretation, as explained; but there are two versions that I also admire very much: those of Perahia and Hewitt. But in answering your question: no interpretation has influenced me; moreover is my interpretation influenced by my knowing not only the whole literature, but also by my knowing the organ-Bach and his unlimited colors. And this richness is, so I hope, what I give to my listener. It’s an all-embracing conception of life.

We still have to mention giants like Wanda Landowska and Marie Claire Alain, who were a great influence on the Bach interpretations, but not to me.

J.R.: The Goldberg Variations are highly structured; how do you balance the need for structure, or musical architecture, with your desire for a performance to seem intuitive, spontaneous, or subjective?

B.S.: As so often I have pointed out, intuition is a level of the highest range. In details, I don’t have to think or to worry about the realization of my interpretation; no, it’s something that spreads out of my artistic all-compassion. Probably I have to be sorry for it, but this is my deepest artistic conviction for the rightness of an interpretation—interpretation as a summary of something unique and whole, not of a combining of details. Intuition is a level that includes all levels of emotion, intelligence, structure, and architecture. And I’m also confronted with the question of poetry and poesy, something that is so often neglected in Bach, especially, and again I’m sorry for my criticism in the historic style of interpretation.

Let’s take a look at the 25th variation of the second part. Here Bach meets us in his highest and deepest personal and human form: it’s like in the Art of Fugue in the unfinished fugue No. 20, where Bach confronts us with his personal signature. It was he himself, who, after he had been occupied during his whole life with symbols, with numbers, with the mastering of structural and formal problems and renewals, now he saw himself confronted with a personal view into mirror. He now shows us a human being in his whole conception of life. The composer of “Come, oh sweet death” now is confessing, “Oh sweet death, how bitter is your prickle.” In Contrapuntcus 20, bar 193, one feels this tragedy through the four chromatic tones, which are placed like a tragic breath of faith. The heartbreaking modulations from bar 210 until the end demonstrate the horror of death. By this we also are confronted in the 25th variation of the Goldbergs. Look at my time: more than nine minutes. I need this time to demonstrate this mood in its endless richness in the form of a geographic panorama. It has something of the aspect of standing still. But also another variation, the 21st, is a herald of this tonal speaking, and the 15th variation ends in visionary burning.

Many want to try to see in the 25th variation the nearness of Schoenberg, and by doing this they interpret this wonderful piece in a way that is academic, dry, rigid, motionless, and colorless. I fear this is the wrong insight and approach to the real and inner content of this piece, because by this it will totally lose its three-dimensionality. I’m convinced that it’s a very subjective, elastic, and confessional piece of Bach, as is the 20th Contrapunctus of the Art of Fugue.

The Goldberg Variations are, as explained in my booklet-text, in short, music that observes neither end nor beginning, music with neither real climax nor real resolution, music that, like Baudelaire’s lovers, “rests lightly on the wings of the unchecked wind.” Gould is referring here to the circular design of the work, a circularity whose development is polarized, inspired, and fed by more and more new energy fields. The result is a universe that in its significance resembles the alpha and omega of music in general, music that evolves out of nothing and disappears back into nothing as if in a state in which time stands still.

The interpretation reflects my deepest respect for the major composition of the musical literature. It’s the result not only of working nearly eight years on it; it’s much more the result of my lifelong occupation with music and arts themselves. And in the surround-version you find the lucky result of a combination of all parameters: truth and verity of the excellent acoustic possibilities of the studio-hall, my Steinway, my technician Georges Ammann, and, in special manner, Teldex-Berlin.

Go to Top




A Philosophy, Not a Profession: The Art of BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN
By Peter J. Rabinowitz - FANFARE-Magazin, March/April 2004
Describing someone as an “intellectual” pianist generates certain expectations about his or her playing: since it’s so often trotted out as a synonym for “objective,” the term prepares you for a musician who emphasizes formal structure rather than tonal color or expressive content, who’s sparing in rubato, and who aims for strict reproduction of the score rather than a more personal interpretation. Yet, as you’d paradoxically expect from any pupil of Shura Cherkassky, German pianist Burkard Schliessmann defies those expectations. For his is an intellectualism with a personal twist—as became clear from the three CDs under review, coupled with a series of conversations by phone and e-mail (which, in turn, often incorporated material from his thoughtful program notes).

Why do I call him an intellectual? For one thing, he pays scrupulous attention to the details of the score; it’s appropriate that his Web site features an endorsement from Harold Schonberg calling his playing “representative of the best of the modern school.” That attention applies not only to the musical details, but to the written instructions as well. Discussing the last piece of Schumann’s Kreisleriana, for instance, Schliessmann points out that the verbal cues tell us a lot about Schumann’s intended interpretation: “‘Die Bässe durchaus leicht und frei,’ Schumann writes. What does this mean? When we look at the score, we find that in each repetition, Schumann placed the deepest notes of the left hand at a different rhythmical place. When you hear the recordings of Horowitz and me, you will see that the demand of the text is fulfilled in a special manner: we play the left hand not simply in the rhythm as noted. No, we’re doing much more, by making the rhythm of the left hand independent from the ‘main-metrum,’ the right hand: the lower notes are playing their own way in a light, nearly dancing way; by this we are fulfilling the demand of Schumann, leicht und frei.”

Beyond his scrupulous attention to the score, Schliessmann can be called an intellectual because his performances seem to be informed by a profound study of 19th-century European culture. “My interpretations are based on the exact knowledge not only of the internal structures, but also on the historic background, which is a real influence on the artwork. [Understanding] the historical, philosophical, and sociological circumstances is important for the realization of singular interpretations. The Hegelian aesthetic enlightens and informs my deep respect for music and my own interpretations: ‘For art is not merely a pleasant or even a useful toy, art is the expanding of truth.’” Thus, Schliessmann not only talks comfortably about the composers (including their lives, letters, and diaries), but also about the literature, art, and philosophy of the time: how many performers of Kreisleriana can quote relevant passages from E. T. A. Hoffmann’s Kater Murr? How many can illuminate Chopin with a comparison to Kierkegaard? (“Chopin was a loner, undoubtedly elitist, but at the same time a sufferer. This is made clearer by a comparison with the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, who is said as a child to have given ‘martyr’ as his chosen career. Chopin too must have shared this cult of the ‘Pater dolorosus.’”)

His understanding of cultural history also includes some remarkable insight about the music criticism of the time. I was struck, for instance, by his fresh approach to Hanslick’s criticism of the Liszt Sonata. Few modern admirers of the Sonata take Hanslick seriously; if anything, his words are trotted out as one more example of how thickheaded critics can be. Thus, unless you want to mock the critic’s lack of understanding, there’s little reason to quote Hanslick’s quip that “anyone who hears this piece and finds it beautiful is beyond redemption.” But Schliessmann uses Hanslick to get insight into the work. Hanslick was, after all, an experienced listener, and “behind his apparently negative judgment there lies a whole set of observations which, if interpreted in a more positive way, are absolutely accurate.” More specifically, “Hanslick had fully grasped the work’s outrageous nature” by pointing to the music’s disruptive character. “Ever anxious to create contrasts by means of unpremeditated transformations and by exposing the same motivic cells through variations of pianistic instrumentation, Liszt often deviates, even in his most lyrical pieces, from three-part song form. To conclude from this supposed economy of thematic material that Liszt lacked inspiration would be to fail to recognize the improvisatory nature of his creativity.”

Schliessmann’s intellectualism is evident, too, in his desire for absolute control—at least, in this repertoire. (When playing works like Godowsky transcriptions, he has a “different personality,” one that abandons the search for control and is willing to run risks.) One of his models here is Michelangeli, someone with whom he wishes he could have studied. “I could have learned from Michelangeli. He had extreme control; he didn’t risk anything when he played.” Thus, while Michelangeli would not be an appropriate model for playing Godowsky, he was exceptional in Schumann, Chopin, Brahms, Debussy, and Schubert. “And this is what affected me and fascinated me in his playing. I could use this for my own playing, of Chopin, Schumann, and especially Liszt, because Liszt demands a very highly developed technique. You can’t make any notes that are not clear. It doesn’t mean you can play wrong notes with Godowsky, but Godowsky is a completely different style. Here you can risk anything, much rubato, many agogics.”

Finally, there is Schliessmann’s interest in “the architectural forms” of the music. Yet it may be here that we see some of the twists that make Schliessmann a different kind of intellectual pianist—for he’s more apt to talk about “narrative” than “architecture.” Asked, for instance, what contemporary pianists he admires, Schliessmann immediately names Maria-João Pires: “I like the narrative and expressive style of her performances, because they are not oriented to the metronome. The speaking character of her playing sometimes reminds me of Artur Schnabel, whose ‘speaking and narrative interpretations’ fascinated me early in life.” And with this interest in narrative comes a real focus on the disruptive qualities of the music he plays, his focus on the progress of musical events rather than on static structures. While his performance of Kreisleriana, for instance, never engages in aggressive sounds (more on that later), he certainly does heighten the music’s fantastic differentiation of moods. His performance of the Liszt stresses the disruptions, too.

In a way, then, Schliessmann can be said to be seeking out the subjective, rather than the objective, forms of the music. For, ultimately, personality is crucial to Schliessmann—both the personality of the artist and the personality of the performer. Indeed, his objections to competitions (which he avoids) stems largely from the way they stamp out individuality: “I’m convinced that even to win a competition is no guarantee for a career. Moreover, the typical playing in competitions has nothing to do with the real art of interpretation, which belongs to the personality of the artist, which is a mirror of the individuality and personality of the player. In competitions, very objective playing is necessary, playing which depends on the correct playing of all notes. In some cases, it’s a competition for the fastest and loudest playing. There is no chance to demonstrate a personal style and there is no time for the jury to discuss the sense of a style extraordinaire.”

His performance of the Liszt Sonata makes clear his extremely personal approach. Avoiding both the architectural rigor of Pollini and the sheer intensity of Horowitz, Schliessmann offers an unusually inward account of the music, on the slow side of normal (certainly he resists the temptation to race through the opening of the fugue), more likely to apply the brakes for interrogation of expressive details than to surge ahead for sheer drama. The technique is absolutely secure, but there’s no razzle-dazzle. As usual, this interpretive perspective seems to stem from a deeply considered study of the piece in terms of Liszt’s own life. Specifically, like Teresa Walters (see 24:5), Schliessmann sees the sonata in profoundly religious terms. “The listener with no preconceptions hears massive waves of sound breaking over him and forms from them the image of a passionate soul seeking and finding the path to faith and peace in God through a life of struggle and a vigorous pursuit of ideals. It is impossible not to hear the confessional tone of this musical language; Liszt’s sonata becomes—perhaps involuntarily on the part of the composer—an autobiographical document and one which reveals an artist in the Faustian mold in the person of its author. As in the Harmonies poétiques et religieuses, the underlying religious concept which dominates and permeates the whole work demands a special kind of approach. Whereas representations of human passions and conflicts force themselves on our understanding with their powerfully suggestive coloring, this concept only becomes manifest to those souls who are prepared to soar to the same heights. The equilibrium of the sonata’s hymnic chordal motif, the transformation of its defiant battle motif (first theme) into a triumphant fanfare, and its appearance in bright, high notes on the harp, together with the devotional atmosphere of the Andante, represent a particular challenge to the listener; he is, after all, also expected to grasp the wide-spanned arcs of sound which, from the first hesitant descending octaves to the radiant final chords, build up a graphic panorama of the various stages of progress of a human spirit filled with faith and hope. As the reflection of a remarkable artistic personality worthy of deep admiration and, by extension, of the whole Romantic period, Liszt’s B-Minor Sonata deserves lasting recognition.” In some sense, this approach to the Liszt mirrors Schliessmann’s often repeated convictions about music: “Music is a right, but only for those who merit it. It is not a profession to be a pianist and musician. It is a philosophy, a conception of life that cannot be based on good intentions or natural talent. First and foremost there must be a spirit of sacrifice.”

Probably the most immediately striking thing about Schliessmann’s recordings, though, is the stunning quality of the sound. In part, credit is due to engineer Marcus Herzog. The engineering on all three of these discs is remarkable; indeed, with regard to its ability to duplicate the sound of a real piano in a real hall, his new Chopin disc, at least when heard in surround sound (on either SACD or DVD-A), is arguably the best piano recording I’ve ever heard. Schliessmann insists that the quality of the sound has its source, as well, in the quality of his piano technician, Georges Ammann. But surely the pianist deserves credit, too? “I don’t want to be conceited,” Schliessmann says, “absolutely not, but it’s a fact that piano and player have to blend into one.” And in every way, Schliessmann seems exceptionally careful about the sounds he produces, both in the way he plays his instrument and in the way he has it recorded. Indeed, on his CD coupling Schumann and Liszt, he insisted on a different acoustic for each composer.

Significantly, for all his interest in history, Schliessmann is committed to modern pianos. He owns two new Steinways (“excellent pianos, very personal, and ‘trained’ by my friend Georges Ammann from Steinway”). Each has a different sonic character, and he uses them for different kinds of repertoire. The first—a piano much admired by Michelangeli, who would have bought it had Schliessmann not gotten there first—was used for his recordings of the Schumann and Liszt. “It is very fine for this kind of music, as well as for Brahms and Scriabin,” because after touching a note, “it develops a flower of tone” which merges with the tones beneath it. The other piano, on which he recorded the Chopin, is his favorite: “But it’s a piano which you can only use polyphonic structures and for polyphonic music. You can also use it very well for Bach or for Beethoven, not for symphonic music, because the tone is much more fragile.”

Not surprisingly, the interaction between piano and hall is also extremely important to him. He often travels with his own favored instruments (especially if there is a recording or broadcast involved), and he carefully adjusts to any hall in which he plays. “I need a day to hear the hall and to place the piano at the right place.” This maximizes the impact on the audience. In his care in this regard, he has been influenced by Horowitz. “Horowitz, in his comeback of 1965 in New York Carnegie Hall, worked a long time to place his piano at the right place. This has had a great effect on me.”

In the end, though, for all the interest in history, for all the interest in structure, for all the concern for sound, what really seems to generate Schliessmann’s performances is communication with his audience. “It’s quite an obsession to me to communicate at this moment, at this time, with my audience. I don’t only play for them, it’s something I want to give back to them. I feel how each listener in the audience is listening to me, and I feel its warmness, for example, and I give it back to the complete audience. I feel the intensity of hearing, of listening. This is like electricity, and this I give back to the audience. It’s very stimulating.” Indeed, this give and take is so important that, when recording in a studio, he likes to bring a few friends along to serve as an audience. “Sometimes, I ask one, two, or more people just to sit in the audience and to listen to me with concentration as I play. It’s stimulating for me, and I try to build up a situation like that in a recital with a live audience. This helps me to play in a way that electrifies people.” Given this concern with the give and take of communication, it’s not surprising that he records in long takes, avoiding the kind of patchwork cutting that so many others employ. “When I’m doing my records, I have prepared everything on a very high level. That means that I can avoid cuts; I can have a big line, a big arc of my whole interpretation. Even in the Schumann Fantasy, where we have three big movements, there are few patches. I only play each movement three or at the maximum four times and that’s really enough.” With too much editing, he believes, “I would lose my big line. Therefore, it’s easy to work with me on my recordings; they’re very quick to produce.”

All in all, Schliessmann is a fascinating artist—well worth your acquaintance. So which of these recordings should you start with? As I’ve said, simply in terms of sound reproduction, the Chopin disc is a real winner—at least if you have the appropriate playback equipment. To hear the Chopin in the way he recorded and the way he wanted it heard by his listener, “it is important to hear it on multichannel equipment with five speakers. Even though the SACD is a hybrid and thus compatible with a normal CD player, on a regular CD player you only will have compressed audio reproduction format. That means there are no room acoustics and all is reduced to a sound that has nothing to do with my interpretation. Listening in this way, you will get a wrong and false impression of my interpretation.” The same is true of the DVD version; unless you listen on DVD-A player, you’ll lose some of the quality. The DVD version has an additional virtue—a bonus video clip on which he plays the Waltz in C sharp Minor, although many will find that the nearly surrealist visuals distract from the music. “In all, this production has been a great challenge, but I’m a little bit proud to be one of the pioneers on these new high-end formats.” Indeed, Schliessmann even found that the quality of the recording influenced his interpretations, especially with respect to tempo. Because the new recording techniques give a truer sense of room acoustics, he says, they “gave me the opportunity to play passages in a manner I normally couldn’t play.” He points, as examples, to the intimacy of the second theme of the First Ballade and to the beginning of the Second Ballade: “I could play it in a very simple, plain way, like a pastoral song on a shawm.”

Still, I suspect that for many listeners his Chopin—especially his extremely patient exploration of the colors and textures of the Ballades—may be an acquired taste; although Schliessmann himself sees his approach as an amalgamation of the “classical strength of Rubinstein and the ‘romantic drive’ of Cortot,” in fact the dramatic elements are extremely muted. It’s excellent playing, given its premises, but it’s hardly mainstream. I’d therefore recommend starting with his earlier recordings—his mercurial (and highly polyphonic) Schumann and his spiritual recording of the Liszt Sonata. These are not exactly middle-of-the-road performances, either, but I suspect they’ll be more widely accessible.

But whatever your starting place, you are liable to agree that Schliessmann is not a run-of-the-mill performer.

Go to Top

 


In Amerika geachtet ...
Der Pianist BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN
Von Michael Stenger
 - 'Westdeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung WAZ - "Kultur" - April 2, 2005

Es gibt in Deutschland einen Pianisten, der höchste Gipfel erklimmt ... Ich spreche von Burkard Schliessmann. (...)

Schliessmann (...) ist er eine internationale Größe. In Amerika, wo er gefeiert wird, vergleichen ihn Kritiker mit der Spitzenklasse. Mit Earl Wild. Mit Svjatoslav Richter. Das sind die Maßstäbe, die Schliessmann in der Tat nicht scheuen muss. Wer hört, wie dieser Pianist die horrend schwierigen Bearbeitungen des Klaviertitanen Leopold Godowsky zu atemraubenden Bravourstücken zuspitzt, wer seine Liszt-Transkriptionen von Liedern Franz Schuberts erkundet, wird sagen müssen: Was für ein Pianist!

Oder noch treffender: Was für ein Musiker! Denn Schliessmann, der wirklich Glück hat, über die idealen Hände und Finger zu verfügen, begnügt sich keineswegs mit eitlem Glanz, mit bloßer Raserei. Er bringt Intellekt, Technik und Emotion in eine Balance. Da muss man sich die Zeit nehmen, seine Chopin-Balladen zu entdecken. Da geht´s nicht um funkelnde Läufe, um donnernde Akkorde. Die liefert Schliessmann (auch in Schumanns monumentaler Fantasie C-Dur) nebenbei. Während andere sich technisch durch die Liszt-Sonate hangeln, schafft Schliessmann sinnfällige Bezüge.

Die Musik erblüht gewissermaßen zu einem inneren Leben. Das wird der Pianist zum Erzähler, ja vielleicht sogar zum Psychologen. Da stimmt das Tempo. Da weiß einer, wie er kleine Freiheiten nutzen kann, Musik atmen zu lassen. Und wenn man mit Burkard Schliessmann spricht, ist man sofort eingenommen von seiner Sicht auf die Musik, von seiner weitreichenden Bildung, die Querverweise erst ermöglicht. Man merkt, wie kritisch und selbstkritisch dieser Künstler ist.

Seine Lehrer sind Legenden: Herbert Seidel, Shura Cherkassky, Bruno Leonardo Gelber und Poldi Mildner. Cherkassky, der die große russische Virtuosenschule wie wenige verkörperte. Poldi Mildner, die noch bei Rachmaninow, Schnabel und beim Liszt-Schüler Moritz Rosenthal studierte. Da bestehen unmittelbare Verbindungen zum 19. Jahrhundert. Und das spürt man, wenn Burkard Schliessmann am Flügel sitzt.

Natürlich hat dieser Pianist im Studio gespielt. Bei Bayer Records gibt´s viel Schumann (u. a. die Kreisleriana kombiniert mit den Symphonischen Etüden) und eben Skrjabin, der eine Spezialität des Künstlers ist. Denn da gilt es, auch im Gefährdeten seismographische Schwingungen aufzunehmen und weiterzugeben. Und es gibt bei Arthaus auf einer DVD jene sensiblen WDR-Filme, die Schliessmanns Kunst fokussieren. Da spielt er wie besessen Godowsky- und Liszt-Transkriptionen. Man kann ihm zuschauen und seine manuelle wie intellektuelle Kunst bewundern. Als Bonus-CD gibt´s dazu Chopin-Interpretationen, die vieles, vieles in den Schatten stellen.

Apropos Schatten: In Deutschland ist Burkard Schliessmann, der heute vorwiegend in den USA lebt und den Personenkult vielleicht zu wenig achtet, nach wie vor ein Geheimtipp. Sind es die Gesetze des Marktes? Ist es unausgesprochener Neid der Konkurrenz? Es steht fest: Man darf ihn nicht verpassen, sonst hat man etwas verpasst. 

Go to Top




Auf den Spuren der Wahrheit in der Kunst: Ein Gespräch mit BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN
Von Helmut Peters - 'Piano News' - VI/2000
This  interview is also released in the book of Carsten Dürer, "Gespräche mit Pianisten, 69 Interviews und Portraits", Staccato Verlag, 2002, ISBN 3-932976-18-5)
Ihre Diskographie ist nunmehr auf zehn Solo-CDs angewachsen. Und wieder ist es die Romantik, zu der Sie sich mit Schumanns Kreisleriana und den Symphonischen Etüden bekennen. Wie kommt es zu dieser Konzentration auf Brahms, Schumann und Liszt?

Nun, nicht nur Brahms, Schumann und Liszt, sondern insgesamt die große Romantik, d.h. die Hoch-Zeit des Klaviers ist es, zu der ich mich immer wieder - regelrecht - bekenne. Besonders die sog. «Deutsche Romantik», welche literarisch inspiriert ist, hat mich von frühester Jugend an fasziniert und gefesselt. Hierher zähle ich auch Chopin, den ich in unmittelbarer Nachbarschaft zu Heinrich Heine und - bekanntlicherweise - natürlich George Sand sehe.
Überhaupt finde ich mich in dieser Epoche und Stilistik aufgrund einer starken Wesens- und Geistesverwandtschaft wieder.
Aber dies ist nur einer der Grund-Aspekte: Mich ziehen Kompositionen "magisch" an, welche aus einer absoluten "Notwendigkeit" des "Seins" heraus gewissermaßen geboren wurden, d.h., Kompositionen, deren historisches Spannungsfeld ihrer jeweiligen Zeitumstände einerseits hochexplosiv war, anderseits deren "Schöpfer" sich in einem derartigen inneren "Kampf der Mächte" bis hin zu syphilitischen Zuständen befand, dass das Endresultat ein Ergebnis des eigenen inneren Befreiens, aber auch ein Gesamtkunstwerk seiner Zeit schlechthin war.
Gerade Schumann, als «das» Synonym der "romantischen Verknüpfung" zwischen Literatur, Kunst und Musik schlechthin, widme ich mich immer wieder: Ihn sehe ich auch als Problemfall, als tragischen Fall und Opfer einer Zeit zugleich: War er wirklich «krank», oder wurde er von der damaligen «Biedermeier-Zeit» immer wieder nur für «krank» geredet, weil er "seiner Zeit" ungeheuerlich weit voraus war und nicht so sein durfte, wie er wollte, sondern wie man ihn haben wollte? Dies würde nämlich bedeuten, dass man ihn in den Zustand des "Wahnsinn", der geistigen Umnachtung hineingetrieben hat. Für meine Interpretationen von entscheidender Bedeutung!
Aber sei es, wie es will: Eben dieses Flackernde, dieses Feuer, dieses Gesamt-Brisante dieser Musik ist es, welchem ich mich in einer regelrechten Art von Bekenntnis immer wieder verpflichtet fühle.
Eines meiner großen, künstlerischen Ziele ist es auch, Schumanns Werke (d.h. seine großen, bedeutenden Werke wie Kreisleriana, Fantasie C-Dur, Humoreske, Symphonische Etüden, Sonaten, Carnaval, Papillons, Nachtstücke, Noveletten, Fantasiestücke ...) nicht nur auf CD einzuspielen, sondern in den großen, internationalen Musikzentren an 4 Abenden darzustellen: Hier geht es mir auch um eine Neubelichtung der Schumannschen Sichtweise: Die Loslösung des teilweise überkommenen Bildes bzgl. des "zu Hause komponierenden Ehemanns" von Clara Wieck-Schumann als Hinwendung zu einer romantischen Künstlerfigur, die die nächtlichen Abgründe der Seele als Verkörperung des Wahnsinns gestreift hat.

Zum anderen verkörpert Chopin für mich die Krönung des Klavierspiels schlechthin. Seine Beschränkung auf das Medium "Klavier" sehe ich nicht als Defizit und Einseitigkeit, sondern als Ausdruck höchster Puristik. Keiner kannte die verschiedenen Register des Klaviers so gut wie er und wusste

Ist Burkard Schliessmann ausschließlich Solist oder gibt es auch verborgene Seiten, vielleicht auch einen verborgenen Kammermusiker an ihm? Bislang haben Sie noch keine Kammermusik-CD vorgelegt.

In meiner Studienzeit habe ich nicht nur viel Kammermusik gespielt, sondern sogar offiziell diesen Fachbereich zusätzlich studiert. Dadurch sind mir sämtliche Werke der Klassik und Romantik geläufig und ich verfüge über ein breit gefächertes Repertoire, vor allem in den Besetzungen Klaviertrio und Klavierquartett, aber auch Duo-Sonaten. Hier denke ich besonders an die Cello-Sonate von Chopin oder die Violin-Sonaten von Brahms.
Aber nicht nur dieser Bereich kammermusikalischer Beschäftigung steht mir nahe, viel mehr identifiziere ich mich mit der "Lied-Begleitung", da es hier wieder um die Aus- und Umdeutung von «Text» geht. Die Verschlüsselung von Text und musikalischer Umdeutung ist es auch, die einem letzten Endes hilft, einen Komponisten in seiner Gesamtheit zu verstehen.
Wenden wir uns zwecks eingehender Beleuchtung wieder einmal Schumann zu: Es genügt nicht zu behaupten, dass er der große Komponist krankhafter Seelenzustände ist. Der Hörer mag einen wagen und flüchtigen Eindruck davon haben, doch um es darzulegen, muss man sich au die technischen Mittel stützen, die er erfunden hat, um diese Seelenzustände in der Musik zu evozieren. In manchen Passagen seiner Klavierwerke sind die Hände ineinander verschränkt, und unser Rhythmusempfinden wird ständig verletzt. Ebenso kann Schumann auf Wirkungen zurückgreifen, die beim ersten Anhören als völlig unlogisch scheinen und erst in dem Maße logisch werden, in dem sich das Stück entwickelt. Darin gehört er ganz zu seiner Epoche, zu einer Periode, in der der Niedergang der Religion zur Aufwertung des Wahnsinns geführt hatte.
Zahlreiche Schriftsteller wie Gérard de Nerval, Hölderlin oder Charles Lamb versuchten eine neue Form des Verstehens an die Stelle des logischen Denkens, des Rationalismus, zu setzen. Schumann ist der Repräsentant dieser Strömung in der Musik.
Jeder, der die Musik Schumanns aufmerksam hört, wird diesen unlogischen, irrationalen, fast verrückten Aspekt empfinden. Wir bleiben aber im Bereich gängiger Banalitäten, wenn wir nicht genau präzisieren, wie es ihm gelingt, uns diesen Eindruck zu vermitteln. Die Wirkung der von ihm benutzten Verfahren werden wir verspüren: Vielleicht werden sie in uns eine tiefe Empfindung nachklingen lassen, aber wir können nicht sagen, dass wir sie verstehen.
Betrachten wir diesbezüglich die dritte Strophe des Liedes über ein Gedicht von Heine "Ich wandelte unter Bäumen? in der Komposition von Schumann: Die Botschaft ist zweifelsfrei eine Illusion: Schumann lässt uns das verstehen, indem er eine Tonart verwendet, die niemals etabliert wird und die also wenig überzeugend, also irreell ist. Darüber hinaus muss man klarstellen, dass diese Tonalität aus einem einzigen, fast ohne Veränderung wiederholten Akkord besteht. Es ist interessant zu sehen, wie es Schumann gelungen ist, diese dritte Strophe in die Struktur des Liedes einzufügen: die erste Strophe geht auf der melodisch wichtigsten Note zu Ende, während die zweite Strophe auf einer tieferen Note endet, und dieser letzte Ton ist es, der zum Träger des unwirklichen Akkordes der dritten Strophe wird, eines Akkordes, den er ununterbrochen, ohne Entwicklung oder Veränderung erklingen lässt. Dieser Akkord, der wie ein Schock eingeführt wird, wird geradezu wie in einer Obsession wiederholt. Und dann nimmt Schumann ohne Überleitung die Tonart der ersten Strophe wieder auf, so als ob nichts gewesen wäre. Durch diese Verfahren hat er das Mittel gefunden, musikalisch eine Art Vision oder Halluzination hervorzurufen.
Hier kann man erkennen, dass die Werke Schumanns wie die vieler romantischer oder gar klassischer Komponisten, häufig einen anderen Inhalt als die Musik selbst haben.
So z. B. die Pastoralen (Symphonien, Sonaten, Quartette), die immer ikonographische Klanglichkeiten repräsentieren, aber auf fiktive Art und Weise an das Landleben erinnern. Die Klangwirkung zweier Hörner, die leere Quintklänge spielen, evoziert die Ferne, die Wälder. Am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts oder zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts wird der Hörnerklang mit Ferne und manchmal mit Abwesenheit assoziiert. Beethovens «Les Adieux-Sonate» beginnt mit einem Hornklang, dem eines Jagdhornes, der verwendet wird, nicht um die Jagd, sondern die Ferne, die Trennung, die Abwesenheit heraufzubeschwören.
Aber nicht nur die Kammermusik und Liedbegleitung sind "verborgene Seiten" von mir. Kaum jemand weiß, dass ich auch Meisterklasse Orgel studiert habe und bereits im Alter von 21 Jahren das «Gesamte Orgelwerk» von Joh. Seb. Bach und Max Reger beherrschte. Das Orgelstudium war und ist Bestandteil meiner künstlerischen Vielfältigkeit und Wesensäußerung. Und überhaupt ist die Kenntnis Bachscher Orgelmusik für das Verständnis Bachs gesamter Musik von großer Bedeutung, da ihm dieses Instrument wie kaum ein anderes nahe stand. Hierin manifestiert sich auch die Tonsprache Bachs und deren Textausdeutung sowie der davon abhängigen Motivbildung in absoluter Konzentration, wie beispielsweise der "18 Leipziger Choräle", wo Bach die Stimmführung auf 2 Manualen und Pedal (teilweise auch Doppelpedal wie bei "An Wasserflüssen Babylons") verteilt auf der Basis lutherischer Texte zu höchsten kontrapunktischen Verflechtungen verdichtet und dennoch eine Schlichtheit von regelrecht kindlicher Frömmigkeit bewahrt. Gerade Bachs letztes Werk überhaupt, welches er auf dem Totenbett seinem Schwiegersohn Altnikol in die Feder diktierte, "Vor Deinen Thron tret' ich hiermit", ist ein ergreifender Schwanengesang, in der jeder cantus-firmus Zeile eine ausgearbeitete Vorimitation der anderen Stimme vorausgeht. Außer der ersten Zeile des Chorals, die leicht verziert ist, stehen alle Zeilen und Stimmen völlig ohne ornamentalen Schmuck da. Dieses Werk ist auch als Schluss der "Kunst der Fuge" mit der Textunterlegung "Wenn wir in höchsten Nöthen seien" bekannt. Bach bekennt sich hier als praktizierender Protestant: "O Tod, wie bitter ist Dein Stachel".
Sicherlich ein Wissensfundus, der sich - außer Glenn Gould, Wilhelm Kempff und Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, die selbst auch Orgel spielten, wohlgemerkt aber nicht zu "konzertanten" Zwecken - schwerlich bei einem meiner Kollegen finden lässt. Ich bekenne mich dazu, dass meine Klavier-Interpretationen teilweise stark von diesem inneren "Gebetston" inspiriert" sind, beispielsweise der 3. Satz von Schumanns Fantasie C-Cur oder die Sätze 2, 4, und 6 der Kreisleriana. Auch die H-Dur Mittelteile von Chopins Fantaisie f-moll und der Polonaise-Fantaisie op. 61 sind erfüllt von diesem religiös-visionärem Duktus. Es ist ein Gebet von schlichtestem, nach innen gerichteten Ausdruck, von hoher Intensität. Gerade hier begegnen wir Passagen, in denen die Musik beginnt, aus sich selbst heraus zu sprechen. Zu Bach und dessen Musik habe ich ohnehin einen besonderen Zugang, mehr dazu aber an anderer Stelle.

Und es gibt eine weitere, zwar außermusikalische, aber dennoch bzgl. des intellektuellen Zugangs äußerst anspruchsvolle und in ihrer Ausübung eine Herausforderung darstellende Tätigkeit: Ich bin Tauchlehrer bei PADI (=Professional Association of Diving Instructors), der weltweit größten und prominentesten Taucherorganisation und habe hier den Grad des «PADI IDC Staff Instructors» bzw. «Master Instructor» erreicht, darf also wiederum bis zum "Tauchlehrer" ausbilden. Ich bin mittlerweile fast auf der ganzen Welt getaucht und habe als Guide bzw. Tauchlehrer Tauchsafaris begleitet. Eine große Verantwortung insgesamt, deren Erfahrungswert ich jedoch nicht missen möchte. Für mich inspirierend bzgl. der Kontemplation wahrhaft göttlich-schöner Dinge, einer anderen, für andere nicht sichtbaren, Welt, eine Kraftquelle. Derzeit arbeite ich auch an einem Buch, in welchem ich Unterwasserfotos aus allen Meeren dieser Welt, die ich im Laufe meiner Reisen gemacht habe, unter dem Titel "Burkard Schliessmann: Impressions and Inspirations Undersea" veröffentliche.
Ich könnte hier zwar noch viel, viel mehr berichten, da dies eine Welt für sich ist, vor allem auch - zumindest auf dem Niveau, wie ich es betreibe - außerordentliches theoretisches Wissen in Physiologie, Physik und Biologie voraussetzt, aber letztlich ist es auch eine Art von Grenzerfahrung: Die Begegnung mit Haien und der Umgang brisanter Situationen bzw. das Treffen blitzschneller Entscheidungen zur Vermeidung von Gefahrenmomenten sind und bleiben prägend.

Aber um die Sache von allem o.g. auf den Punkt zu bringen: Meine Kunst, wie ich sie betreibe, ist eine Konzentration vieler Einzelheiten und Einzelfaktoren. Sie ist quasi auch aus einem Spannungsfeld ganz persönlicher Ausformungen entstanden. Der Anspruch, mit dem ich "Dinge" tue, mag teilweise für Außenstehende als abgehoben wirken, als - möglicherweise - unmenschlich; aber ich verspüre im Rahmen meiner "Wahrheitssuche" den Drang, die Dinge in ihrer Ergründlichkeit und Tiefe zu "erforschen", zu ergründen.

Dass ich heute vorwiegend solistisch tätig bin, liegt auch darin begründet, dass ich glaube, es gibt «typische» Kammermusikensembles, die ausschließlich Kammermusik auf höchster Ebene und höchstem Niveau spielen. Ich denke hierbei an das von mir hoch geschätzte Beaux-Arts-Trio, das Juilliard-Quartett, um nur einmal zwei zu nennen. Ich glaube ganz fest, um sich auf einer solchen Höhe "halten" zu können, bedarf es einer Konzentration, einer Entscheidung für etwas.
Umgekehrt gilt dies für einen "Solisten". Als künstlerisches Ideal schwebt mir vor, das Rezital auf eine neu Ebene persönlich-authentischer Aussage und Ausdrucks zu heben.

Ihre Schumann-Interpretation ist vergleichsweise kraftvoll, zum Teil sogar stark basslastig. Bitte verstehen Sie das nicht als Kritik, sondern als charakteristisches Merkmal Ihres Stils. Ist das persönlicher Geschmack oder orientieren Sie sich an vergleichbaren Interpretationsansätzen?

Es ist mein persönlicher Geschmack, der aber auch auf dem Zusammenspiel vieler Faktoren beruht: Zum einen ist es das Instrument, welches mein eigenes ist. Nach diesem Klangideal habe ich jahrelang gesucht und jage diesem Klangideal auch regelrecht besessen hinterher. Georges Ammann, mein Techniker von STEINWAY, ist ständig an meiner Seite, um an diesem Klangideal (welches auch seinen Vorstellungen entspricht) bzgl. «Intonation» zu feilen. Ich strebe auch ein Klangideal von Instrumenten an, die um 1920/30 gebaut wurden. Dies ist eine eigene und besondere Klangwelt. Hier finden sich auch diese "sonoren" Bässe. Man könnte schon sagen, dass ich von diesem Klangideal beeinflusst oder gar inspiriert bin. Instrumente von heute verfolgen andere Klangideale. Zum anderen ist es die Aufnahmetechnik, die diesen Klang entsprechend transformiert. Ich liebe diesen sonoren Ton, sehe aber auch umgekehrt in der "tragenden Bassrolle" eine wesentliche Bedeutung für die Rolle der Funktion der Harmonik, eine Voraussetzung auch für entsprechende "Farbigkeit".

Ich wäre neugierig, Burkard Schliessmann einmal mit einer Partita von Bach zu erleben, um den Eindruck zu erweitern. Kann man das, vielleicht in Live-Konzertprogrammen? Oder schließen Sie manche Repertoirebereiche ganz aus?

Ich denke, als Pianist muss man sich in allen Repertoirebereichen heimisch fühlen. Vor allem Bach ist ein Bereich, den man nicht ausgrenzen kann. Vor allem hier offenbaren sich ganz schnell Schwächen und Defizite. Es ist relativ einfach, mit Rachmaninoff oder Prokoffjev Eindruck zu hinterlassen, vorausgesetzt, man verfügt über entsprechende Technik. Mit Bach und der damit geforderten kalligraphischen Klarheit lässt sich jedoch nichts vertuschen. Darüber hinaus sehe ich in Bach das Grundverständnis für große Musik überhaupt, zu welcher auch wieder alles zurückfließt. Bach als Anfang und Ende, gewissermaßen.
Ich gehöre als Ehrenprofessor dem "Comité d'honneur" des großen internationalen Orgelwettbewerbs "Association des Grandes Orgues de Chartres" an. 1996 war ich hier Initiator für die Vergabe des LIONS-Musikpreises für die beste Interpretation eines Pflichtstückes von Joh. Seb. Bach in der Endrunde. Auch habe ich mich dafür eingesetzt, dass in diesem Wettbewerb grundsätzlich mehr Bach gespielt wird.
In meinen Konzertprogrammen findet sich gelegentlich auch ein größeres Werk von Bach am Anfang, wenn damit eine Abrundung und ein komplexer Zusammenhang des Gesamtprogramms hergestellt werden kann: Eines meiner Lieblingsprogramme ist : Bach - Partita c-moll; Schumann - Fantasie C-Dur; Chopin - Polonaise-Fantaisie op. 61; Liszt - Sonate h-moll.
Bereits seit früher Kindheit fühle ich mich mit Bach verbunden, hatte ich doch auch Orgelunterricht im Alter von 14 - 19 bei einem der letzten Walcha-Schüler. Später studierte ich dann bei Edgar Krapp, der Nachfolger von Helmut Walcha in Frankfurt/Main war.
Heute arbeite ich an einem neuen "Bach-Bild", in Ergänzung meins ohnehin urpersonalen Interpretationsstiles. Mit Sicherheit werde ich auch in Kürze dies auf CD festhalten. Ich weiß nur noch nicht, ob ich in diesem Falle Klavier oder Orgel spielen werde. Eines meiner Traumziele wäre nämlich die "Kunst der Fuge" an der "Großen Orgel der Sankt Laurenskerk" in Alkmaar, eines der für mich schönsten Orgeln überhaupt und eines der wohlgelungensten historischen Zeugnisse barocker Orgelbaukunst, zu interpretieren.

Es fällt auf, dass Sie sich große Freiheiten erlauben in der Wahl der Tempi. Zum Teil bauen Sie Miniverzögerungen ein, wo man sie gar nicht vermutet. Sind das intuitive Entscheidungen oder planen Sie minutiös im Voraus?

Sowohl als auch. Zum einen unterliegen meine Interpretationen einem grossen analytischen Prozess und damit Verständnis. Dieser Prozess ist aber kein wissenschaftlicher Disput, wie man gemeinhin annehmen möchte, sondern ein instinktives Verspüren des Zusammenwirkens vieler Kräfte und Faktoren. Es ist ein Verständnis der inneren Struktur, der inneren Polyphonie. Nach diesem intellektuellen Prozess feinst geregelter Bewegungsmechanismen kehre ich stets zurück zur intuitiven Entfaltung, zu meiner eigenen Subjektivität. Die Einheit dieses unumwundenen Bewusstseins ermöglicht mir auch ein großes Repertoire an interpretatorischen Finessen und Varianten, die ich - gleichsam segmentartig - in Abhängigkeit von Instrument, Raum und Publikum der jeweiligen Situation - gleichsam improvisatorisch - anpasse, einsetze und neu aufbaue. Ich mache Interpretation abhängig von Gegebenheiten, auch von der Reaktion des Publikums. Interpretation entsteht für mich dann immer im Moment, immer neu, quasi wie in einer unendlichen Improvisation. Darin liegt für mich auch WAHRHEIT. Wahrheit als philosophischer Begriff, als eigenständiger Wertfaktor. Daher habe ich auch das Bedürfnis, bereits eingespielte Werke zu einem anderen Zeitpunkt in einer anderen Interpretation darzustellen.
So sind diese "Miniverzögerungen", wie Sie sie nennen, Nuancierungen, die ich einbaue, um Stimmkorrespondenzen, Polyphonien aufzudecken, neue Zusammenhänge herzustellen, Klangstrukturen zu verdeutlichen. Möglicherweise machen diese - aus meiner eigenen Subjektivität entstanden - auch nur für mich Sinn, aber sie sind ein Teil meiner selbst. Diese Nuancieren bleiben aber jeweils der großen Gesamtschau, welche immer intuitiv ist und bleiben muss, über das jeweilige Werk untergeordnet. Ein Faktor, dem ich gerade für das Konzerterlebnis entscheidende Bedeutung beimesse: Emotion. Gefühl macht Eindruck, das ist nun einmal so. Der Hörer verlangt danach, um sich "angesprochen" zu fühlen.

Bei den Aufnahmen Ihrer Solo-CDs haben Sie sich stets als Gegner vom "Schnitt-Patchwork" erwiesen. Lieber spielen Sie ein Stück in zwei oder drei Komplettversionen und entscheiden dann im Gesamtvergleich. Wie kommen Sie zu dieser Einstellung?

Mir geht es immer um den "großen Zusammenhang" und dessen Hervorbringung. Die Werke, denen ich mich verpflichtet fühle, leben von diesem großen Zusammenhang und verlangen danach.
Diese Meisterwerke erweisen sich dadurch, dass sie einer "inneren" und "äußeren" Prüfung - um es einmal akademisch zu sagen - standhalten, d.h., dass kleinste Bausteine die Großstruktur bestimmen, umgekehrt die Großstruktur das filigrane Netz nicht außer acht lässt. Gleichermaßen muss auch eine Interpretation aufgebaut sein. Beschränkt man sich bei Aufnahme-Sessions auf kleine Bausteine und flickt diese - ohne Blick auf das Ganze - zusammen, so geht das eigentlich-Eigentliche verloren.
Darüber hinaus ist «Wahrheit» für mich ein untrügbarer Faktor. Ich vertrete nun mal die Auffassung, dass man - macht man schon eine Einspielung - das Werk einfach "drauf haben" muss. Es käme mir einem akustischen Betrug gleich, schneiden zu lassen, um Schwächen zu cachieren.
Außerdem habe ich von Anbeginn, wenn ich mir ein Werk zum Studium vornehme, eine feste Vorstellung, quasi «Vision», der das Ganze unterlegen ist und die sich wie ein Netz über das Ganze legt. Gerade bei Aufnahmen versuche ich, zu dieser Vision zurückzukehren. Dieser "Philosophie" und Vorstellung würde das "Schnitt-Patchwork" widersprechen. Meine Aufnahmen sollen einen reellen und objektiven Eindruck meines Spiels, meiner Kunst hinterlassen, quasi eine Art "live"-Vortrag.
Ich bin davon überzeugt, dass man Musik mittels "Schnitt-Patchwork" auf diese Art und Weise "tot"-schneiden kann.

Eine so deutliche Repertoirekonzentration, wie Sie sie repräsentieren, erlauben sich die ganz Großen unter den internationalen Pianisten. Viele der deutschen renommierten Pianisten suchen sich eher Nischen, widmen sich Randgebieten der Literatur. Gibt es da auch bei Ihnen Ansätze oder ist Ihre Repertoirentscheidung immer höchsten qualitativen Maßstäben unterlegen?

Um ehrlich zu antworten: Ich sehe mich als Diener meiner Kunst und meine "Repertoirentscheidung ist immer höchsten qualitativen Maßstäben unterlegen". Daher auch der immense Aufwand, den ich - in letzten Jahren in noch verstärktem Maße - stets betreibe: Eigener Flügel mit entsprechender Intonation, bei allen Sessions, Georges Ammann als Techniker, besondere Aufnahmetechniken sowie -Verfahren, mit denen ich mich vorher auseinander gesetzt habe.
Überhaupt ist das Ganze eine Gratwanderung geworden: Meine Interpretationen oder besser: Mein Spiel in seiner Gesamtheit hängt heute von so vielen Faktoren - inneren und äußeren - ab (Faktoren, die eben auch diesen großen Zusammenhang und Zusammenhalt ermöglichen), dass der Wegfall auch nur eines Bausteins mir Schwierigkeiten bereitet. Dies soll auf keinen Fall etwas Unsympathisches vermitteln, aber ich habe auf dieses Niveau eben viele Jahre hin gearbeitet. Es bedeutet für mich schlichtweg Professionalität, meine Integrität zu wahren. Und so ist der von mir betriebene immense Aufwand ebenso stets Professionalität, da ich nur dann mit dem Endergebnis mich identifizieren kann, was wieder ein Teil von Wahrheit ist.
Dass ich diese Werke spiele, geht auch darauf zurück, dass ich in weiterführenden Studien bei Shura Cherkassky, Bruno Leonardo Gelber und Poldi Mildner mich dieser großen Tradition verpflichtet fühle, da ich diese Werke da unter einem besonderen Blickwinkel kennen gelernt habe.
Wahrheit der Musik, Wahrheit des Klanges und Wahrheit der Interpretation als authentisches Zeugnis eines Interpreten bilden für mich ein untrennbar Ganzes.
Diese "Repertoirentscheidung, welche immer höchsten qualitativen Maßstäben unterlegen ist", ist Bestandteil meiner künstlerischen Botschaft. Ich glaube fest an sie, ebenso, wie Interpretation stets ein Bekenntnis subjektiven Ausdrucks sein sollte.

Sie haben vor einiger Zeit beim Hamburger Label ES-DUR Alban Bergs Klaviersonate op. 1 eingespielt. Ist das Ihr einziger Ausflug ins 20. Jahrhundert geblieben?

Nein. So wie ich zu Bach "zurückgreife" geht die Musik bis heute in ihrer Entwicklung für mich stets weiter. Ich habe neben Schönberg und Webern auch Messiaen gespielt (vor allem auf Orgel). Als Vollender des Klavierspiels sehe ich Ferruccio Busoni, dessen Werke ich äußerst schätze. Besonders oft habe ich die «Sonatina seconda» gespielt, eines der kompromisslosesten Werke seiner Zeit. Die Bach-Transkriptionen stehen regelmäßig in meinen Programmen. Ich sehe diese Werke in ihrer Adaption schon fast als "eigenständige" Werke an.
Heute setze ich jedoch Prioritäten und setze für die Klaviermusik für mich einen persönlichen Endpunkt bei Kompositionen von 1920/30. Die «Avantgarde» kollidiert aufs Entschiedenste mit meiner Vorstellung von Ästhetik, nämlich Klangschönheit und klassische Technik. Außerdem schätze ich nicht besonders das bewusst einkomponierte Fehlen von "Emotion" in der Musik ab dem zweiten Weltkrieg. Emotion halte ich nämlich für einen Grundbaustein in der Gestaltung von Musik, eine Grundenergie, welche auf keinen Fall fehlen darf. Daher also auch meine heutige Konzentration auf Musik des 18., 19. und frühen 20 Jahrhunderts.

Wie steht es überhaupt mit zeitgenössischer Musik?

Während meiner Kompositionsstudien habe ich mich intensiv damit auseinander gesetzt. Meine Grundhaltung habe ich ja schon dargelegt. Ich würde sagen, es ist auch ein Art "Typfrage", ob man das als Interpret vertreten kann. Ich bin eben - und dazu bekenne ich mich - ein typischer Repräsentant romantischer Musik auf der Basis klassisch-barocker Struktur, quasi im Sinne des "romantischen Realismus". Außerdem fordert man dies mittlerweile verstärkt von mir: In USA beispielsweise sieht man mich wiederholt als "besten Interpreten" der Literatur der sog. "Deutschen Romantik". Das verpflichtet auch, führt mich dahin immer wieder zurück. Was ich damit sagen möchte, dass nicht nur eine persönliche Affinität eine Entscheidung für eine Stilistik beeinflussen kann, sondern der Anspruch von außen, der - über die eigene Reputation hinweg - an einen quasi herangetragen wird, was schließlich zu einer Art "Verpflichtung" werden kann, die Konzentration auf gewisse Dinge zu richten. Dies gilt, so denke ich, generell so, nicht nur für mich.
In meinem persönlichen Fall jedoch ist es schon so, dass ich mich über diese Anerkennung freue, denn über die allgemeine Orientierung und das "zu Hause sein in allen Stilrichtungen" hinaus, von dem ich bereits gesprochen habe, liegt meine Affinität im Bereich der Großen Romantik, und damit möchte ich auch verbunden werden, d.h., mein Name soll da in Zusammenhang stehen. Wohlgemerkt ist diese Konzentration aber als Summierung der einzelnen Detail-Beschäftigung gewachsen und entstanden. Diese Literatur entspricht meinem Inneren, ist ein Teil von mir selbst, was ich bei zeitgenössischer Literatur schwerlich behaupten kann.
Manchmal ist es sogar so, als spräche Schumann, Brahms oder Chopin zu mir, und plötzlich habe ich einen fiktiven Einfall, der mich lange Zeit fesselt und nicht mehr loslässt. Und in diesem Sinne versuche ich immer, authentisch zu sein. Also auch wieder eine Form von Wahrheit.

Sie haben Aufnahmen bei ganz verschiedenen CD-Labels vorgelegt. Wie kommt es zu dieser Firmen-Vielfalt? Kann das nicht kontraproduktiv für einen Solisten sein?

Absolut, vor allem, wenn kommerzielle Interessen der Firmen dahinterstehen. Bei dem mittlerweile sehr renommierten deutschen Label BAYER-RECORDS habe ich seit 1987 Einspielungen gemacht. Zwischendurch habe ich dann Aufnahmen bei ANTES und ES-DUR vorgelegt, vorwiegend deshalb, weil man mich fragte, ob ich denn einen Beitrag zum Aufbau des jeweiligen Labels leisten könne (wie bei ES-DUR 1994) oder man auch Interesse an meinem Brahms-Zyklus aus den Jahren 1990/91 zeigte, welche bei ANTES (1992/93) erschienen.

Dennoch ist mein eigentliches Label BAYER-RECORDS, da Rudolf Bayer über außergewöhnliches Kunstverständnis und Allgemeinwissen verfügt. Dies verbindet bekanntlicherweise. Bayer und ich verstehen uns auch gut.
Nach der Scriabin-CD aus dem Jahre 1990 haben wir mit Schumann/Liszt (1999) und nun der aktuellen Aufnahme mit Schumann unsere Zusammenarbeit intensiviert und fortgesetzt. Es stehen bereits weitere Projekte zur Diskussion.
Eine Beschränkung auf ein Label sollte - nach meinen Erfahrungen - sein, auch schon für den Kunde: Der muss wissen, wo man zu finden ist.

Sie nehmen bei den Aufnahmen intensiv Anteil an den Schnittsitzungen und an der Endfertigung. Welche Kriterien setzen Sie auf ein aufnahmetechnischer Seite an?

Auch dies ist ein Beispiel meiner Professionalität und geschieht im Rahmen derer, dass ich den Aufnahmeprozess inkl. Schnitt bis zum Schluss minutiös überwache. Oftmals ist es auch so, dass sich die unterschiedlichen Takes nur bis auf ganz geringe Nuancen unterscheiden, und gerade dann bin ich wieder zur letztendlichen Beurteilung gefordert.
Aber auch aufnahmetechnisch habe ich ganz bestimmte Vorstellungen eines zu reproduzierenden Tones. Bekanntlicherweise stellt gerade der Klavierton die Tonmeister immer wieder vor Probleme. Seit vielen Jahren suche ich nach einem "Idealton". Erst Steven Paul, den ich um Hilfe bat, nannte mir das Tonstudio SYRINX in Hamburg, ein Studio, das sich vornehmlich aus ehemaligen SONY-Technikern (nach dem Wegfall von SONY-Hamburg) zusammensetzt. Marcus Herzog schloss diese Lücke: Es ist eine Zusammenarbeit wie in Trance; er ist in der Lage, nicht nur einer Interpretation zu folgen, sondern einen wesentlichen, künstlerischen Beitrag zu dem Ganzen beizusteuern.

Die jüngste CD ist gleichsam auch ein Experiment, insofern Sie den STEINWAY-Flügel inmitten eines großen holzgetäfelten, aber eben leeren Kirchenraums plaziert haben und die Mikrofone weit ab aufstellen. Das Ergebnis ist ein sehr runder Klang. Wie sind Sie auf diese Idee gekommen?

Ausgehend davon, dass ich immer auf der Suche nach Neuem bin und mit "Gewesenem" eigentlich immer hart zu Gericht gehe (ich bin mit mir selbst auch im Grunde nie zufrieden und treibe mich immer neu an...), habe ich lange nach einer Lösung gesucht, um weitere Optimierungen zu erzielen. Dass wir bei der jüngsten Session die Bestuhlung der Ebert-Halle im Parkett entfernen ließen, war in der Tat ein Experiment. Vor einigen Jahren war ich noch nicht so arriviert, um diese "Forderung" stellen zu können, aber ich kämpfe auch für meinen Erfolg, würde dafür sogar im Ernstfall mein Leben aufs Spiel setzen. Dass das akustische Endergebnis - ich freue mich über Ihre Anerkennung und Nettigkeit, dass der Ton Ihnen gut gefällt - so ausfällt, ist aber auch die Summierung von Details: Zum einen ist es natürlich der Flügel mit seiner einzigartigen Intonation, mit einen ausgewogenen Bässen und dem kristallinen Diskant, der eine wesentliche Grundvoraussetzung darstellt. Dass die Mikrofonaufstellung so weit vom Flügel entfernt sein konnte, bedingt die starke und überdimensionale Fokussierung des Instruments. Dies war auch der ausschlaggebende Faktor, diesen Aufwand zu versuchen, zu betreiben. Es dürfte dahingestellt sein, ob das - rein akustische - Endergebnis mit einem anderen Instrument ähnlich wäre. Ich habe auch immer geahnt, dass die Bestuhlung bestimmte Frequenzen im Raum herausfiltert. Auch daher also der Versuch. Abgesehen davon haben wir auf heute offiziell nicht mehr zu zugängliche Mikrofone zurückgegriffen. Hier betrete ich jedoch einen Bereich, wo ich um Verständnis bzgl. "Firmengeheimnis" bitte. Und insgesamt liebe ich den großen, symphonischen Klang. Dieses Programm, so denke ich, verlangt auch danach.
Wir hatten auch Glück mit dem Wetter: Die Luftfeuchtigkeit betrug konstant 56°. Bei Werten darüber hinaus klingt ein Instrument nicht mehr.
Die Summierung der Details und eine Gesamtschau der persönlichen Leistungen hat dieses Ergebnis hervorgebracht: Marcus Herzog von Syrinx, Georges Ammann, das Instrument selbst, der Raum als Einheit, und möglicherweise meine Wenigkeit als Pianist.

Sie selber schreiben über Musik, über ihre Bezüge zur Literatur. Sind Sie ein Spezialist für den romantischen Stil, für romantische Philosophie und Denkart?

Nun, ich möchte nicht eingebildet sein, ich würde aber fast sagen "Ja".
Um Schumann beispielsweise zu verstehen, ist es wirklich notwendig, Jean Paul, Eichendorff oder E.T.A. Hoffmann gelesen und in sich aufgenommen zu haben. Chopin war von George Sand und Heinrich Heine ständig umgeben ...
Aber es existiert auch eine typisch romantische Spielweise, welche heute fast völlig vergessen wurde und durch die internationalen Wettbewerbe und deren Einfluss ins Abseits geraten ist: Ich spreche von dem ?rezitativisch-sprechenden? Spiel von Pianisten wie Alfred Cortot, Artur Schnabel, Sergej Rachmaninoff, Benno Moisewitsch, Joseph Hoffmann und Leopold Godowsky, um nur mal einige zu nennen. Besonders Cortot kommt meinen Ansätzen gleich. Leider wird dessen Spiel heute allzu oft missverstanden und im Gegensatz zu dem blutleeren Spiel der Wettbewerbe als technischer Defizit missgedeutet. Die Wahrheit ist jedoch, dass dieses Spiel in seiner Größe, in seiner Gesamtschau über das jeweilige Werk (ein Punkt, über den ich ja bereits sprach) und Risikofreudigkeit unumstritten, einmalig ist.
Ich kenne diese historischen Interpretationen fast allesamt und orientiere mich auch - trotz meines eigenen, persönlichen Stils - heute noch daran, ohne jedoch zu kopieren.

Wir haben eine gemeinsame Vorliebe literarischer Art. Sind Sie ein Hoffmannianer?

Ich denke, nach dem, was ich nun schon so von mir gegeben habe, dass diese Frage sich fast von selbst beantwortet. Auch in unseren Telefonaten war diese Geistesverwandtschaft bereits zu spüren. Hoffmann selbst war ja auch von selten vielseitiger Begabung, Jurist, Zeichner, genialer Dichter und phantasiereicher Komponist. Die Stärke seiner musikalischen Begabung spricht auch aus seiner Begeisterung für Bach, Beethoven und die alten italienischen Kirchenkomponisten. Lassen wir E.T.A. Hoffmann doch selbst einmal zu Wort kommen, wenn es um die Beantwortung der Frage geht, ob es denn immer möglich ist, für das große Publikum über Musik zu schreiben: In einem Essay erörtert Hoffmann nämlich die Frage, in dem er einem zweitklassigen Komponisten antwortet, der behauptet hatte, dass die Modulationen Mozarts zu komplex für das Verständnis eines großen Publikums seien. Das Beispiel, das Hoffmann wählte, ist die Friedhofsszene im Don Giovanni, in der die Statue mit dem Kopf nickt, um die Einladung zum Abendessen mit Don Giovanni anzunehmen. Diese Szene ist als ein Duo in E-Dur gesetzt, aber dem Kopfnicken folgt ein aufgelöstes, von den Bässen des Orchesters gespieltes C, das erstaunt. Der professionelle Musiker, konstatiert Hoffmann, erkennt die erniedrigte Unter-Mediante und huldigt Mozarts Meisterschaft; das große Publikum hingegen fröstelt, ohne sich zu fragen, wie diese Wirkung erzielt wurde: es fühlt aber wohl, dass sie überraschend und sonderbar ist; lediglich der halbgebildete Musiker ist durch die chromatische Veränderung verwirrt, die zu erklären er unfähig ist. Der gebildete Musiker und das große Publikum sind also in ihrem Verständnis und ihrer Bewunderung vereint, nur der mittelmäßige Musiker ist ausgeschlossen. Hoffmanns Kommentar ist lehrreich: er erlaubt, zu verstehen, dass man, um die Musik zu erklären, tiefreichendes technisches Wissen benötigt, aber auch, dass man, wenn man ein gewisses Niveau an Verständnis und Wertschätzung besitzt, diese Erklärungen nicht braucht.

Doch zurück zu Ihrer Frage:

In meiner Interpretation der «Kreisleriana» bin ich sehr stark von dem Geist E.T.A. Hoffmanns und seines Romans "Kater Murr" beeinflusst, inspiriert und schließlich erfüllt, ja gar süchtig nach dem Extrem, über das Julia klagt, das "Extrem der Gefühle, welches ihr die Brust zerschneide".
In meinem Essay im Begleit-Booklet der CD habe ich dies ja eingehend beleuchtet.
Der romantische Überschwang mit all seinem Stimmungsgehalt und das neobarocke Element der Kompositionstechnik Schumanns verleihen dieser Komposition eine unglaublich explosive Spannung. Auch hier haben wir wieder ein Beispiel dafür, wo ich von diesem "großen Atem", der "Gesamtschau" spreche, die absolut Voraussetzung für ein Gelingen einer Interpretation ist. So etwas lässt sich nicht "ausrechnen" ...

Warum haben Sie noch nicht das Klavierwerk E.T.A. Hoffmanns einer eigenen Interpretation gewürdigt?

Sorry, ich gebe zu, dass es bisher an mir - fälschlicherweise - in meinem Pensum vorbeiging. Ich werde Ihre Anregung aufgreifen. Ich denke, die Interpretation oder Einspielung div. Werke (ich denke an die große "Fantasie für Klavier" oder die vier kontrapunktisch gearbeiteten Klaviersonaten), von ihm ist längst überfällig ...

Warum verzichten Sie in Ihren jüngsten CD-Booklets auf eine biographische Darstellung Ihrer eigenen Person? Möchten Sie hinter die Werke zurücktreten? Ist das Bescheidenheit?

Sowohl als auch. Ich möchte auch niemanden beeinflussen. Außerdem denke und hoffe ich, dass die Frage nach meinem akademischen Werdegang nach all meinen CD-Einspielungen und vor allem Fernsehproduktionen (ich hatte das Glück, mit Producern wie José Montes-Baquer, Lothar Mattner, Franz Korbinian Meyer und Regisseuren wie Claus Viller und Enrique Sánchez Lansch zusammen zu arbeiten ...), auf welche ich sehr stolz bin, nicht mehr im Vordergrund steht oder sich fast erübrigt. Ich denke doch, dass sich mein "Werdegang" in meinem Spiel konzentriert, manifestiert und somit für sich spricht.

Sie haben während Ihrer Studienjahre in Frankfurt auch Komposition bei Heinz Werner Zimmermann studiert. Hat Burkard Schliessmann auch einen verborgenen "Werkkatalog"?

Sie bringen mich in Verlegenheit, aber ich muss gestehen, "Ja". Ich habe beispielsweise an Kompositionen, d.h. besser: Fugen gearbeitet, welche im Stile Bachs im «doppelten Kontrapunkt» in der Oktav, Dezime und Duodezime, und das noch enggeführt "per Augmentatione" plus Umkehrung gearbeitet ist. Der Witz ist, das klingt noch...
Möge vielen mein Werdegang suspekt sein: Mit Neid und Neidern habe ich allzu oft zu tun. Auch aus diesem Grund vermeide ich eine objektive Biographie. Sie würde den Rahmen sprengen. Also lassen wir die Musik von BS für sich sprechen ...

Im Laufe Ihrer Karriere haben Sie sich hin und wieder zurückgezogen, haben eine Art "Künstlerruhe" gepflegt. Brauchen Sie das zum Sammeln?

Unbedingt. Mein Spiel ist ein sich ständig abrollender, dynamischer Prozess, der mich quasi aufsaugt. "Ruhephase" ist als Wort vielleicht nicht ganz zutreffend, vielmehr sind es nämlich Phasen, in denen ich zurückfinde und meine eigene Entwicklung hinterfrage, überprüfe. Ich arbeite in diesen Phasen an neuen künstlerischen Konzepten. Die ungeheure Kraft und Elektrizität, die ich beim Entwickeln dieser architektonischen Großformen benötige, bei gleichzeitigem Ineins von vehementer Attacke und glühendem Espressivo muss jedes Mal neu geboren werden. Ich hasse nämlich Routine. In meinen Konzerten übertrage ich diese Momente mystischer Versenkung als besondere Spannung auf das Publikum: Es entsteht ungeheure Ruhe in Form von Spannung. Dies sehe ich auch als Voraussetzung an für die Kommunikation zwischen Publikum, Künstler und dem jeweiligen Kunstwerk. Dieses einzigartige Fluidum der Konzertsituation liefert mir auch jedes Mal neue Inspirationsquellen. Von Anfang an war das Podium und dessen Atmosphäre für mich nicht hemmend sondern eher stimulierend. Um dieses Moment zu erhalten und nicht abstumpfen zu lassen pflege ich in meinen "Ruhephasen" eben auch Dinge für die Seele: Ich gehe zum Fischen, Tauchen, treibe Sport. Dinge, die mich "aufbauen". Dinge, die mir gut tun, sind auch förderlich für meine Kunst; und umgekehrt gilt dasselbe. Meine Lebensführung ist darauf abgerichtet.
Horowitz ist das beste Beispiel: Dessen Energien, dessen einzigartige Fähigkeit zur Elektrisierung waren nach Jahren aufgezehrt. In seiner längsten Phase zog er sich für zwölf Jahre zurück. Man weiß ja, in welchen Spannungsmomenten der Energiefelder er sich zeitlebens befand, welche Energien an und in ihm zerrten. Er blieb es sich, seiner eigenen Identität und der Kunst schuldig, Dinge neu zu überdenken. Welche Veränderung aber auch in seinem Spiel nach zwölf Jahren.

Wie können Sie mit Kritik umgehen?

Sehr gut, solange diese einer fachlichen Kompetenz unterliegt und der Fachkritiker einer inneren Berufung zum "Drang der Äußerung" unterliegt. Weniger schätze ich Kritiker, die - als verhinderte Solisten - regelrecht ihr Dasein fristen. Man spürt in all' ihren Darlegungen dieses "Ressentiment".
Unabhängig davon: Es gibt Kritiker, deren Äußerungen ich abstrichlos für einen Solisten überlegenswert bisweilen anregend halte. Es bleibt einem selbst überlassen, was man für sich "mit rüber" nimmt. Ansonsten empfehle ich jedem, sich von Kritik unabhängig zu machen und zu fühlen. Es ist von großer Wichtigkeit, ein eigenes und über Jahre hinweg geschultes, genauer und hellwacher Kenntnis unterworfenes Verhältnis zu sich selbst und seinem eigenen Spiel aufzubauen. Erst dann ist man in der Lage, Rezensionen entsprechend zu werten: Hat man ein Werk beispielsweise haargenau so interpretiert, wie man es sich vorstellt, erträumt, also quasi eine Art "künstlerische Sternstunde", dann darf eine anders lautende Kritik einen von "seinem Weg" nicht abbringen. Umgekehrt gilt natürlich dasselbe, dass einen im Falle einer missglückten Darstellung ein positiv, wohl wollend lautendes Urteil nicht versöhnen darf.

Ich selbst setze mich nicht nur mit der Kritik, d.h. mit dem Geschriebenen, auseinander, sondern auch mit der dahinterstehenden Person. Ich relativiere also. Dies ist von großer Wichtigkeit für mich. Ich stehe auch dazu. Ich räume jedem auch die Freiheit zu seiner Meinungsäußerung ein, solange dies auf fairer Ebene abläuft und bleibt. Ich schätze es jedoch nicht besonders, wenn einige Künstler immer und immer wieder von sich behaupten, sie lesen ihre Kritiken nicht und es sei ihnen egal, ob gut oder schlecht in der Kritik bewertet zu werden. Am übernächsten Tag nach dem Konzert, wo die Kritik in der Zeitung steht, sind das jedoch die Ersten, die hinrennen und lesen ...

Ich selbst habe meine gesamten internationalen Pressestimmen gesammelt und zusammengestellt. Auf meiner Homepage aktualisiere ich diese auch regelmäßig.

Was empfehlen Sie jungen Pianisten, um eine eigene Identität zu finden?

Ich sehe große Probleme und direkt eine große Gefahr für die Kunst in der Schnelllebigkeit unserer heutigen Zeit. Jungen Pianisten bleibt oft nicht die Zeit der Rückbesinnung, der Ruhe, der Zeit eines inneren Reifungsprozesses. Bereits in der Schule setzt sehr schnell eine Spezialisierung ein (Kollegstufe), die eine eigentliche Ausweitung einer "Allgemeinbildung" verhindert. Diese Entwicklung stelle ich in Frage.
Dann sehe ich das Problem der int. Wettbewerbe, bei denen es allesamt um den Wettlauf um das "schnellste und lauteste Spiel" anstelle um die "Musik an sich" und deren Hervorbringung geht.
Auch die Wahl eines entsprechenden Lehrers ist von höchster Wichtigkeit: Ich lehne entschieden bestimmte Talentschmieden ab, die quasi guruhaft, ihre Schüler auf den vorderen Plätzen der Wettbewerbe plazieren anstelle den tiefergehenden Gehalt der Kunst zu lehren.

Ich wünsche jungen Pianisten die Kraft, dieser Maschinerie zu widerstehen und die Fähigkeit, in sich selbst hineinzuhören: Wenn sich Begabung und Talent, Fleiß und härteste Arbeit, Intelligenz und die entsprechende Ausweitung einer allumfassenden Bildung die Waage halten, dann ist die Voraussetzung für die Schaffung und Entwicklung einer eigenständigen Persönlichkeit geschaffen.

Zu dieser Entfaltung ist eine heutzutage leider immer mehr in den Hintergrund tretende Eigenschaft notwendig: Mut. Mut, sich nicht zeitlich-kurzlebenden Strömungen zu unterwerfen oder gar unterwerfen zu lassen, Mut zur Unabhängigkeit, Mut, eigene Konzepte zu entwickeln und dahinter zu stehen. Mut zur Eigenständigkeit; Mut, sich vom Trend der "Anpassung" zu lösen.

Und überdies steht für mich die Bewahrung einer Natürlichkeit und menschlichen Einfachheit in Form menschlicher Größe an zentraler Stelle: Wenn die Blickrichtung über alle intellektuellen Bezüge hinaus geht, droht die Gefahr, den Blickwinkel zum "Inneren", womit ich diesbezüglich das normale Leben meine, zu verlieren: Große Kunst wurde nämlich aus dem "Leben", dessen Menschlichkeit , dessen Einfachheit und auch dessen Niederungen geboren. Arroganz ist hier fehl am Platz.

Kunst und Interpretation als ein Aspekt humaner Wirklichkeit - womit der Kreis der Intuition geschlossen wäre.... 

Go to Top




BURKARD SCHLIESSMANN
Talks with Robert J. Sullivan, Jr. - HIGH PERFORMANCE REVIEW USA, IV/1992
German pianist Burkard Schliessmann studied at the Frankfurt College of Music and Arts, receiving his diploma in 1987. While still in school, he began his very successful forays into recording and performance.

Today he is in the midst of recording the complete Brahms piano works for Bayer Records.

Schliessmann's approach to the piano, though guided by a piercing intellect, remains essentially intuitive. His emotionally expressive style can be heard in music from Beethoven to Scriabin to Busoni.


Sullivan: Who are your favorite pianists, past and present?

Schliessmann: My "favorite pianists" - as you call them - are Schnabel, Solomon, Cortot and Serkin. These are the ones I consider historic. Of those still playing, Michelangeli for me is the greatest of all. I admire his astonishing intellect, the electricity, concentration and maturity of his singular, serious and highly personal interpretations and, last and not least, his huge technique, which indeed is something for connoisseurs. His beautiful, sonorous and controlled tone and sound is a mystery. You'd never find "affectation" in Michelangeli's playing.

I admire Schnabel and Solomon for the stile parlando of their phenomenal Beethoven interpretations; Cortot for being a typical representative of the dawning 19th Century and Romantic period, showing us how Chopin should be understood; and Serkin, for demonstrating what depth music and interpretation finally can have.

Sullivan: Are there any pianists whom you admire but do not try to emulate (for reasons of technique, philosophy, or temperament)?

Schliessmann: Yes, there are many. Ivo Pogorelich, for example. Our interpretations are completely different from each other. For myself, I also cultivate an extreme style. But the aim and purpose of all this extremely personal pianism is to develop large architectural forms while maintaining the harmony of vehement attack and ardent espressivo at one and the same time. And this is not seen from above in the classical manner, but rather as a dynamic process that unfolds inexorably before us. This heroic spirituality and the radical illumination of the inner essence of great music in its most concise form are the roots of my musical training in the spirit of Romantic Realism. That's also my "mystery," because as a human being I feel at home in nearly all stylistic epoches of musical literature and art. I think the historical, philosophical and sociological circumstances from the special epoches are important for the realization of singular interpretations. The Hegel Aesthetic enlightens and informs my deep respect for music and my own interpretations: "For art is not merely a pleasant or even a useful toy, art is the expanding of truth."

Sullivan: I know many concert pianists find practice pure drudgery. When you have finished with all your practicing for an upcoming concert or recording, what sort of music do you play in your "free" time?

Schliessmann: I myself don't find practicing "pure drudgery." I embark on the conquest of a new work in altogether normal fashion: intuitively, and to a certain extent improvisationally. Then comes an intellectual process that helps to gradually consolidate the structures, until everything comes full circle, returning via meticulously controlled kinetic mechanisms to a kind of improvisation that is now lit by the intellect.

One important aspect of this cyclical, post-creative investigation, as it were, is the analysis of individual parameters. Melody, rhythm, and harmony are examined to locate the areas in each where specific conflicting forces are at play, and are then reformed to produce a new whole.

In studying and practicing I'm never tired or even cramped, because for me it is a challenge to create music. This is a reason that I needn't play "other music" in my spare time.

Sullivan: Do you listen to records? [To study a score, for instance.]

Schliessmann: I listen to many records. I've heard nearly all the great music in the library of other great artists. But I'm not specifically influenced by them. It may be curious, but I have learned a lot from great singers like Caruso, Callas, Domingo, and others. It's very important for my interpretation of melodic lines.

Sullivan: I've heard advance copies (tapes from the DAT master) of the first three discs of your complete solo Brahms - I have to say, the Friedrich-Ebert-Halle acoustic is wonderful, and your piano, the same one you used for the Scriabin, sounds luscious. What's so special about this combination?

Schliessmann: First of all, the piano I'm using for Brahms is not the same one I used for Scriabin. For Scriabin, I used a piano with a great, brilliant and clear sound; it shouldn't sound hard. I like to be able to illumine the polyphonic structures by creating an extreme variability of colors. With Brahms, however, I use a piano that helps me articulate the compact structural composition. Because Brahms uses nearly all 88 keys, the bass and descant should be well balanced, maintaining the highest dynamic range and variability. The intonation and sound should be a romantic one.

It is fatuous to believe that a piano technician can satisfy all these expectations. Martin Bagge from Steinway & Sons Hamburg did a great job! The Friedrich-Ebert-Halle in Hamburg is well known for its fabulous acoustic. This is the reason many fine artists are doing their recordings here. It's also the merit of my sound engineer, Eberhard Schnellen, for picking up the real sound from the piano in combination with the acoustic of the hall. Synthetic echo effects are not necessary. The piano must be properly located; I've tried it out several times to establish that.

Sullivan: Many artists really dread coming into the recording studio - André Watts and Ivan Davis are two notable ones. Of course, Glenn Gould couldn't get enough of it. How do you feel when the "red light" goes on?

Schliessmann: In this case I also "can't get enough." Because I'm doing all my recordings in a concert hall, I don't feel the typical and sterile atmosphere of a studio. Often I'm stimulated nearly like in a real concert. My practicing and preparation for a recording are so good that I can follow my artistic aim of producing even for CD something really "alive." Therefore, I prefer to play only one or two takes from each piece to preserve the larger context of a complex work. I try to avoid "cuts" whenever possible.

Sullivan: You've toured quite a bit. What do you look forward to in each new city?

Schliessmann: I try to feel the atmosphere in a new city and to learn something about the character and mentality of the people living there. In the evening, during the concert, I try to react to these impressions in my music to give it back to the audience.

But I also have other ideas after arriving. During my first stay in New York, for example, I visited the Guggenheim Museum.

Sullivan: Are there any plans for a Carnegie hall performance?

Schliessmann: Yes, my concert agency is in contact with some sponsors. I hope it will work out, because it would be a great challenge for me, which I indeed would like to accept.

Sullivan: I know you had some studies with Cherkassky in Washington, D.C., and played two dates with the New York Philharmonic and the National Symphony. What has been your impression of musical America?

Schliessmann: Shura Cherkassky is an artist with much tradition. He himself has been a pupil of the legendary Russian pianist Josef Hofmann. It is nearly the same with my other teacher, Poldi Mildner, who was a student of Rachmaninoff, Rosenthal, Teichmüller, and Schnabel. You can trace the tradition back to Liszt, Brahms, Czerny, and Beethoven. Also, with the New York Philharmonic you feel the great artistic experience of special musicians playing there, because besides their engagements with the orchestra, most of them are excellent soloists. I think this is one reason for the individual sound of this orchestra.

Sullivan: What are some things you do outside music?

Schliessmann: Besides my music, I need something completely different; therefore, I do a lot of sports, like jogging, swimming, and fishing. I also enjoy literature: Thomas Mann, Brecht, Kafka, and Frisch are favorites. For refreshment and concentration of my mind I do yoga.

Sullivan: After the Brahms project, what is next on the recording slate?

Schliessmann: I would like to record the "Bach Variations" of Max Reger combined with the "Prélude, Choral et Fugue" of César Franck. I'm a great fan of harmonic structures in large architectural forms of seldom played music. These two works represent nearly a "prototype" of compositions, where the harmonic possibilities reach their own climax.

Sullivan: How about another recording of the Busoni concerto? (I'm joking.) Can you believe surge of interest in that piece?

Schliessmann: Of course. I love Busoni - he is the culmination of pianism. Besides this his composition style is especially various; as with Scriabin, you can find compositions from the tonal to the atonal. His "Sonatina Seconda" is one of the first real atonal compositions without compromises. The piano concerto (Op. 39 with choir) is his largest, longest and grandiose work. Yes, I could imagine playing it.

Sullivan: You have a big but mellow tone; your hands look quite large. How does one's natural equipment predispose one to a certain kind of music - or does that make any sense to you?

Schliessmann: There's some truth to it. For playing Mozart you don't need large hands, but for Scriabin, Liszt, Brahms, Reger, Rachmaninoff and so on, long fingers and large hands are indeed necessary. But finally it is a question of technique and how to use your physical power and lastly how to combine these two elements so that the tone and sound can be very great - but never hard. You find this problem in Scriabin especially. Even the most difficult passages in puncto "technique" you have to play so that they seem quite simple.

Other difficulties are confidence and physical stamina, attributes you absolutely need for existing on the stage. If you can summon new power and energy during your concert performance, you can concentrate absolutely on the interpretation.

Sullivan: Brahms has received a lot criticism for his unwieldy piano technique, yet by all accounts he was a rather accomplished player who premiered his own concertos. What do you know about Brahms the pianist?

Schliessmann: Robert Teichmüller, the teacher of Poldi Mildner (I had the honor to study with her), was one of Brahms' closest friends. Through that connection I know something about Brahms' manner of playing the piano. You often find many prejudices, but he must have been an excellent pianist indeed. Do you believe that he could have composed pieces like the Paganini and Handel Variations or the F-Minor Sonata if he hadn't the necessary technique? I myself don't believe that his music suffers from a certain weightiness. Of the young Brahms, Joseph Joachim (the Hungarian violin virtuoso) said: "So free, wild and full of fire he played . . ."

Sullivan: Claudio Arrau said that the slow movement from the great F-minor sonata, Op. 5 rivals Tristan for its expression of erotic love. That was the young Brahms: bold, energetic, and deeply in love with Clara Schumann. In later years, he turned to short forms - the Intermezzi, Klavierstücke, Capricci and so on - miniatures of extreme introspection and beauty. The torrent of Sturm und Drang has been replaced by the intimate glow of a candle. How do you approach the two "Brahmses"?

Schliessmann: "Energetic" and "energico" are the right expressions for the understanding of nearly all compositions of Brahms, in the early and late works. I believe that Brahms felt that in his piano sonatas he succeeded in something that could never be repeated: fusing in the sonata form a maximum of spontaneous expressive force with the highest measure of formal discipline. The sonata in F-minor and the Handel Variations are unmistakable in their singularity. Pianistic bravura is a prerequisite for playing them.

Completely different is the later Brahms. Outbursts of a dark passion, inner dissatisfaction, and raging bitterness took musical form. A comparison with Beethoven will illustrate this further. While Beethoven in his most passionate movements succeeds in elevating human self-esteem and leaves his shaken audience uplifted after every storm, Brahms in the Fantasies relieves only himself. This is due less to a difference in creative ability than to differences in spiritual attitude and human stature. Brahms' Fantasies develop into closely woven compositions in which a keen awareness and understanding of art (which is awake even in dreams) lend clarity of expression and aesthetic measure. The pianist inevitably delivers a self-portrait. Not only are these lyric poems for piano addressed to no one in particular, they are also monologues in the literal sense of the word. They express what the partner in his life is not supposed to hear, because it is locked up tight in the "labyrinth of the heart."

The venture of such a "reverie," where a state of mind lost to the world is illustrated by extremely subtle means, is not recorded in the history of the instrument before Brahms. We next meet the same passive and contemplative state of mind with the impressionistic traits in the works of Debussy and the early Bartok compositions. One has to admire how Brahms endowed his reveries with absolute perfection of form and delicate lyric expressiveness by using the higher notes of the instrument.

Brahms' characteristic "yearning," "secret reverie" and "grief about himself" are discussed even by Nietzsche in the second addendum to his paper "The case of Wagner...the problems of musicians" (1888). There one finds those sentences that have been quoted so often and so often misunderstood: "...He deplores his limitations; he does not create from the abundant wealth of expression but craves for it. If he were to deduct all that he copies and all that he borrows from the great ancient and modern and exotic - he is a master of copying - then all that remains of himself is his yearning.

"Brahms is moving so long as he is secretly dreaming or grieving about himself - in this case he is modern...he becomes cold and no longer concerns us anymore as soon as he becomes a mere heir of the classics..." (Pocket edition XI 220).

Now we are left to ask ourselves whether Nietzsche's discerning characterization does not refer more to the musical fin de siecle mood of the time than to Brahms alone...

Sullivan: Your Scriabin playing has been met with much acclaim. In fact, that's how I got to know you. I love your performance of the Third Sonata! How were you drawn to this ultra-romantic?

Schliessmann: Comparable with the declaration above about puncto "Brahms," it's again the mood and atmosphere and - last not least - the philosophical background of Scriabin himself which give me inspiration for my interpretation. Scriabin himself speaks - in his commentary to this sonata - of "a sea of feelings, tender and sad: love, sorrow, vague yearning and inexplicable thoughts and the terrifying voice of creative people, which plunges, temporarily defeated, into the abyss of non-existence."

Sullivan: How does an audience respond to something like Scriabin's Sonata No. 9, "Black Mass"?

Schliessmann: The response depends on your interpretation. Indeed, this piece is hard to understand and is completely unusual for the normal audience. The true value of this magnificent work will not be understood or felt during the performance, but some time after finishing it. The variation of his mystical ecstatic vision, with its pressing musical logic and enormous pianistic power is, of all Scriabin sonatas, the one most at risk of being misconstrued as a graphic illustration of erotic experience. In truth, Scriabin's Eros relates to the ecstatic mystery of the spirit that must encompass light and darkness, good and evil; the "ecstatic" excitement of the Ninth Sonata, then, should be understood not as physical, but rather as a presentation of the spiritual interplay of incorporeal powers and as preliminary to spiritual deliverance.

Go to Top